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Discussion Starter #1
Where the best place to order one and a rear sprocket, I have a new 16t front. I have a Tusk Rivet press and can do the job.

I can't remember if I put a EK to RK on the KLR. What the better setup for all around use? I do know I want a steel rear sprocket, it not a race bike and I'd rather have the drive train last.

Seems strange but everything was fine last week this week it's all gone to pot.
 

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Likely your bike doesn't need a new rear sprocket, the rear sprocket will usually out last a couple of chains and front sprockets. If it make you feel better you can flip it over. I like D.I.D. chains. You can get a VX2 a Amazon for less than $80.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, Mac-man. I may go that way.

Waltermitty, I replace the whole driveline as it's cheaper in the long run than trying to save a few pennies by not replacing the sprockets and just wearing out a new chain quickly. Use to be the chain was the cheap part NOW the chain is the spendy thing and the sprockets are the cheap parts to replace. I may change to a smaller rear one anyway to get a lower RPM at the fast cruise I like to run at.
 

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Thanks, Mac-man. I may go that way.

Waltermitty, I replace the whole driveline as it's cheaper in the long run than trying to save a few pennies by not replacing the sprockets and just wearing out a new chain quickly. Use to be the chain was the cheap part NOW the chain is the spendy thing and the sprockets are the cheap parts to replace. I may change to a smaller rear one anyway to get a lower RPM at the fast cruise I like to run at.
Yeah, I agree with that. I was always told to replace both sprockets and the chain all at the same time. Something about how they break in together, and just replacing one will cause increased wear on the others. Dunno. I've seen the results of a broken chain. Not worth it to me to try and save a few bucks by changing one, or flipping a sprocket, etc. But that's just me...
As I'd mentioned, if you need all three, motomummy has great deals on a package. I have the RK rivet tool, so I get the chain kit from mummy, and replace it myself.
The Pitbull sprockets are reasonably priced, I may try those next time. If they have them for the Versys. Gonna get them for my gixxer.

Edit: Never mind on motomummy...seems to be just sportbike stuff. I replace stuff so often on my gsxr track bike. Well, when the time comes, I'll be looking for places to purchase for the V!
 

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Edit: Never mind on motomummy...seems to be just sportbike stuff. I replace stuff so often on my gsxr track bike. Well, when the time comes, I'll be looking for places to purchase for the V!
Just choose the Ninja 650 stuff,and adjust the gearing to what you want. I have several parts on my bike that are for the 650R, instead of a V.
 

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Just choose the Ninja 650 stuff,and adjust the gearing to what you want. I have several parts on my bike that are for the 650R, instead of a V.
Perfect, thanks for the heads-up! I hadn't researched that!:thumb:
I did find out that brake pads for SV650s fit,'99-'09, enabling me to get Vesrah RJLs.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Looks like all the rear sprockets Motomunny have are alu. I want a steel one as alu wear out way too fast for my taste, cheap!
 

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It's just money. The rear sprockets last much longer because they only do about 1/3 the work of the front, 46/15 = 3.0667. The factory spockets are very high quality, not so much some of the aftermarket. Avoid aluminum sprockets like the plague unless you race dirt bikes.

An old trick it to just flip the rear sprocket. All wear occurs on the front of the teeth so when you flip it you are back to new pitch.
 

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Looks like all the rear sprockets Motomunny have are alu. I want a steel one as alu wear out way too fast for my taste, cheap!
I thought he had some that were lightweight steel, but maybe not for all applications. FWIW, I've gotten good wear from the hardened aluminum ones on the racetrack, but I'm not sure what that translates into for mileage.
 

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Proof by assertion. It perfectly explains why people believe things that are not true, but it usually only works for things people don't put much effort in or where there is no much evidence.


But, I wonder why, with so much evidence of the contrary, including the OEM service manuals, people still believe the "change the chain and sprockets as a set" myth?
 

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...But, I wonder why, with so much evidence of the contrary, including the OEM service manuals, people still believe the "change the chain and sprockets as a set" myth?
Probably because they hear THAT from so many sources, and not being very mechanical, take it as "gospel". It certainly helps the aftermarket places to 'print' $...!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Probably because they hear THAT from so many sources, and not being very mechanical, take it as "gospel". It certainly helps the aftermarket places to 'print' $...!
Well my front and rear sprockets were both showing signs of "Hooking" but the more I clean things up it's not as bad as I thought on the rear so it may get flipped. The front? I have on hand a 16t that I'll install.

Not all the bikes I've had could you flip the rear sprocket because of how they were made and mounted. And some like the Buell had no chain or sprockets, belt and pulleys. And a Couple of Shafties just change the final drive oil.
 

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Personally, I'm plenty mechanical. I also rely on the opinions of trusted sources who aren't trying to make me purchase things before necessary. If I've gotten 20k miles out of a chain/sprocket combo, I see no reason to cheap out over a $60 rear sprocket, I've seen the effects of a broken chain. Not worth it to me. To each his own. We all have opinions on what to do with our bikes, all good.
 

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Well my front and rear sprockets were both showing signs of "Hooking" but the more I clean things up it's not as bad as I thought on the rear so it may get flipped. The front? I have on hand a 16t that I'll install.

Not all the bikes I've had could you flip the rear sprocket because of how they were made and mounted. And some like the Buell had no chain or sprockets, belt and pulleys. And a Couple of Shafties just change the final drive oil.
Hooking happens when you ride on a chain that is stretched past it's limits as the sprocket teeth get worn by the links that are a longer pitch (pitch increases as the chain wears). I change my chains WAY before that. I suck at chain maintenance, so usually my chains die due to stiff links, not stretching, that also means that my sprockets outlast not just one, but several chains.

I really want to try a chain oiler.
 
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