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It was my first time trying to do an oil change, and I was using a cheap torque wrench. I feel pretty wretched about it.I have seen self-tapping drain bolts... has anyone here used one of those? What is there to know about using them? Do I have to replace the whole pan?
 

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It was my first time trying to do an oil change, and I was using a cheap torque wrench. I feel pretty wretched about it.I have seen self-tapping drain bolts... has anyone here used one of those? What is there to know about using them? Do I have to replace the whole pan?
Was just having this exact conversation on another bike forum, I don't understand the need for using a torque wrench on the oil filter or oil drain bolt. I know that they have to list 'something' in the manual but have read many, many accounts of them being stripped. Same with having to destroy a filter to get it removed since they are so over tightened from the factory. I guess the legal team isn't satisfied with printing "use common sense".

I have heard many owners using a heli-coil or time-sert to repair the stripped thread. Good luck with the repair
 

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I ALWAYS use a 'click-type' torque-wrench on the drain plug, but NEVER on a filter.

The instructions painted on the filter is what I use.
 

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Time cert. ++ TIME-SERT Official Threaded inserts for stripped threads, blown out sparkplugs,

Sorry for your troubles. Many years ago I believed tighter was always better. Since then I have learned to look at nuts, bolts and what they are going into and tighten appropriately. I only use a torque wrench in critical areas as I have have heard many sad stories of torque wrench error. I now look at the bolt/nut size and material before swinging on what is effectively an 18" power bar.
 

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Time cert. ++ TIME-SERT Official Threaded inserts for stripped threads, blown out sparkplugs,

Sorry for your troubles. Many years ago I believed tighter was always better. Since then I have learned to look at nuts, bolts and what they are going into and tighten appropriately. I only use a torque wrench in critical areas as I have have heard many sad stories of torque wrench error. I now look at the bolt/nut size and material before swinging on what is effectively an 18" power bar.
If I had thought for a moment and realized I was putting hardened steel into aluminum, I would have thought twice!!

How hard is the TIME-SERT install process? I'm not experienced and I'm afraid of making a bad situation worse.
 

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Was just having this exact conversation on another bike forum, I don't understand the need for using a torque wrench on the oil filter or oil drain bolt.
Oof yeah I definitely won't do it with the torque wrench again. I almost stopped when it was hand tightened and then I thought "no, I better do what my manual said"...

I am going to try and use helicoil. Fingers crossed!
 

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Oof yeah I definitely won't do it with the torque wrench again. I almost stopped when it was hand tightened and then I thought "no, I better do what my manual said"...

I am going to try and use helicoil. Fingers crossed!
Some owners use a torque wrench, some don't, do what you are comfortable with, . I have always screwed the drain bolt in hand tight until snug and then maybe 1/4-1/3 turn with a wrench. YMMV.
 

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Even with a click type torque wrench you have to be careful. With a setting near the low end of the range sometimes the click is hard to hear. You have to feel for the slight break of the wrench head. It is easy to not feel the break and keep pulling on the wrench. Using a 1/2 drive 24" long torque wrench to torque 10- 15 ft/lbs there is little tension on the click cam so it is hard to detect.. That same wrench is able to let you torque to 150 ft/lbs. You will get a loud pop at that setting. If you have little experience I would suggest you to put an extension on the torque wrench and clamp it in a vice and test the torque wrench at several different setting, just to get a feel for it.

I would guess most people will over torque a fastener thinking tighter is better. This might have been true when every thing was made out of steel, now with a lot of things being aluminum you have to be more careful.
 

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If you have little experience I would suggest you to put an extension on the torque wrench and clamp it in a vice and test the torque wrench at several different setting, just to get a feel for it.
I have recommended this to many guys not familiar w/ torque wrenches, PLUS to ALWAYS try to use it SOMEWHERE in its MIDRANGE.

BTW - I have FIVE torque wrenches in my BC shop for various jobs. The 1/4" is REALLY REQUIRED when you do something like adjusting the valves, and just hold it w/ your fingertips!!! (I also have THREE in AZ.)
 

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I learned early on, never too tight. Oil filters when put on dry by the engine manufacturer, can be a bear. Oil plugs, just snug up so the crush washer bites, done. Never used a torque wrench, ever!
 

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The most important thing is to install and tighten fasteners with your hands before putting a tool on them. Cross threading compounds the problem. I have bought used bikes and got bikes back from a recall with cross threaded fasteners.

I use a torque wrench to make sure I don't over tighten a fastener. When I first started using one I was amazed at how quickly it clicked with so little force on my part.

I am wondering if the OP set the torque wrench correctly because most manuals I have read don't use the inch/pounds that are on my wrenches so I have to calculate the conversion.

Now for fasteners that require 80 or above foot-pounds of torque, I use the torque wrench to make sure I have enough torque.
 

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It was my first time trying to do an oil change, and I was using a cheap torque wrench. I feel pretty wretched about it.I have seen self-tapping drain bolts... has anyone here used one of those? What is there to know about using them? Do I have to replace the whole pan?
Not a big deal, you can use over-sized self tapping drain plug, here's a video of some guy doing it to a car, same process, but probably easier on the bike because the access is so much better which will allow you to better control the wrench to make sure the new plug goes in straight when tapping, important

Just make sure you get the right size for the situation and go slow, I'm sure there is be plenty of aluminum left around the original hole.
 

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I have a 3/8ths 0 -105 ft/lb torque wrench and a 1/4" for inch pounds.
I would never use something like a 10 - 150 torque wrench to apply 15ft/lbs.
Mind you, in my early days I stripped my share of nuts and bolts before wising up!
 

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I have a 3/8 (H-F clicker) 10 to 80 '/# and another 3/8 (rotating-dial Snap-On) that's up to 150 "/# - that's a bit UNDER 15'/#.
 
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