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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm thinking about changing the exhaust on my Gen3.

The service manual indicates it should be an easy job - here are the steps:
1. Remove lower fairings (done that multiple times during oil changes, trivial)
2. Disconnect and remove the O2 sensor
3. Remove right frame cover
4. Remove right footpeg
5. Remove exhaust pipe holder nuts
6. Remove the muffler

And then installation is described as the reverse, but with the added step of replacing exhaust pipe gaskets. I've already sourced 2 such OEM gaskets.

After a more careful read of the service manual, and gathering info from some other chapters, I found out that:
- When re-installing the O2 sensor, you need to apply silicon grease. This is confusing to me, I thought it'd be copper grease, as this part is subject to a lot of heat, and (dielectric) silicon grease should instead be applied to the connector, not the threads of the O2 sensor itself?
grease.jpg
- The O2 sensor looks like it has a washer underneath. Copper, I think? Should I replace it as well? Neither the service manual, nor the parts list seem to indicate it's there, am I seeing things?
- The O2 sensor needs to be torqued according to spec. I have a torque wrench, but since there's a cable sticking out of it, my regular sockets won't work. There are special O2 sensor sockets, like the one I attached, with a long cutout for the cable. Should I get one of these?
41GlpHSAu6L.jpg
- Anything else I'm missing? I'm sure some people skip such details, but I'd like to learn how to do things properly :)
 

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I'd be using a very small, carefully applied, amount of anti-seize compound on the threads of the O2 sensor. Excess compound could contaminate the sensor and require its replacement.

If you don't plan on changing O2 sensors for a living, a wrench will work just fine. When tightening the sensor, go slowly and feel for the gasket to crush, then stop.

No need to make it more complicated than it is, this isn't rocket surgery...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the help guys! Is the washer a standard size? Ie. do I go to the parts store and ask for a "O2 sensor washer" or should I know the dimensions? Do you know them?
 

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I did not replace any washer on the O2 sensor when I installed a Leo Vince. I cant remember if there was one on there really but it has been fine for a few thousand miles since.

I had to order a thread adapter for the O2 sensor, fortunately there are only a few sizes of these things so it was easy to find and $8. If you are shooting for a quick install ensure that detail is taken care of first I had to wait a few days for one to arrive.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've just completed the swap two days ago, went without problems.

Left the O2 sensor washer that was already there. I figured out if there's a leak, it's a 20 minute job to change it later. I also didn't put anti-seize on the O2 sensor threads, since:
1. I haven't found any when I unscrewed it from the old exhaust, and it's been there for over 30 000 kms. It came off easily.
2. I was afraid I'd muck up the sensor itself.
I torqued the sensor "by feel". So, turns out I did take some shortcuts.
Note for others, the Kawasaki O2 sensor requires a 17mm spanner/socket, not the typical 22mm you apparently see more often for automotive O2 sensors. That makes it hard to get the special slotted socket, hence I used an ordinary 17 spanner. The previous exhaust had a 17-22 mm thread adapter.

It was a pain in the butt to simultaneously lift the exhaust from under the bike and screw it on without a second pair of hands or a jack, but sliding increasingly tall boxes underneath as I lifted eventually worked.

Thanks for all the help :)
 

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An better solution is to get your ECU flashed by Steve in Sunny Florida and you will not need the 02 sensor at all.
 

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Why would you think so? Doesn't the O2 sensor adjust the fuel/air mixture to make sure bike isn't running too lean etc? If you remove it, how would the ECU know what needs to happen?


An better solution is to get your ECU flashed by Steve in Sunny Florida and you will not need the 02 sensor at all.
 

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Why would you think so? Doesn't the O2 sensor adjust the fuel/air mixture to make sure bike isn't running too lean etc? If you remove it, how would the ECU know what needs to happen?
I dont think he was saying the O2 sensor was bad or useless, just spreading awareness of the ECU flash by Steve, which is great btw. The flash from Steve at one time did not use the O2 sensor, the current version does use the O2 sensor. Why that changed I do not know but I don't ask questions, just grin more when I twist the throttle now :grin2:
 
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