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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
No I didn't look in the manual! Ha! Ha! I will look tomorrow. My turn signals are getting tough to push to either side and to clear. :mad: :thumbdown: :censored: Everything needs lube! :teetertooter:
 

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You could try spray electrical contact cleaner (Radio Shack carries it) but I don't believe I'd "lubricate" the switch. Even WD40 might help. I've used that to clean the contacts on my trailer's electrical connectors and it's worked. Neither spray contact cleaner nor WD40 is a lubricant in the traditional sense of the word. Oil is a lubricant, but I sure wouldn't use that.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
WD40 is not in my mind. We used that stuff on the farm and it is about as good as water and not as good as soapy water IMO. And Its gone after one day. I'm thinking maybe petroleum jelly? :thumb: :D On just the moving parts? :thumb: ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Bell Ray the cheap heavy stuff! :thumb: I have some light stuff for my bicycle thats a good thought!
 

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Dielectric Grease makes would be good for this situation. Pull the module apart, clean the bits and when reinstalling, slather everything with dielectric grease. It is waterproof and lubricanty (grease) but also non-conductive.
 

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Goldwings have this problem all the time. It comes up in their FAQs constantly. Use silicone spray. Liberally. WD40 has solvents that might eventually shorten the life of the plastic. Same with contact cleaner if allowed to set too long on the plastic. Ever noticed how switch gear gets white and sun bleeched? You want to avoid chemicals that will accelerate that affect. The silicone spray will have the added benefit of rejuvinating and protecting the plastic as well as cleaning and lubricating it.
 

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try filing your blinker fluid bottle first, might be low :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
try filing your blinker fluid bottle first, might be low :rolleyes:
Thanks, I had no idea about the blinker fluid reservoir because its so small! It was empty! Thanks again! :thumb: :stickpoke:
 

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I know you don't like WD40 but that is what I'd use. Either that or a light oil like 3in1. The last thing you want in that switch is a heavy grease which will hold all of the dirt which contacts it or chain lube which flows on soft then gets super tacky which also holds onto crud. If you open the unit clean any contacts and apply an anti-oxidation liquid such as No-Lox.
Being an electrician, I am electrically sympathetic, so when I wash my bike I cover my switch gear with a small plastic bag.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I know you don't like WD40 but that is what I'd use. Either that or a light oil like 3in1. The last thing you want in that switch is a heavy grease which will hold all of the dirt which contacts it or chain lube which flows on soft then gets super tacky which also holds onto crud. If you open the unit clean any contacts and apply an anti-oxidation liquid such as No-Lox.
Being an electrician, I am electrically sympathetic, so when I wash my bike I cover my switch gear with a small plastic bag.
Thanks for the info! I think you are right about some heavy grease. I used some really light bicycle lub called Finish Line 1-Step cleaner and lubricant. Man did it work awesome! I went on a two hour fun ride last night it was so beautiful out, and my blinkers were smoother than brand new! :thumb: You can tell when you need some lub or its going to start to wear out. Thanks again! :D
 

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Dielectric Grease makes would be good for this situation. Pull the module apart, clean the bits and when reinstalling, slather everything with dielectric grease. It is waterproof and lubricanty (grease) but also non-conductive.
This!
 

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The finish line dry lube is good stuff. Us cyclists know it well, but it's not marketed much to moto folks, although it's very applicable for lubing cables, switches, chain, etc. Non-aerosal products are light and easy to carry in your tool kit too.
 

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Thanks for the info! I think you are right about some heavy grease. I used some really light bicycle lub called Finish Line 1-Step cleaner and lubricant. Man did it work awesome! I went on a two hour fun ride last night it was so beautiful out, and my blinkers were smoother than brand new! :thumb: You can tell when you need some lub or its going to start to wear out. Thanks again! :D
How did you get that Finish Line in there? Take it apart or squirt it in the cracks? I never heard of the stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
How did you get that Finish Line in there? Take it apart or squirt it in the cracks? I never heard of the stuff.
Just squirt it in there! Then use your binkers and give it one more squirt. I didn't want take it all apart. Its great stuff. :thumb:
 

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Thanks, I had no idea about the blinker fluid reservoir because its so small! It was empty! Thanks again! :thumb: :stickpoke:
glad to be of assistance :p
 
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