Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought two LED lights from www.superbrightLEDs.com, and I also bought the wiring harness.

I installed everything easily, but now my battery is dead.

The wiring harness is really simple: it has ring terminals that go to the battery (a fuse on the positive), then the wires go to a relay, then they split out of the relay to each light and a lighted switch (the switch only lights when you turn the lights on).

There is no wire that comes out and goes to a "switched" hot, but I'm assuming that the relay is there to kill the power to the lights if the battery voltage drops below a certain point? Basically, after I installed them, I could turn the lights on and off even if my key was not in the ignition, which I don't really care about (I just won't leave them on, and if I do, the relay will kill them I guess).

So I can't figure out why the setup killed my battery. I actually pulled the battery out and charged it up for a few days, then reinstalled it and it is now dead again. So it is definitely these new LED lights, because I never had a problem before.

The only thing that I can think is that I need to bolt the relay onto a metal part of the motorcycle to ground it. It looks like that might be what you are supposed to do since it has a bright metal bolt hole protruding from the relay, but I can't really figure out why it would need to be grounded.

Here is the link to the wiring harness:

http://www.superbrightleds.com/moreinfo/wire-harness-relay/led-product/1979/4454/

Could somebody with more electrical knowledge take a look at it and let me know what you think?

As for the lights themselves, they are really beefy and bright, and much, much cheaper than the Denalis from Rigid.

Thanks,
Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,791 Posts
It takes power to close the relay allowing the lights to get power from the battery. The negative from the battery should go to the lights while the positive from the battery goes to the relay and then on to the lights. There needs to be a source of power tied in with the switch in order for the relay to close. This usually comes from a switched power source.

Without seeing the instructions it is hard to see what you actually wired up, and the harness doesn't give any indication because the wires are covered.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
The relay will not act as a low voltage cut off, I have my rigid LED`s wired the same as twowheeladdict. I have no problems with the battery. My Riged lights came with the same wire harness that you have , I modified the relay to be active only when the parking lamps are hot = +dcv. The above diagram is a verry good set up
also i purchased a 5 pole relay for the mod
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
P.S. the mounting tab on the relay does not ground it is just for mounting the relay
another P.S., you have a switch with a light in it,, the black wire on the switch.
if you need the light then move the back end of that wire to - ground
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Harness picture

OK, here is the picture of the harness.

There are clearly only 4 connections that need to be made: the black ring terminal goes to the battery's ground and the red ring terminal goes to the battery's positive.

The only other thing to do is plug the 2 lights into the ends of the harness and mount the switch.

There is NO wire that goes to "switched" hot.

If the relay doesn't need to be bolted to ground, then how could I have screwed this up?

And in this setup, what does the relay even do if it doesn't provide a low voltage cutoff?

I'm so confused!

Chris
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
All the relay does is keep the current for the lights from going through the switch. There is nothing that protects you in this setup from draining the battery when the bike is off. I generally like to tap off of a switched power source to provide the power for the relay (85 on your diagram)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
I bought the exact same harness from superbright for my led driving lights but I found it way too long and extra bulk for what I needed so I cut it up and used the components separately.
In my case and I believe yours, the relay isn't really necessary as the amp draw on two leds is very small but it is their standard harness. A relay is usually only necessary when the load is large and you would need heavier gauge wire otherwise. There is nothing wrong though using a relay anyways.
I personally think it may be a coincidence with your battery draining as you can't screw up with that pre-wired harness. If there was something wrong to drain your battery, the leds would stay on any you would notice them or if there was a short circuit the fuse would blow. Those are the only two scenarios I can see happening.
I did wire my relay to a switched source only as an extra precaution in case I left the switch on my mistake or anyone walking by could switch in on when you aren't there, unlikely but possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,535 Posts
I didn't notice anywhere that you disconnected the wiring harnes from the battery to verify if that was the real problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,466 Posts
Chrisfero

You have a lot of very good advice in those previous post


Usually, a relay is like a remote control, to separate the control (low current) from the power (high current), to prevent frying either the user or the switch


Try to figure out all those very good comment, maybe starting with BlackDog's one ...

Good luck

LOP
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,774 Posts
All the relay does is keep the current for the lights from going through the switch. There is nothing that protects you in this setup from draining the battery when the bike is off. I generally like to tap off of a switched power source to provide the power for the relay (85 on your diagram)
I ALWAYS use a "switched" circuit to 'power' my relays - generally from the front DRLs beside the headlight, or at the rear from the running lights. That way NO power gets thru UNLESS your ignition is selected ON, and, conversely, stops when selected to OFF.

:goodidea:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all of the replies.

I don't feel crazy anymore!

If I couldn't have screwed up the installation, then I'll disconnect the new wiring harness (and thus the lights) from the battery and see if my battery dies again.

The weird thing is that my battery reads 2 volts on my voltmeter! Which is the same reading that I got from my previous battery. Something is draining my battery down all the way to 2 freaking volts, and this happened immediately after I installed these new lights.

I don't know what the hell is going on...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Chris, Did you fix the problem? I took the above picture and modified it for what I saw in the harness. It seems to have a switch that lights when on. From that the 2 problems could be the switch or the relay. To test, on the switch, the three wires will be HOT (power) all the time, Ground, and the other will only have reading of power when switch is on. So if you disconnect the ground wire from switch, this removes power path. It will eliminate/or identify the switch as problem. The other id to replace the relay. It's a standard automotive relay the autoparts store sells. The 40 amp relay is overkill. If you have 2-20 watt LED lights, they only pull 3.3amps. Auto store standard is 30amp. should be fine. you would need to pull 360 watts to make 30amps. Hope you fix it.
Mike:goodluck:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
I made a contribution to the recently as well. But $13 will not save them.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top