Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I want to add a few powered accessories to my 09 Versys (heated grips, 12v outlet, maybe fog lights).

I've seen some nice tutorials on adding a terminal strip with an inline fuse and relay. It looks a lot better (and safer) than running each item back to the battery.

Just wondering who else has done something like this with their V, where you located the terminal strip and relay, if you have some pics, etc.

My biggest concern is about having the exposed terminal strip under thd seat. It seems like the potential for a short is high.

Anyone else done this?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,251 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'd looked at the termin8. It looks like it'd work pretty well and could fit nicely in the space under the seat. For $45 I feel like it should include a relay though.

Terminal strips are about $2 and I've got plenty of wire and crimp on connectors laying around. Seems like I should be able to DIY something if I can just figure out where to put it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,772 Posts
Fuzeblock....

And what I did (to both my Vs)....
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
After giving this some thought and looking at what others have done, I actually think I'm going to skip the terminal strip.

What I want right now for accessories is to add a relay to my Oxford heated grips and to add a power outlet.

I think I can actually do that pretty easily without a terminal strip. I'll need to rethink this if I add other accessories, but for what I have/want now, it should work well.

My wiring diagram is attached. I'll post some installation pics soon.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
After giving this some thought and looking at what others have done, I actually think I'm going to skip the terminal strip.

What I want right now for accessories is to add a relay to my Oxford heated grips and to add a power outlet.
I hooked up my Oxford`s to the same wire as the headlight. As long as the headlight is on, the grips stay warm. I figured the headlight fuse was sturdy enough to withstand the draw, especially as I have converted to Xenon, which consumes less power.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,438 Posts
I want to add a few powered accessories to my 09 Versys (heated grips, 12v outlet, maybe fog lights).

I've seen some nice tutorials on adding a terminal strip with an inline fuse and relay. It looks a lot better (and safer) than running each item back to the battery.

Just wondering who else has done something like this with their V, where you located the terminal strip and relay, if you have some pics, etc.

My biggest concern is about having the exposed terminal strip under thd seat. It seems like the potential for a short is high.

Anyone else done this?
Build Your Own Switched and Fused Relay Block - total cost is less than $10 vs $90 cost at Twisted Throttle
Ingredients
- Generic 20 amp automotive relay (~$5) sold at most auto parts stores, (4 or 5 pin)
- Inline 12V fuse holder ($1-2) available at most auto parts and electrical stores
- Terminal Block available at Radio Shack, The Source and most electrical supply places

Tools
- Soldering Iron and damp sponge for cleaning tip, also solder
- Electrical tape or shrink wrap and heat gun
- Volt meter for testing

This provides a switched, high current source. It will only be active with the key is turned on. If you trigger it from the headlight, it will only be on when the head light is on. All automotive relays work the same. You can save a bundle of cash by using an general purpose automotive relay. It will handle more current than you will ever use. Just wire it as follows and use solder, do not just twist wires. Also insulate connections with shrink wrap and a heat gun or electrical tape.

Relay


Terminal Strip with Cover - wire from pin 87 of relay energizes this


Inline Fuse Holder- snip wire in middle and connect one end to + battery terminal and other to pin 30 of relay.


Most Relays are Marked with these Pin Numbers, Four Pin Relays will not have Pin 87a, If not a labelled see pin out diagram below


Pin 30 to POS terminal on battery via inline fuse holder with ~10-20 amp fuse (depending on load), high current
Pin 87 to POS supply terminal on connection strip, high current, all accessories will be powered by this.
Pin 85 to Ground or NEG battery terminal
Pin 86 (trigger wire) to POS wire of head light or other light that is on when the ignition is on. Insignificant power draw
Pin 87a - not used but make sure to insulate this as it is live with the ignition off (reverse of pin 87, not live with pin 87 is) - 4 pin relays will not have a pin 87a

Hints,
- push twisted wire through hole in relay connector and twist then solder, insulate with electrical tape after
- twist wires to be soldered together first, heat the twisted wire from the bottom with the soldering iron long enough to melt the solder, touching the wires, not the soldering iron tip, to melt. Do not melt hot solder onto cold wires.
- Make sure your soldering iron tip is clean and shiny. Clean with damp sponge or really dirty tip with emery paper.
- Wrap any surfaces that can short with electrical tape including your terminal block after you have done all connections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
That's exactly the kind of thing I was thinking of making. But i couldn't figure out where I wanted to put the terminal strip and I don't like the idea of the exposed terminals.
Once it is all wired up get some liquid electrical tape and slob it on there.

Done and done.

:yeahsmile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Ok, so here's some photos of my solution (no terminal strip despite the original thread title).

Here's the power socket. I wanted it centrally located. Most of the time I'm using it for my phone which is in my pocket or the saddle bag. From here I can easily reach my tank bag, coat pocket or saddle bag.


Here's the relay all wired up. You can see my wiring diagram in a previous post. The diagram doesn't show this clearly, but I just mated everything up right at the relay. For example, there's three ground wires all coming together at one pin on the relay. I used a blade style crimp terminal that was big enough to hold it all together. I'll probably regret not soldering those together, but the crimps seemed pretty stable.


Here I found the perfect place to tuck away the relay.


And here's the posi-tap to trigger the relay. I like the posi-tap a lot. It taps the wire without cutting it. So it doesn't weaken the wire and you can remove and repair it easily. Here I tapped into the line that feeds the license plate light as others recommended. This is great because it's not essential for bike function or safety, so if anything goes wrong, nothing critical is affected.


You can't see it in any of these photos, but there's an inline fuse feeding all this off the battery.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
+1 I did something very similar, except my relay and wiring is inside the fairing, under the tachometer area. I have not found electrical tape to work well for very long. I have had much better luck with heat shrink tubing. It is much more durable than tape.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top