Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,654 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As I said almost no modification needed, with none at all to the bike. Cost around $40.00 total.

As I wasn’t looking forward to boring holes in my new bike or hacking up the wiring and none of the homemade relays set ups I have seen are weatherproof. So I decided to mix Kawasaki and aftermarket parts to get a clean set up and save money over the price of the factory setup, I’ve seen prices from $80.00 to $140.00 for it. So here’s the deal.


You need a Kawasaki Relay kit, Part # 99994-0195. This is the relay and bracket; I paid $34.00 at my dealer and did see it online for $30.00. When you think about it a Bosch E-5000 relay goes for $10.00-$15.00 and is NOT weather proof PLUS you’ll have to either hack the wiring or rig up a bunch of spade connectors to hook the electrical side of things THEN mount it.

Next the socket, The Kawasaki one cost over $80.00! YIKES! However I found a BikeMaster part #15-1668 that works just fine, or if you want a mini plug (BWM style) they have that as well #15-1666, even to the point of plugging right into the Factory harness. It even looks to be weatherproof, I paid $8.99 and have seen it for under $8.00.

Here’s the only mod needed. The BikeMaster socket is a tad to large for the hole in the Kawasaki bracket, maybe .5mm/ .015”. All of 30 seconds with my Dremel and then a shot of paint and problem solved!


The directions are so easy to follow that I won’t bother to give a blow by blow just pull the middle and upper fairing bolt it on and plugs up the wires and you're done

Here’s it is after I mounted it on the bike, fairings are off as you can see. I used a couple of Zip Ties and then ran a quick test and buttoned her back up. All of 20 minuets work. No hacking, whacking or cussing! “All Too Easy” as Darth Vader said!


The "Extra" wire is the ground for the second power point. The Power lead is a twin male that's hooked up to the socket.

After I got the bike back togather you can see it's tucked well out of the way.


Plugged up, notice? No Smoke! :p


PLUS with the factory wiring there are now two power points I can use, the socket and then an extra power lead and ground. I plan to tie into that for my heated gear controller when it gets cold. Remember this is a switched power point so no forgetting to turn off things and killing the battery.



Time
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Nice job and good research on the project.

Bikemaster parts, do you get them through the internet??? Cheapest plug that I have seen and it looks pretty good. Even cheaper than the automotive bedliner plugs.

Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
Just did this install tonight! Got the Kawi plug, though. Been doing so much bike work, I just wanted plug and play! I used the extra connections to wire in my GPS mount.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
852 Posts
Does any one know if this will work for the first gen Versys?

When I look up the relay part number it say that it's only for 2010 and up but I don't see why it would not work for the older bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,654 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I don't think the 1st gens were pre-wired for a power point. So You'll likely have to mount and wire your own.

Check with Twisted Throttle as I think they have a wiring kit you could use and a handlebar clamp mount that would make life easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Worked Perfectly . . .

On a 2013 Versys. Bikemaster unit ($7.71) went into OEM relay ($43.95) mount with no mods. Thank you for the mapping this out, info and pics really helped!
:clap:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
Wanted to add one photo to this excellent thread, of the bracket mounted to the bike taken from the left side rather than from above or inside-to-outside. You can see the pointy end of the bracket (see Post #1 in this thread) sits right against the factory mounting for the left fairing. The right angle sits inside the right angle of the mount. The bracket includes a place to mount the relay so the accessory relay socket is tucked up under the relay and is protected from water and dirt by the relay's rubber shroud.

Kawasaki saved $20 or $30 by not equipping it this way at the factory, but they have made it super easy to install a 5-amp switched accessory socket. The service manual shows the 5-amp fuse under the seat, and under the left fairing where the relay plugs in and where/what the wires are, but there's no drawing of the bracket or relay, so until this thread no one (to my knowledge) had documented how it all comes together. Great job, "Time"!

This thread should be a sticky - it's a good reference!

See photo:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
That is great, and I am going to do this. However, there are other similar threads that don't use a relay. Soooo, what is the relay doing and do I need it ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,762 Posts
That is great, and I am going to do this. However, there are other similar threads that don't use a relay. Soooo, what is the relay doing and do I need it ?
You need the relay if you are going to leave things like your GPS or Phone charger plugged in. The relay will cut power to all devices when the bike is off saving your battery while parked.

Mine is wired always hot (No relay and fused) so I can use a battery tender when parked. I must remember to unplug any devices when parking for a long time as chargers do draw a small current which could eventually drain the battery if left for a long enough amount of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,654 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
You need the relay if you are going to leave things like your GPS or Phone charger plugged in. The relay will cut power to all devices when the bike is off saving your battery while parked.

Mine is wired always hot (No relay and fused) so I can use a battery tender when parked. I must remember to unplug any devices when parking for a long time as chargers do draw a small current which could eventually drain the battery if left for a long enough amount of time.
What the Capn said PLUS with the Kawasaki Relay it's a plug and play job not hacking of wires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Yes, Ths Capn explained a good reason for having a relay when you turn off the motorbike.
If you ever came out to a "dead motorbike due to battery" you certainly will appreciate the help.

Concerning the GPS, many riders do like "to plan" their next move on the GPS just after stopping. For this reason, some riders like to have a GPS on an always hot circuit. But of course, you best train yourself to turn it off, or even remove the unit after stopping for any length of time.
Additionally, as stated in other posts, having that hot plug available you now have an easy accessible plug & no excuse to not have that battery charger plugged in. :thumb:

If you forget?........well, you might want to re-read my 2nd sentence above. :goodidea:

A good idea is to wire up 2 hookups.
One that goes thru the relay.
One that is always hot....but waterproof covered when not in use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,044 Posts
I've got just what DustyOne describes....the 'factory' accessory relay/bracket with Bikemaster 'cig lighter' socket that is switched, and another parallel SAE plug, always on, that's used with my battery tender. Besides the factory + and - hookups to the battery, I have stacked two more - one for the AME heated grips, and the other for the always on battery tender charger hookup. I was able to get both positive leads fed through the red rubberized plastic cap over the + battery terminal, so they are protected from shorting, etc. Both those aux leads are fused, and if you hook anything directly to the battery, make sure there's a fuse in the circuit! Using the accessory hookup in this thread utilizes the 5 amp fuse that Kawa built in to your Gen 2 bike, so no need to do anything special for that.

Seriously great kudo's to "Time". If you buy components off eBay, you likely won't get instructions and you would have wondered WTF do I do with this funky bracket? heh!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,119 Posts
...Concerning the GPS, many riders do like "to plan" their next move on the GPS just after stopping. For this reason, some riders like to have a GPS on an always hot circuit. But of course, you best train yourself to turn it off, or even remove the unit after stopping for any length of time....
I use Garmin GPS's, so when I turn the ignition OFF, the GPS says "TURN OFF/ STAY ON" - off in 28 seconds (internal battery), etc. I press "STAY ON", load whatever, then press the OFF button on top of the unit.
:goodidea:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,654 Posts
Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
A GPS or Cell phone are not really going to draw that much power, they pull mini-amps. I have a "Hot Plug" to hook the battery charger up to and things like my cell phone when I need to. I was worried about big draw things like heated grips at 4 amps they will suck your battery dry in short order. My old heated gear was even worse so much so that I was at the point of it killing the battery in my KLR when the bike was running!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
There's quite a bit of terminology here for an idiot like me to follow and understand...

So to clarify...not using a relay means I have to remove anything connected so I don't drain the battery?

I'm planning on using a power outlet to connect my phone to use the GPS app. So I want to keep it charged for the GPS and to have it fully charged when I get to my destination.

Given that I would never leave the phone with the bike unattended I don't really need the relay?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,762 Posts
There's quite a bit of terminology here for an idiot like me to follow and understand...

So to clarify...not using a relay means I have to remove anything connected so I don't drain the battery?

I'm planning on using a power outlet to connect my phone to use the GPS app. So I want to keep it charged for the GPS and to have it fully charged when I get to my destination.

Given that I would never leave the phone with the bike unattended I don't really need the relay?
A relay is a switch controlled by the bikes 12V. Instead fo turning the switch of with your finger, a relay uses 12V from the bike to turn on and off the switch.

If you add a power socket without a relay (direct to the battery with inline fuse), the socket will always be "hot" or "live". Anything connected to the socket while the bike is off will drain the battery. the good thing here is you can use a battery tender to maintain your battery while the bike is off. If you go this route, you must unplug devices when parked. An empty 12V socket will not drain the battery unless there is a defect in the socket itself which in most cases would blow the fuse.

With properly wired relay, when you turn off the key, the relay loses its control voltage therefore the relay (switch) turns off automatically killing power to your socket. You could leave a phone plugged into the socket and the phone will quit charging with the bike off, and save your battery. Also, if using a relay, a battery tender will not work through the relay/switch when the bike is off.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top