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Discussion Starter #1
Planning a trip this summer, probably from NY to CO or Wyoming or both...

First ever long distance trip on a bike... I know alot of members do long hauls, so i'm here, all ears for advice, equipment suggestions, and anything else you can think of!

So far what i've got:
luggage OTW
GPS+12V
plan on getting a tire plugger and an air pump
Chain lube

So what else should i be bringing???

Thanks ahead of time folks! :D
 

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I found a cheap one person tent to save on hotel costs, a few dry bags (BAJA brand is made in Seattle, WA and really good quality), small compact sleeping bag, and if possible wearing out your tire to have a new one start on the trip instead of having to get it switched out part way through.... depending on how fast you go through tires and how many miles you put on the tire. There is a SPOT gps unit that I would recommend if your by yourself on the trip. That way should anything happen and you don't have cellphone signal but you can get a GPS signal out you can be found if you are in trouble. First aide kit. Point and shoot camera if you plan to take a lot of pictures along the way.



and if you have room never forget an inflatable raft. Never know what the weather will do :p.

I am actually on day 2 (almost 3) of a 10-14 day road trip.

I had everything in a single dry bag but then I just bought Happy-Trails Teton 9" wide luggage and everything that was in the dry bag fits in the panniers. I plan to jot down other things that I can think of along the trip.
 

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We need a little more info- how are you travelling? camping? hotels? Interstates? Backroads? Gravel?

That will effect what you bring along...

Regardless, start with what you wear riding- Waterproof, protective gear is a must. Including gloves and boots. And make sure you can wear your helmet for hours at a time- it's a lot different than wearing it for an hour joyride. Figure out if you want/need music, and how you'll deliver it. Figure out what tools you're comfortable with or without. Throw in a pair of rubber gloves if you don't want to get your hands dirty.
Think about how you will charge your phone/electronic devices if you're camping. Figure out what you're going to do after dark if you're camping-books, music, movies? Bring a headlight- you'll be surprised how much you'll use it, and the new LED lights are tiny. What batteries do you need?
That's a start.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
We need a little more info- how are you travelling? camping? hotels? Interstates? Backroads? Gravel?

That will effect what you bring along...

Regardless, start with what you wear riding- Waterproof, protective gear is a must. Including gloves and boots. And make sure you can wear your helmet for hours at a time- it's a lot different than wearing it for an hour joyride. Figure out if you want/need music, and how you'll deliver it. Figure out what tools you're comfortable with or without. Throw in a pair of rubber gloves if you don't want to get your hands dirty.
Think about how you will charge your phone/electronic devices if you're camping. Figure out what you're going to do after dark if you're camping-books, music, movies? Bring a headlight- you'll be surprised how much you'll use it, and the new LED lights are tiny. What batteries do you need?
That's a start.
Probably a mix of camping and hotels, trying to keep off highways as much as possible.

Definitely good advice though, already added alot of stuff to my list :thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I found a cheap one person tent to save on hotel costs, a few dry bags (BAJA brand is made in Seattle, WA and really good quality), small compact sleeping bag, and if possible wearing out your tire to have a new one start on the trip instead of having to get it switched out part way through.... depending on how fast you go through tires and how many miles you put on the tire. There is a SPOT gps unit that I would recommend if your by yourself on the trip. That way should anything happen and you don't have cellphone signal but you can get a GPS signal out you can be found if you are in trouble. First aide kit. Point and shoot camera if you plan to take a lot of pictures along the way.



and if you have room never forget an inflatable raft. Never know what the weather will do :p.

I am actually on day 2 (almost 3) of a 10-14 day road trip.

I had everything in a single dry bag but then I just bought Happy-Trails Teton 9" wide luggage and everything that was in the dry bag fits in the panniers. I plan to jot down other things that I can think of along the trip.
Just put two new Angel ST's on last week :D And i was actually just looking at those SPOT devices earlier, and was going to ask if anyone used them lol.
First aid def needs to go on my list

Drift action vid cam will be coming with me and the best digital camera i own is probably on my iphone lol.

Glad to see others are out and about on trips as well, hope you're enjoying it:thumb:
 

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So far what i've got:
luggage OTW
GPS+12V
plan on getting a tire plugger and an air pump
Chain lube

So what else should i be bringing???

Thanks ahead of time folks! :D
Definitely a Tire repair kit, (the rope plugs), and a method of inflating them, (I use compressed air cartridges), and pressure guage.
First aid kit
My bike's got high miles, so i carry a clutch cable. If you're really paranoid, you could carry a stator, (overkill, IMO).
Some water.
rain gear
Leatherman or similar tool
I bent my wrench for the rear axle, so I carry a real wrench, same size.
I also carry an adjustable wrench.
Make a radiator guard out of gutter netting, or buy the factory made version.
Engine guards are good.
If you're riding in the Rockies, it can get cold. Bring a fleece sweater.
Maps, (in case your GPS fails), although less of an issue in the US than here in Mexico.
I carry a headlamp for night time work on the bike and reading if you're sharing a room.
Put a $20/50/100 dollar bill or extra credit card under one of your insoles or stashed in some other unlikely place unlikely, (in case you lose your wallet, get mugged, etc.)
Write emergency contact phone #s down in case your cell phone fails.
I carry something like this, (my current one is made out of plastic and they're a lot cheaper than a centerstand), so you can lube your chain easily, and by yourself:






Have a great trip!
 

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Definitely a Tire repair kit, (the rope plugs), and a method of inflating them, (I use compressed air cartridges), and pressure guage.
Agree...You know, I’ve never gotten a nail in a tire in decades of touring on motorcycles…until last week, in the middle of Nowhere, Texas (that’s near Junction btw), 1,300 miles away from home. Man, was I glad to be carrying a simple tire plugging kit (a few bucks from Autozone) and a Slime Air Compressor ($40). Yeah, I have AMA roadside assistance, but who knows when/if they're going to show. I had that tire plugged, inflated and I was on my way in thirty minutes…tire held pressure all the way home. Don't leave home without it. :)
 

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I have the Mini Foot Pump, (A Vicious Cycle $16) came with a bag that also has room for my plug kit tools. I have an Outbound Microlite Mummy 2 lbs sleeping bag (very compact, Canadian Tire $45) and a 1 man waterproof bivy tent from Aqua Quest. (Also very compact, ebay $125) All three of these items fit in one Givi E21 side case with room to spare:



This is the home made "Turnbuckle Jack" I use the raise the rear tire:



And, don't forget rain gear. Good quality rain suit and boot covers. I wear neoprene paddle gloves in the rain. I tried to make a standard industrial rain suit work on the bike, but it didn't. Good Hi-vis, but it was heavy, hard to use with gloves, and the bib over-alls had a slit fly, so the crotch leaked when you sat. Not good.
 

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A throttle lock is helpful, for relieving my right hand, adjusting my jacket vents, gloves, etc. Also, a Givi windscreen. On long trips, I shift my weight around on my Corbin seat by leaning forward and put my feet up on the passenger pegs, and prop my left hand/arm on the dash or tank.
 

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If you don't have a set of handguards, then bring one of each levers. A simple fall over in the parking lot someplace can ruion a persons day trying to source a new lever somewhere.

I also carry a firestarter stick of somekind incase all the nearby wood is damp.

Need I mention a roll of TP? Put a roll in a ziplock bag. It can be a life, er sock, savor for sure:D
 

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Even though I ride with a GPS, I always carry paper maps. I have learned this by not having the proper maps loaded on the gps, so if I decide to change direction, i'm lost! :eek:

I also always ride with a camelbak to stay hydrated and carry a Spot gps locator. My husband likes knowing how long i'm at Starbucks in some strange location. :p

I mainly do distance riding, however I do not camp since I am solo. I believe camping adds another dimension to packing the bike.
 

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There is a TON of this information on advrider.com. I would do some browsing and searching over there depending on your focus, camping, hotelling, etc. There is plenty of detail, from spares to clothes, to how to pack, everything you could ever want to know.

Weight is your enemy. If you bring too much gear along you'll be overweighted which detracts from the experience. Lightweight backpacking gear is the answer.

Be sure to do some shake-down trips beforehand to fine-tune your processes. That way you'll enjoy your big trip much more by being prepared.

BTW, don't forget to bring a spare ignition key. :D
 

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A throttle lock is helpful, for relieving my right hand, adjusting my jacket vents, gloves, etc. Also, a Givi windscreen. On long trips, I shift my weight around on my Corbin seat by leaning forward and put my feet up on the passenger pegs, and prop my left hand/arm on the dash or tank.
Haha...what? Can we get a picture of this? Sounds incredibly awkward to me...if you're serious...
 

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Call your credit card companies before you leave and tell them you when will be traveling and where so you are not declined at a gas station due to unusual activity. Exxon has decided unilaterally to stop accepting some of my cards for purchases later the same day although the card was still accepted everywhere else.
 

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Call your credit card companies before you leave and tell them you when will be traveling and where so you are not declined at a gas station due to unusual activity. Exxon has decided unilaterally to stop accepting some of my cards for purchases later the same day although the card was still accepted everywhere else.
+1
 
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