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I don't have such issues. however, I would recommend taking the O2 sensor out (you can get for cheap the O2 sensor eliminator). the one from Vulcan S will fit: Oxygen Sensor Eliminator kit

with O2 sensor present, the bike moves too much between open and closed loop, and the transition is not smooth.

also installing booster plug will no doubt help.
the O2 sensor creates a closed loop. Why would the bike move in and out of closed loop? Does the O2 sensor on the bikes in your country have a heater on them?
 

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I agree. i you do not look at the tachometer, you don't even feel that you are high revving. if you add some open silencer, you don't hear the engine so much anymore. i fitted Akra, and even without db killer, it is still very quiet.
 

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the O2 sensor creates a closed loop. Why would the bike move in and out of closed loop? Does the O2 sensor on the bikes in your country have a heater on them?
In normal operation, the ECU only knows the mixture is either too rich or too lean. It doesn't know exactly how much. With a sensor eliminator fitted the system is still in a closed loop. It still receives a lambda value signal. However, the lambda value the ECU now sees is such that the ECU enrichens the mixture to bring it back to what the ECU is programmed to supply. It is like a donkey and a carrot.

O2 sensor heater is not, as far as I know, country-specific, they all have a heater to get the sensor up to temperature quickly after starting.

Above about 1/2 throttle the engine operates such that the sensor value is no longer relevant. It is all to do with emissions at low speed.
 

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In normal operation, the ECU only knows the mixture is either too rich or too lean. It doesn't know exactly how much. With a sensor eliminator fitted the system is still in a closed loop. It still receives a lambda value signal. However, the lambda value the ECU now sees is such that the ECU enrichens the mixture to bring it back to what the ECU is programmed to supply. It is like a donkey and a carrot.

O2 sensor heater is not, as far as I know, country-specific, they all have a heater to get the sensor up to temperature quickly after starting.

Above about 1/2 throttle the engine operates such that the sensor value is no longer relevant. It is all to do with emissions at low speed.
I don't think so. without O2 sensor the bike rides on an open loop alone, as it does not receive any feedback from the lambada sensor. how could the ECU change the mixture if it does not receive any feedback from O2 sensor? it runs only based on its basic map.
 

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Because the widget thing, Oxygen Sensor Eliminator kit, feeds a false signal to the ECU. Otherwise, you would get an error code.
 

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Because the widget thing, Oxygen Sensor Eliminator kit, feeds a false signal to the ECU. Otherwise, you would get an error code.
no, it does not. I don't get any error code. the one from Vulcan S works just fine.
 

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So you believe the widget does nothing? It is only fools the ECU in enriching the mixture? By doing nothing?
Please explain.
Most O2 sensors work the same way irrespective of the manufacturer. Be it Bosch, NGK, Denso et al. The only difference in the motorcycle model is the connector to the harness.
 

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I don't know what the 'widget' you are referring is. I can just say that there is no error code of any sorts. the O2 eliminator enriches the fuel only when the bike is supposed to run in the closed loop, such as keeping steady rpm and in other cases. otherwise, the bike runs according to its map. O2 sensor is bs, installed just to meet the emission regulations. in a car, it is ok, but for a motorbike, it is entirely unnecessary.
 

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I’ve been using the o2 eliminator as well as a boosterplug, this is a reply quotes frm Kawasaki brad himself “ The O2 Eliminator sends approximately a 14.1:1 AFR signal to your bike. The ECU sees that and richens it up a bit but since there is no feed back the adjustment will only be a few points and then it stops trying. So your bike will be running at about 13.6-13.8 AFR with the O2 Eliminator installed. There is a very small improvement in throttle response and overall driveability when the bike is running slightly more rich than from the factory but you are already getting a similar effect from the booster plug.”


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All this is interesting, however I would like to see an actual dyno and AFR chart comparing the setups. No disrespect to anybody, but I want to see the improvement as opposed to being told there is improvement.
And if this info is already out there feel free to show me where.
 

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“The result of eliminating the O2 sensors is that the motorcycle is always in open loop mode. This will result in higher fuel consumption and emissions. But with a good tune, that impact can be minimised, too.
Sum-up

Hopefully this was a clear enough explanation of open loop vs closed-loop modes of fuel injection.
If there’s one thing I want you to take away, it’s this: closed loop is about saving fuel and being environmental, and open loop is about performance and responsiveness.
You can remove closed loop mode if you want. You’ll go a bit faster and smoother, but you won’t be saving the planet — and if you’re in a tightly emissions controlled place, you might be breaking the law and unable to re-register your motorcycle.
But most importantly: stay safe, and stay alive.”

Sourced from Open Loop vs Closed Loop: Understanding Fuel Injection


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the bike already runs too lean, so maybe you are not saving the planet with O2 sensor removed, you are saving the engine :). O2 sensor is meant to saving a bit of fuel, but the bike enters into closed loop mostly when you maintain the same speed; the moment you pull the throttle, it enters the open loop. Ok, I did some tests, such as going for trips with O2 sensor and without it. Frankly speaking, I did not notice any difference in fuel consumption.
 

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Any downside to this combo? Any trouble with the idle or seeing something while riding? Is it all good all around?
I've got the booster plug, but might get rid of the o2 sensor too if it helps.
No issues for this combo. Just smoother rides. Be sure you’re using an o2 eliminator plugged in to cancel that CEL error


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The O2 Eliminator sends approximately a 14.1:1 AFR signal to your bike
So it does do something. I am not privileged to know Kawasaki Brad whomever he is.

The result of eliminating the O2 sensors is that the motorcycle is always in open loop mode.
As the eliminator is sending a signal, the bike is not running open loop. Open-loop implies no signal from the sensor. It is running closed loop with a false signal.

I will bow out of this discussion as everyone appears to be happy knowing what they know.
 

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So it does do something. I am not privileged to know Kawasaki Brad whomever he is.



As the eliminator is sending a signal, the bike is not running open loop. Open-loop implies no signal from the sensor. It is running closed loop with a false signal.

I will bow out of this discussion as everyone appears to be happy knowing what they know.
this is not true. the eliminator plug does send a signal but the ECU interprets it is being in an open loop. so many people eliminated the O2 sensor. what is the point if it does not work as it is designed to work? in my V1000, the ECU is more clever and it detects that the eliminator plug is present due to it sending a constant signal, so I had to fit Dynojet O2 optimiser. but this is not the case with the 300.
 

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What interested me about this discussion was more about saving money. The FI light is illuminated on my Suzuki Van Van. The diagnostic test points to a bad O2 Sensor. I can continue to ride like this indefinitely if I don't mind the light being on because the ECU goes into open loop mode without the input from the sensor. I don't want to spend $200 to replace the sensor so I considered the eliminator in the link in this thread.

Unfortunately, the company makes one for the Van Van 125, but not the Van Van 200. They could be the same, but the company isn't going to say it is.
 

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What interested me about this discussion was more about saving money. The FI light is illuminated on my Suzuki Van Van. The diagnostic test points to a bad O2 Sensor. I can continue to ride like this indefinitely if I don't mind the light being on because the ECU goes into open loop mode without the input from the sensor. I don't want to spend $200 to replace the sensor so I considered the eliminator in the link in this thread.

Unfortunately, the company makes one for the Van Van 125, but not the Van Van 200. They could be the same, but the company isn't going to say it is.
it is probably the same.
 
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