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On my recent 2000 mile excursion I seemed to have overloaded my rear rack and without some welding and bracing I believe it's toast. I've been looking at the Mastech 1007.005

Has anyone had any experience with them?
THIS is the cause of my KTMDuals rack failure: Too much rearward unsprung weight, causing stress cracks and a bent top plate... :surprise:
You can see the stress cracks in 2 of the pictures and how much sag it had AFTER our little off-road adventure in the Yukon wilderness. The first and last pictures are with sag and the 4th picture is pre cracks without sag.
 

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KTMDuals rear rack has a good strength design. vertical bar (on an angle) like in an I beam.

seems like you carried more than 10kg up top and very rearward.

I dont' think any other rear rack will allow you carry that amount of weight.
Many of the rear racks available use steel tube that will bend just behind the rear mount point.

Is your KTMDuals rear rack steel or Aluminium?

any picks of under the rack? as i dont know how far the supports go.
 

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Modify yours. Make one giant rack that covers the back seat too. Load your heavies on that part, and the lighter stuff in the rear-rear.

I dislike most rear racks and trunks, they're all universally designed to be so far back there. When I'm sure there's many many like me, who will never have a passenger. That's where I want my rack to be. Or at least make it possible to put it in two locations.
 

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The road vibrations can contribute as much or more to the failure when you have point loads (cracked the frame on my GL-1000). I try to put as much load on the passenger seat & only light stuff on my rear rack.
 

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Jeff - in as much as you're a pretty big guy..., were you RIDING it back on the rack...?

:wink2:
 

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I don't think you'll find a stronger design. the rack would be super easy to fix with a minor reinforcement to prevent it from happening again.

its fatigue cracking of the weld itself. combination of factors including: the crack formed in the location of a seam between parts, the grade of weld rod may have been more brittle than the surrounding metal resulting in a stress riser, the weld itself may have failed to have full penetration (possible but less likely)

re-welding with a small gusset added to spread that load out over the seam should fix it permanently.
 
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