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2017 Versys 1000k
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Discussion Starter #1
Like many, I have complained about V1k vibration at higher speeds. It’s small, but persistent and annoying. Anyone with a persistent nose tingle can attest to this. In many cases, I find myself driving highways at 75-80 mph and barely keeping up with traffic. I started noticing my hand and arm tingling recently. After having previous carpal tunnel surgery, I began scrambling for a solution. This problem had to go away.

Like many, I started looking for new grips, vibration-isolating risers, gel gloves and anything else that might relieve my malady. Today I made a run from Fishers, In to Columbus, Oh - about 250 miles taking awesome backroads. However, I suspected something quite different might be the culprit. If nothing else, I wanted to eliminate it from consideration. What was different this trip was the addition of a Cramp Buster and the subtraction of my gloves. That’s right - I went hand commando today.

For those who don’t know, your median nerve that serves your hand runs through an area in your wrist called the carpal tunnel. When this nerve gets irritated, lots of undelicious things happen in your hand and sometimes parts of your arm - and lots of things can piss it off. Vibrations exascerbate this problem, but so can pressure on your hand that compresses the carpal tunnel itself.

As it turns out, my gloves were tight enough and cinched around my wrist tight enough to compress my carpal tunnel - and it sucked! I decided a few changes were in order. A Cramp Buster allowed me to use the side of my hand and reduce grip pressure on the throttle - a brilliant piece of gear for $10! I also went sans gloves today. Admittedly, that’s not the smartest thing to do, I know.

After 250 miles or so today with a Cramp Buster and no gloves, no more tingling! So, before you go to the expense of building a vibration-isolated bike, do this test and see how you feel after a ride. It may not be your bike after all.

I will be looking for a glove that places no pressure on my wrist tomorrow.:grin2:

Hope this helps.
 

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Changing the angle of the bars can help with positioning. Rotate them up or down. I found rotating them up has helped reduce or eliminate tingling. Or bar risers to move them higher or closer.
 

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I actually noticed a significant decrease in hand and wrist discomfort just by installing a set of heated grips. No, not the heat...the larger diameter of the grips is what made a huge difference. I guess they just fill the hand better, and help transfer any vibes/pressure over a larger area? Oh, and they are no softer than the stock grips either, just bigger dia. Something to consider/try?
 

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Changing the angle of the bars can help with positioning. Rotate them up or down. I found rotating them up has helped reduce or eliminate tingling. Or bar risers to move them higher or closer.
And it doesn't take MUCH - probably as little as 5 degrees or so.
 

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And it doesn't take MUCH - probably as little as 5 degrees or so.
Yes, thanks to your comment on another thread I tried rotating the bars. If you've ever seen the ram's horn controls of an Embraer then you'll know what I was trying to achieve, a more natural wrist and elbow position. But rotating the bars to point the tips more towards the ground made my numb hand problem worse! So I rotated them the other way and essentially solved the numbness.

I'd guess about 10 degrees or a bit less was how much adjustment they needed.
 
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