Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

Are you interested in this product?


  • Total voters
    30
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
LED Water Temperature Indicator

I'm working on an LED temperature indicator for my V.

Basically it is a single tri color LED, that will be mounted to the dash.

It will show blue below about 160 DegF, green when in the normal operating temperature, and red when overheating (matching up with normal indicator light). I can possibly make it show yellow or some other color before it goes to red, possibly when the fan comes on. It is very simple, and easy to read. Not an exact number but better than just the light we have now. I am aslo working on making it dim automatically at night.

Working out the coding now (all that freshman year college stuff is coming back, slowly), but hope to have it working sometime in December.

For reference, it would look something like this (Panel mount LED shown on Ninja 650, green one on the bottom.)


You would need to drill a 1/4" hole in the dash, and mount a box about 2"x2"x1" somewhere on the bike. You would need 12V power, and ground, and tap into a temp sensor wire (on the back of the cylinder head).

I'm making one for myself no matter what, and one for a friend, but I was trying to see if there was any interest from others (basically is it worth me investing in having a circuit board made). I haven't finalized it yet, but I'm thinking it would be about $45-50. Anyone interested?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I already have the voltage indicator, that is what got me thinking of this.

I really am not concerned with overheating, and there is another light there for that already. I just wanted an indication of when the engine warms up, especially as I continue to ride through the winter.

I could probably sell the pair of voltage and water temp for about $75. I use the Signal Dynamics LED Voltmeter, but will replace the LED with a 5MM unit to make them match.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Err.. One question! How do we know the stock temp light is working? It never lit up even during meter cluster/gauge self diagnose for fault.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
I voted no.

But a small triple gauge, that was accurate, and showed oil pressure, water temp, and battery voltage, I would buy.
I hate lights, and its not going to show me what ireally want to know, like when my thermostat is opening or closing, what exactly my fan is coming on at for temp, etc.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,395 Posts
FWIW - those with KLRs probably have heard of the "Thermo-Bob" made by Bill Watson. Kawi makes their cooling systems with either NO bypass, or an inadequate one, so the coolant heats up, the thermostat opens, and a slug of cooler coolant enters the engine (on KLRs you can watch the temp needle fluctuate as you ride on other-than hot days). This AIN'T great for your engine, and I know Bill did research on, and came up with, a "Thermo-Bob" kit for the Versys. (When I find his web-site I'll add it.) :goodidea:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Here's my problem. I am red-green color blind (about 1 in 11 men are). I cannot tell the difference between a red, a green, and a yellow LED. Makes me nuts, but I deal. So if you could figure a way to do this by say a count of the LED's (1 if <=160 , 2 i f normal, 3 if overheated), that would be good.

-- Hank

P.S. I have no trouble with traffic lights, so no need to stay far away . . . . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
842 Posts
Here's my problem. I am red-green color blind (about 1 in 11 men are). I cannot tell the difference between a red, a green, and a yellow LED. P.S. I have no trouble with traffic lights, so no need to stay far away . . . . .
Hi Hank

+1

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,411 Posts
FWIW - those with KLRs probably have heard of the "Thermo-Bob" made by Bill Watson. Kawi makes their cooling systems with either NO bypass, or an inadequate one, so the coolant heats up, the thermostat opens, and a slug of cooler coolant enters the engine (on KLRs you can watch the temp needle fluctuate as you ride on other-than hot days). This AIN'T great for your engine, and I know Bill did research on, and came up with, a "Thermo-Bob" kit for the Versys. (When I find his web-site I'll add it.) :goodidea:

HERE !

LOP
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,395 Posts
Three pictures for you. The V hoses are quite short, so the Tee goes in the
left hose (picture 5559), the Thermo-Bob in the right hose (picture 5563),
the bypass connects them of course (picture 5564). The other .jpg is of a series of tests Bill did, with a Versys set up with thermocouples to check coolant temps, before (the Thermo-Bob), and after (with it installed), over the SAME test routing and times.
As you can see, temps AFTER are where they should be! :goodidea:
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,186 Posts
Three pictures for you. The V hoses are quite short, so the Tee goes in the
left hose (picture 5559), the Thermo-Bob in the right hose (picture 5563),
the bypass connects them of course (picture 5564). The other .jpg is of a series of tests Bill did, with a Versys set up with thermocouples to check coolant temps, before (the Thermo-Bob), and after (with it installed), over the SAME test routing and times.
As you can see, temps AFTER are where they should be! :goodidea:
Looks like a simple and clean install. how is yours working??? Like this with the temps we have here in texas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
459 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Back on topic.

Almost have all the pieces I need to build the first part. Someone on the UK site asked for a second LED that would come on when ambient temperatrues were below freezing and would blink when temps were -5 DegC (23 DegF). I might look into that, but for starters it will just be for engine temperature.

Sorry to hsfarber and any other color blind members, but this will only be one LED. There is another one available (but pretty expensive, about $105 shipped if my conversions are correct) that uses multiple LEDs. Information Here
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,395 Posts
Looks like a simple and clean install. how is yours working??? Like this with the temps we have here in texas.
Put one into the KLR, but not YET into the V - soon...! :goodidea:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,191 Posts
Just curious if anyone else has tried this in the V, and if there is any effect on the fan control, as it has been stated that the T stat that comes with it is a 195, OEM is close to 160.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,000 Posts
Temperature sensor in on the head's lower rear, just above left cylinder. Coolant temperature warning light is set to go on if coolant temperature reaches 239°F (115°C), but not if level gets too low. Cooling fan comes on at a coolant temperature of 196°F (91°C). Thermostat valve opens at 177-182°F (80.5-83.5°C). Full opening lift: 8 mm (0.31 in.) or more at 203°F (95°C).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,191 Posts
Thanks Invader
I was looking at the Thermo-Bob, this summer I had a lot of cycling with the fan. My thought is there is very little room between the open temperature of the stat and the cut in temperature for the fan.My concern comes from the fact that my son runs a Honda 919, riding with me, his fan rarely comes on, were my fan runs at every stop light on hot days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,186 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,000 Posts
Wow... I like this Thermo-Bob setup a lot. :thumb: It adds a coolant bypass which is normally used on liquid cooled engines to allow quicker warmup, stable coolant temperature flowing from bottom to head, and warmer oil temperature. It greatly reduces strain and wear on engine, as well as increase its efficiency. :clap:
I definitely want one. Perfect time to replace coolant as well.

http://www.members.cox.net/watt-man/TB order1.htm

See info, graphics and charts: http://members.cox.net/watt-man/TB Testing1.htm
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,191 Posts
Some of the electrical equipment I work on has a similar set up , it has a tempering valve, and coolant flows in a closed loop until the temperature starts to rise, very similar in that the opening of the tempering valve is proportional to the temperature rise. The main reason is to prevent going below the Dew point, as condensation and electricity don't mix very well.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top