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Discussion Starter #1
The axle sliders we get there in Thailand are either local crap or expensive and sometimes not that great either, so I decided to make my own.

Rather than a common low tensile steel tie rod or cheesy bit of redi rod, this one is made out of high tensile steel. The nut is a stainless acorn nut.

Note how the aluminium bushings spigot both into the axle and slider in order to take the load on the fork/bushing and not snap off the tie rod when you need it the most
Sliders are common skate board wheels, tough, cheap to replace and readily available

Cost 50.00 but far better than what I can buy here
 

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Nice install but I'm not sure how much real protection these will offer in a slide although they might offer some additional protection to a bike that already has crash bars. I've low sided my Versys at about 65kph and it slid on it's side about 50-100ft. The SW-Motech engine bars basically saved the bike and were the main pressure point with the bike on it's side. The rear spool must have hit and broke off (the welded mounting tab ripped off from the swing arm). The handle bars bent but the Barkbuster hand guards protected the controls. The upper fairing was rashed but not fatally damaged as it was not a main pressure point. The front forks never touched nor did the rear hub (may have been protected by spool) so I am not sure how much real protection these will offer in a real crash situation although I'm sure they'll be better than nothing. IMO if you want crash protection crash bars should be a prime consideration.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have crash bars and agree that they are great protection.

The idea of a fork slider is to protect the brakes and fork from road rash
Cheap insurance IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
durometer is 101A. Not sure how they determine that as Shore A only goes to 100 and anything over 95 is inaccurate. I suspect that they are extrapolating from the Shore B scale and marketing to a non-engineering type

diameter is 50mm
 

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Looks great! I like the idea of saving my forks and attached parts from rash in tip-over.

Probably stupid questions, but here goes. . . .

:feedback:

Do the skateboard wheels turn in this application? If they do turn, is that considered to be an advantage, or just a side-affect of re-purposing them as sliders? Would a plain ol' piece of plastic or aluminum work as well?

Full disclosure--riding season is nowhere near around here, and I'm taking a shop class. Always looking for more projects! :yeahsmile:

thanks,

GDI
 

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The skateboard wheels do no turn. They are bolted on tight without wheel bearings.

Plastic would be ground down too easily. They do make some swingarm sliders out of aluminum. Real fork sliders are made of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, like high durometer skateboard wheels which slide better without wearing down or snagging as much as aluminum would.
 

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The skateboard wheels do no turn. They are bolted on tight without wheel bearings.

Plastic would be ground down too easily. They do make some swingarm sliders out of aluminum. Real fork sliders are made of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene like high durometer skateboard wheels which slide better without wearing down or snagging as much as aluminum would.
Thanks for the info. I think I may have some UHMW laying around here somewhere that I could use.

GDI
 
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