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Shunt Regulator / LED Lighting / Available Watts / Total Watt output

Yes it is hard to grasp.First compare to a car alternator, that has a voltage regulator that outputs a small , say 15 watt into the rotating rotor, producing a magnetic field equal to what is needed to maintain your car electrics at say 13.6 to 14.2 VDC, the power going in is directly proportional to the electrical load or electrical demand. So if you were using your car for rally driving, daytime your alternator would be running what I call base load, lets say it is 400 watts, at night you are running rally lighting equal to say 346 watts, for a total of 746 watts. So at night your gas consumption will go up, generating electricity using a gas motor is about 50% efficient.1 horse power is equal to 746 watts. So at night you are using 1 HP however to get that at 50% efficiency you are using 2 HP to produce it, are you lost yet?
I am not going to calculate the daytime etc. , my point is during the day you will be using less gas.

Permanent magnet alternator
Which is what we have. Also we have a shunt regulator. I am going to explain a little different than I have ever done before, something to do with my Kubota 3500 watt generator and running at 60 HZ with a poor voltage regulator. So to get my generator to run at 60HZ there are two settings, on demand and ON, demand pulls in the throttle to increase speed when a load is introduced, something less than 50 watts won't do it, however at 100 watts it kicks into high, it is at 60 HZ but my VAC is like 135 VAC, so to bring the voltage down I hook my 2000 watt heat gun to it, which is a waste of energy, however if I was backing up my house I know I would have ample load and need not worry about over voltage. So that heat gun is equal to the shunt part of the regulator on the Versys, it waste energy to maintain voltage less than 15 volts DC, I have seen 15 volts DC for a good 5 seconds before the shunt kicked in using the OEM regulator, blow a headlight, notice fluctuation in lighting when going above 2000 RPM?
There have been at least 2 cases now on this forum where the stator / regulator took out the ECU and several fuses, not trying to scare anyone, let me say I was pissed that my 2015 650 ABS still had the square wheel stone age shunt regulator, no excuse other than it is cheap, my guess is it costs Kawasaki about $15, a Polaris 4012941 probably would cost them about $30, now that they are obsolete, the new 4016868 would probably be the same $30.
So the fact that the rotor is permanent magnet, the field is fixed, so two factors come into play, RPM which is = work done, the higher the RPM the greater the work done. The copper/ iron has what is called saturation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturation_(magnetic) briefly this is the point where a increase in speed or a increase in the strength of the magnetic field will make no difference in the wattage output. The Versys is roughly 24 amp at 336 Watts.Going further, if you are at 4000 RPM or 6000 RPM, you are at maximum output, increasing to 8000 RPM or higher will make no difference. Doing the Polaris 4016868 , I found at roughly 3500 RPM I was able to get max. out.
So adding led lighting / replacing incandescent lights with LED will reduce base load and make more power available. I stated my base load is 162 watts, say your base load is 200 watts, if changing to led lighting is possible , a good one is the city lights, a gain of almost 10 watts. So say you do the change and your bike now has a base load say 160 watts, you have freed up 40 watts for heated gear.
Confused? Keep in mind your total available watts no matter what regulator you are using is 336 watts at or above 3500 RPM.
Her we go, you have a 2015 650 ABS and so do I, you have the OEM regulator , I have my Polaris 4016868. we have identical base loads of 162 watts.We throw a amprobe on your dc output at 3500 RPM with a measured voltage for calculation purposes it is 14.2 VDC , your bike is producing a current of 23.6 amp DC. My bike measures 11.4 amp, or almost less than half, we go for a ride, identical weight and identical everything, guess what I get better gas mileage because your regulator is wasting 174 watts of energy that is produced in the form of heat. I have very detailed explanations in the How To Forum, every once in a while I think of another way of explaining things.
 

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Sorry for my ignorance, but I'm a bit new to this. I have a 2019 Versys 300. Do I have LED lights? I assume they are brighter. How much will it cost? I just bought a headlight modulator to be more visible. Should I have bought LED lights instead. What I would really like is a flashing rear light independent of the brake. Is that possible? Not sure it is legal though.
 

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Sorry for my ignorance, but I'm a bit new to this. I have a 2019 Versys 300. Do I have LED lights? I assume they are brighter. How much will it cost? I just bought a headlight modulator to be more visible. Should I have bought LED lights instead. What I would really like is a flashing rear light independent of the brake. Is that possible? Not sure it is legal though.
No, you do not have LED! You could fit LED headlight bulb plus the 2 little parking light bulbs. The LED bulb for the brake light is also available, as well as for the turn signals.
 

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Shunt Regulator / LED Lighting / Available Watts / Total Watt output

Yes it is hard to grasp.First compare to a car alternator, that has a voltage regulator that outputs a small , say 15 watt into the rotating rotor, producing a magnetic field equal to what is needed to maintain your car electrics at say 13.6 to 14.2 VDC, the power going in is directly proportional to the electrical load or electrical demand. So if you were using your car for rally driving, daytime your alternator would be running what I call base load, lets say it is 400 watts, at night you are running rally lighting equal to say 346 watts, for a total of 746 watts. So at night your gas consumption will go up, generating electricity using a gas motor is about 50% efficient.1 horse power is equal to 746 watts. So at night you are using 1 HP however to get that at 50% efficiency you are using 2 HP to produce it, are you lost yet?
I am not going to calculate the daytime etc. , my point is during the day you will be using less gas.

Permanent magnet alternator
Which is what we have. Also we have a shunt regulator. I am going to explain a little different than I have ever done before, something to do with my Kubota 3500 watt generator and running at 60 HZ with a poor voltage regulator. So to get my generator to run at 60HZ there are two settings, on demand and ON, demand pulls in the throttle to increase speed when a load is introduced, something less than 50 watts won't do it, however at 100 watts it kicks into high, it is at 60 HZ but my VAC is like 135 VAC, so to bring the voltage down I hook my 2000 watt heat gun to it, which is a waste of energy, however if I was backing up my house I know I would have ample load and need not worry about over voltage. So that heat gun is equal to the shunt part of the regulator on the Versys, it waste energy to maintain voltage less than 15 volts DC, I have seen 15 volts DC for a good 5 seconds before the shunt kicked in using the OEM regulator, blow a headlight, notice fluctuation in lighting when going above 2000 RPM?
There have been at least 2 cases now on this forum where the stator / regulator took out the ECU and several fuses, not trying to scare anyone, let me say I was pissed that my 2015 650 ABS still had the square wheel stone age shunt regulator, no excuse other than it is cheap, my guess is it costs Kawasaki about $15, a Polaris 4012941 probably would cost them about $30, now that they are obsolete, the new 4016868 would probably be the same $30.
So the fact that the rotor is permanent magnet, the field is fixed, so two factors come into play, RPM which is = work done, the higher the RPM the greater the work done. The copper/ iron has what is called saturation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturation_(magnetic) briefly this is the point where a increase in speed or a increase in the strength of the magnetic field will make no difference in the wattage output. The Versys is roughly 24 amp at 336 Watts.Going further, if you are at 4000 RPM or 6000 RPM, you are at maximum output, increasing to 8000 RPM or higher will make no difference. Doing the Polaris 4016868 , I found at roughly 3500 RPM I was able to get max. out.
So adding led lighting / replacing incandescent lights with LED will reduce base load and make more power available. I stated my base load is 162 watts, say your base load is 200 watts, if changing to led lighting is possible , a good one is the city lights, a gain of almost 10 watts. So say you do the change and your bike now has a base load say 160 watts, you have freed up 40 watts for heated gear.
Confused? Keep in mind your total available watts no matter what regulator you are using is 336 watts at or above 3500 RPM.
Her we go, you have a 2015 650 ABS and so do I, you have the OEM regulator , I have my Polaris 4016868. we have identical base loads of 162 watts.We throw a amprobe on your dc output at 3500 RPM with a measured voltage for calculation purposes it is 14.2 VDC , your bike is producing a current of 23.6 amp DC. My bike measures 11.4 amp, or almost less than half, we go for a ride, identical weight and identical everything, guess what I get better gas mileage because your regulator is wasting 174 watts of energy that is produced in the form of heat. I have very detailed explanations in the How To Forum, every once in a while I think of another way of explaining things.
So should we replace our regulator if we want to use LED lights? I am really electrically dumb and I'm not getting much from all this searching and reading on the subject.
 

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So should we replace our regulator if we want to use LED lights? I am really electrically dumb and I'm not getting much from all this searching and reading on the subject.
I will do a short explanation. I don't know or don't remember what is in use for the X300 as a regulator-the X300 has almost the same wattage output as the 650 Versys.

So unless otherwise told , I assume the regulator is a shunt regulator.
What happens is similar to a cheap AC generator, if you wanted 60HZ that means the gas motor is running at 3600 RPM, the issue with cheap generators is the regulator is also cheap, so you might see 145 volts AC with just a 100 watt trouble light plugged in, plug in a electric heater at 1800 watts it may drop to 130 VAC, plug a second 1800 watt heater in and you may reach 120 VAC .
So the shunt regulator shorts out or shunts excess voltage- and by doing so it shunts excess power in watts. So consider removing incandescent lights and reducing total power consumption by say 60 to 80 watts- guess what, that shunt regulator just got a additional load that wasn't engineered into it's design.

Now install a series regulator, that 60 to 80 watt reduction is also seen on the stator and regulator.
Any questions just ask.
 
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I will do a short explanation. I don't know or don't remember what is in use for the X300 as a regulator-the X300 has almost the same wattage output as the 650 Versys.

So unless otherwise told , I assume the regulator is a shunt regulator.
What happens is similar to a cheap AC generator, if you wanted 60HZ that means the gas motor is running at 3600 RPM, the issue with cheap generators is the regulator is also cheap, so you might see 145 volts AC with just a 100 watt trouble light plugged in, plug in a electric heater at 1800 watts it may drop to 130 VAC, plug a second 1800 watt heater in and you may reach 120 VAC .
So the shunt regulator shorts out or shunts excess voltage- and by doing so it shunts excess power in watts. So consider removing incandescent lights and reducing total power consumption by say 60 to 80 watts- guess what, that shunt regulator just got a additional load that wasn't engineered into it's design.

Now install a series regulator, that 60 to 80 watt reduction is also seen on the stator and regulator.
Any questions just ask.
Okay, that makes sense. Just to sum it up.

If you want to install LED lights, one should:

a) install electrical accessories that will increase the total consumption of the electrical system close to where it originally was (I assume there is +/-% wiggle room here)

b) install a series regulator/rectifier, which will prevent the electrical system from burning itself out faster. (This sounds like the better option)

I recently replaced my lights with LEDs (minus city lights atm) and was already planning on adding some electrical accessories (driving lights, wireless charger, heated grips), but looking at the service manual, replacing the regulator/rectifier looks like an easy job, especially since I already need to dissemble the front end to wire a few things anyways.


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It also looks like you're recommending a Polaris Regulator/Rectifier, but it looks like it needs to be modified to work on our bikes? I found this link for Roadstercycle.com and they offer 3 Phase Series Regulators that seem to be compatible.
 

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Okay, that makes sense. Just to sum it up.

If you want to install LED lights, one should:

a) install electrical accessories that will increase the total consumption of the electrical system close to where it originally was (I assume there is +/-% wiggle room here)

b) install a series regulator/rectifier, which will prevent the electrical system from burning itself out faster. (This sounds like the better option)

I recently replaced my lights with LEDs (minus city lights atm) and was already planning on adding some electrical accessories (driving lights, wireless charger, heated grips), but looking at the service manual, replacing the regulator/rectifier looks like an easy job, especially since I already need to dissemble the front end to wire a few things anyways.


View attachment 186917

It also looks like you're recommending a Polaris Regulator/Rectifier, but it looks like it needs to be modified to work on our bikes? I found this link for Roadstercycle.com and they offer 3 Phase Series Regulators that seem to be compatible.
I am busy wiring my own bike. Take some photos of your existing regulator. Also some measurements of the regulator and mounting.
I am willing to guide you. Roadster is good but you could do it for half of their price. Your call.

As to electrical load, is the headlights incandescent or led? If incandescent, replacing both lights with led like I did using Safego, it is major reductions in load like I said, dropping a continuos load of 40 to 80 watts which causes a possible regulator overload. As to the stator, the shunt regulator drives the stator at 100% all the time it is capable of producing it.
 
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I am busy wiring my own bike. Take some photos of your existing regulator. Also some measurements of the regulator and mounting.
I am willing to guide you. Roadster is good but you could do it for half of their price. Your call.

As to electrical load, is the headlights incandescent or led? If incandescent, replacing both lights with led like I did using Safego, it is major reductions in load like I said, dropping a continuos load of 40 to 80 watts which causes a possible regulator overload. As to the stator, the shunt regulator drives the stator at 100% all the time it is capable of producing it.
Thanks. I will take some measurements when I pull the front off in the next few weeks. Having this info here would be helpful as a future reference for others.

The stock lights are all incandescent. I upgraded all the lights except for the city lights to LEDs using @Dave 300x 's thread and youtube video. The front end needs to be dissembled to access the city lights, which is the only reason I haven't change those out yet.

Kawasaki Versys 300x light bulb replacements. (LED - vs...

Since I will probably upgrade the regulator/rectifier soon, I won't change back to the stock lights, but as a reference for others, would you recommend changing back to the stock headlight at least, while keeping the other lights LED if they don't plan on upgrading soon? My thinking on this is the headlight draws the most power, while keeping the other lights LED would not affect the system as much. Feel free to correct this thinking if wrong.
 

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The biggest issue is heat dissipation by the regulator when reducing load, the stator output is within 30 watts of the Versys 650.Found my post:
 
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I had to replace the stator at 53,592km [32,678 miles] on my '09 V650, then about 400km later replaced the Kawi shunt R/R w/ a CompuFire series R/R.

Good luck!
 

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I had to replace the stator at 53,592km [32,678 miles] on my '09 V650, then about 400km later replaced the Kawi shunt R/R w/ a CompuFire series R/R.

Good luck!
Wifes 300 will have heat grips, USB aux ports and driving lights. All that should add up. Having said that this bike came with an extended warranty (which Ill probably never use). ;-)
 
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