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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I thought I'd post up what I've decided to do to lower my 2015 650lt. I did email with Speedy, great guy, but for various and justifiable (to me) reasons I chose to go with the hyperpro lowering spring. Is this the right way to go? I dunno, I'll let you know. Regardless, I have to come down from scraping the clouds a bit. I have Hyperpro springs on my k1200lt, and they really transformed the bike. hopefully it will work like that again, but we'll see. It'll take a couple weeks for the springs to get here, so I will follow up then, Thanks for all the advise and help - Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Well that was easy!

I installed the hyperpro rear spring today. first, lacking a centerstand, I did the next best thing, I ran a 1/2" steel rod through the lower bag support brackets and jammed the frame against the rear tire. Held the bike perfectly for removing the shock. I found the hydraulic line for the preload adjuster is run circuitously through the frame so I just backed the adjuster all the way off and removed the line fitting fron the adjuster. Didn't lose any fluid at all. At this point removing the shock was as easy as it gets.

I made up a compressor tool with a transmission bearing removal tool I've had for a couple decades. I mounted it up in my vise, inserted the shock, and the spring removal / reinstallation was a breeze.

The shock went back into the bike like it belonged there (well, it did!) and I tightened everything back up. Pulled the steel bar out and the rear was done. I then lowered the front .600" ... the forks were already .500" above the top triple, I don't know if that's stock or not, but I didn't want to go to far, and I wanted to match the front lowering to the rear - stated is 1 - 1.2".

The bike is still high when on the stand or mounting. Of course once on, the hyperpro spring is more compliant and has more sag than the stock spring. Honestly, the back seems to be sprung more closely to the front now. It's typical of stock suspension... about all it does is hold the bike off the tires, but hey, you get what you pay for.

Test riding reveals all I'd hoped. I'm not flatfooting, but not scraping the sky, either. I can put my feet down comfortably enough and don't get the feeling the bike could get away from me. Handling is about the same as stock.

Farkle #1... success.

Steve
 

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Well done!
Did you notice any difference in lengths between the OEM spring and the Hyperpro one?
 

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Well that was easy!

I installed the hyperpro rear spring today. first, lacking a centerstand, I did the next best thing, I ran a 1/2" steel rod through the lower bag support brackets and jammed the frame against the rear tire. Held the bike perfectly for removing the shock. I found the hydraulic line for the preload adjuster is run circuitously through the frame so I just backed the adjuster all the way off and removed the line fitting fron the adjuster. Didn't lose any fluid at all. At this point removing the shock was as easy as it gets.

I made up a compressor tool with a transmission bearing removal tool I've had for a couple decades. I mounted it up in my vise, inserted the shock, and the spring removal / reinstallation was a breeze.

The shock went back into the bike like it belonged there (well, it did!) and I tightened everything back up. Pulled the steel bar out and the rear was done. I then lowered the front .600" ... the forks were already .500" above the top triple, I don't know if that's stock or not, but I didn't want to go to far, and I wanted to match the front lowering to the rear - stated is 1 - 1.2".

The bike is still high when on the stand or mounting. Of course once on, the hyperpro spring is more compliant and has more sag than the stock spring. Honestly, the back seems to be sprung more closely to the front now. It's typical of stock suspension... about all it does is hold the bike off the tires, but hey, you get what you pay for.

Test riding reveals all I'd hoped. I'm not flatfooting, but not scraping the sky, either. I can put my feet down comfortably enough and don't get the feeling the bike could get away from me. Handling is about the same as stock.

Farkle #1... success.

Steve
I'm gonna have to swing by and check that out. Or ya wanna meet up at Sleepy Hollow tomorrow? I'm buying. I'll shoot ya an email.

Later, SteveJ.
 

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My thoughts and experience with lowered first generation versys 650. When I bought my 08 Versys 650 it had the Motorwerk lowering block on the rear and it was also lowered some on the front forks. The Motorwerk part hole to hole measures 1.5", so it should lower the 33 " seat, that amount from the ground. The rear shock adjuster was set in the middle position, which is what the manual recommends for a 150 lb rider. Riding the bike it was way too stiff. As to me I'm 5'11", 220 without riding gear and have about a 30-31" inseam on a good day. Even with the lowering link I had trouble swinging my leg over the seat and often would just use the left peg to mount the bike. I'm no spring chicken, which doesn't help in the mounting department.
So I took everything off the bike that was lowered, rear lowering block, shorter side stand and raised the front forks up to the 12 mm mark. I found that I could swing my leg over when dismounting, but had to use the left peg to mount the bike. So I put all the lowering stuff back on again and was just able to mount from the ground, but my boot would always hit the seat mounting and dismounting.So I took everything off the bike and put it back to stock. The balls of my feet are in contact with the ground and I can flat foot one leg or the other. So balancing the bike even with the stock suspension is OK.
I never really noticed any handling difference between the lowered and stock bike, but the lowered stock shock was just too harsh. The lowering block changes the angle that the shock works, which affects its function. It just doesn't have the same travel until it goes harsh, it seems to lose that initial sag. With my inseam the lowering block really didn't make it any easier to mount the bike from the ground. So I have gone back to the stock set up and use the left peg to mount. If I had anything on the passenger seat, I'd have to use the peg, with or without the lowering block. The ride is noticeably better without the block and it is easier to get the initial sag right on the adjuster. I'm currently running the rear in the 3rd spot from the softest and dampening about the middle of the pack.
I'm not knocking the product, just that depending on your inseam the lowering block may or may not help. If you have the money a professional built shortened rear shock, based on your weight would be the way to go. I've tried off the shelf lowered shocks on one other bike and I found with my weight I was between adjusters and it was either to soft or too hard.
 

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I lowered my 2015 this year with Speedy's kit.

I always kept the rear preload at zero except when loaded up for camping, and then it is somewhere in the middle. The front I have kept pretty soft with a relatively short rebound, about 1-1.5 bounces on rebound. This has been comfortable and a good compromise for my riding. Mostly around town or commuting on the highway to work, with the occasional mountain twisty (but I am not racing along on those).

With the lowering kit the handling is slightly different but I can't really explain it. Much less of a tipping over into the turn at the beginning of a turn. It feels a bit quicker turning as a result. Being lower there is less distance to go when leaning. But it also feels a bit tighter in handling.

But the big difference was needing to stiffen the suspension for highway riding. Especially the front compression (preload) needed to be significantly increased. The bike was doing some bobbling on twisty mountain highways when encountering a bump while turning. I am guessing this was a function of having a shorter wheelbase and slightly more angle (rake?) because the front doesn't get lowered quite as much as the rear.

The rear preload also needed to be increased by a few turns.
 

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I lowered my 2015 this year with Speedy's kit.

I always kept the rear preload at zero except when loaded up for camping, and then it is somewhere in the middle. The front I have kept pretty soft with a relatively short rebound, about 1-1.5 bounces on rebound. This has been comfortable and a good compromise for my riding. Mostly around town or commuting on the highway to work, with the occasional mountain twisty (but I am not racing along on those).

With the lowering kit the handling is slightly different but I can't really explain it. Much less of a tipping over into the turn at the beginning of a turn. It feels a bit quicker turning as a result. Being lower there is less distance to go when leaning. But it also feels a bit tighter in handling.

But the big difference was needing to stiffen the suspension for highway riding. Especially the front compression (preload) needed to be significantly increased. The bike was doing some bobbling on twisty mountain highways when encountering a bump while turning. I am guessing this was a function of having a shorter wheelbase and slightly more angle (rake?) because the front doesn't get lowered quite as much as the rear.

The rear preload also needed to be increased by a few turns.
What are your settings?
 
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