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Discussion Starter #1
We used to have a pilot at the airline that the mechanics (aka maintnoids) called "Mr. Light bulb.

He was a good friend but was totally anal when a bulb was out. It drove the maintnoids crazy.

Anyway I got to play Mr. Light bulb yesterday. On our hundred mile lunch ride I noticed my low beam side was not shining.

Got home and discovered that indeed the bulb had given up the ghost.

I checked OEM bulbs online only to discover they wanted a lot for a 55 watt H7 Halogen bulb. So I called O'reilly's and picked up one for $14.

They are a bit of a PITA to change out on the 2015 V-650 and newer. Not much room to get your hands in to remove and install the bulb.

The biggest pain is the rubber dust and moisture cover. It fights you the whole time when you try to swing the retainer clip over to secure the bulb and socket.

Fortunately after a few choice words and the use of a long thin screw driver and a long pair of needle nose it was mission accomplished.

Although a pain it still beats having to remove the entire head light assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I was looking at the factory bulb that came out of the bike and it was an Osram 55 watt bulb. I assume it was the original bulb but don't know for sure.

Bike is 3 years old with 17k miles on it. Thinking a bulb should last this long????

I don't ride at night so I have both head lamps adjusted up to shine brightly for all to see me. Especially the brain dead folks that love to turn left in front of or pull out in front of us motor scooter guys.

The O'reilly bulb was just as bright as the high beam side. I put the bike on my paddock stand and rolled the front wheel unto a 2 X 4 so the bike would level. Then walked about 75 yards down the street to have a look. Man the lights are bright even in the day time. I ALWAYS run in high beam mode so both lamps are lit. Went back into the garage and was seeing spots for a few minutes afterward.

I was considering putting an extra high output led auxiliary light or two on the bike for visibility but the two factory lights adjusted up are plenty bright.
 

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...Bike is 3 years old with 17k miles on it. Thinking a bulb should last this long????....
Could BE. The OEM lo-beam bulb in my '08 lasted 40,8xx miles (about 5 or 6 years), and the hi-beam is still the OEM at 78,8xx miles.
 

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Always highbeams. Intentionally aimed high to dazzle other motorists... I'm glad we have laws against such things around here. But I do, on occasion, encounter other similar minded motorcyclists who also believe dazzling oncoming traffic is a good and safe idea, regardless of the law, because they are special. I always salute them with my high beam (5 times brighter than theirs) and my landing lights (each 2 times brighter than their highbeams). I also indicate to them that they are number one in my books, with a middle finger salute, when we pass. Though they probably can't see that, due to 7 times the light directed their way.

If you want to be visible on a bike, you don't have to be a jerk. Just don't wear black, and give the bike a little wiggle when you think someone hasn't seen you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Always highbeams. Intentionally aimed high to dazzle other motorists... I'm glad we have laws against such things around here. But I do, on occasion, encounter other similar minded motorcyclists who also believe dazzling oncoming traffic is a good and safe idea, regardless of the law, because they are special. I always salute them with my high beam (5 times brighter than theirs) and my landing lights (each 2 times brighter than their highbeams). I also indicate to them that they are number one in my books, with a middle finger salute, when we pass. Though they probably can't see that, due to 7 times the light directed their way.

If you want to be visible on a bike, you don't have to be a jerk. Just don't wear black, and give the bike a little wiggle when you think someone hasn't seen you.
Not trying to be a jerk, just trying to stay alive. Folks in cars just don't see bikes.

The lights are adjusted up a bit but NOT towards the left where the on coming traffic would be.
 

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Not trying to be a jerk, just trying to stay alive. Folks in cars just don't see bikes.



The lights are adjusted up a bit but NOT towards the left where the on coming traffic would be.


Keep telling yourself that. You may believe it some day. You can even use the CHP as an example (because they couldn't possibly be wrong) to justify your actions. But, you know the truth. Your proactive actions are intended to cause harm to others in an effort to mitigate a known risk to all motorists using public roads, exclusively for your personal benefit.

Now, here is the part that is morbidly funny: Your efforts to be seen are probably making the situation worse for yourself. Your headlights are physically close together, appearing to be just like a vehicle far away - two light sources close together. As a result, other motorists are MORE likely turn in front of you. Again, with your highbeam's on, you appear to be far away from them! Re-read this paragraph until you fully comprehend it.

Okay. Now that you have seen the light (sorry, couldn't resist!) and understand the errors of your way, you are likely wondering what you should be doing to be more visible. Here is the solution you have been seeking: Add (small) lights, down low and as far apart as possible, creating a triangle pattern with the single (low beam) headlight. Other motorists will be able to judge your distance and rate of closure much more accurately. Look at how the lights on a freight train (in North America) are configured for an example of what you should be trying to do. The railroads have too much experience with this distance/speed issue and have invested a fortune trying to prevent costly collisions at the tens of thousands of unguarded rail crossings across the continent. The triangle light pattern is their solution that has been proven to work.

I hope that all makes sense...
 

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THREE lights on the front!

Here's a pic of my '09 (since written-off) w/ LED "Bullet Lights" from England making a triangle.



My '08 has identical lights, while my '15 has a set of Denali DMs in aprox. the same position.
 

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