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Opening a can of worms here, but after re a $h/+ ton of posts on this topic and knowing full well I have an issue with my stator and/or rr (likely both) I want to know what folks would purchase for each if money was no object. It appears there is combinations that will screw up various parts of the charging system if you only replace one item, so I’m going to replace all three components - stator, R/R and likely the battery - to hope it will fix this charging issue. I’ve purchased two batteries in the last few years and will like.y need to yet gain and hope NOT to have to continue to do that by fixing the charging issue once and for all.

Full disclosure, I am leaning towards a series R/R, but beyond that I cant say. Preferably I’d like as close to possible a PNP system as I’m finishing up a complete rebuild of my Jeep and really am tired of complexity. But if that isn’t possible, then I’ll do what I have to do. Not breaking down in the middle of know were is the min thing.

so, discuss amongst yourselves!

thanks for any all ideas.

Tim
 

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650 Versys 330 watts maximum
I have lots of posts / threads on this, since my specialty is electrical, I have a huge advantage . One thing you failed to add is the model year. MK-1 and Mk-2 have limitations as to the regulator size. The MK-3 The stator is a choice between OEM, used or Stators.
Since this forum has many of my threads, I see no advantage rehashing it here. As to plug and play, I came up with a solution, however the header plug is meant for printed circuit boards, it cannot take the heat required to connect to a wire harness, so until something else comes along, that is the end of that. ( I can solder them but I need to use freeze on every connection, just not worth it)
Also the V1000 and Ninja 1000 appear to have a series regulator,, real simple I have a test for this, and was interested because Kawasaki is using regulators similar to the Polaris. So far no V1000 Versys has come forward. Regulator / Series / Shunt/ Test Proof / Legit or Fake?
 
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2016 Versys 1000 CBF1000 VFR800
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I'd add that if the stator tests good, no need to replace it. You could pull the cover and see how it looks also..
The RR and good connections are more of a factor IMHO. Me, I'd just get a series RR, ensure the connections to the stator are soldered or crimp type plus solder. Common issue on older Hondas, mofsets helped greatly but series trumps that. Roadster Cycle if going new, especially his harness.
Battery......... of course you have to have a good one. Perhaps get your existing one load tested, but if it's getting up there in age and you don't keep it on a Battery Tender...... nuff said. Charging voltage of course has to be good first.
I'd go OEM stator if replacing it.
 

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I'd add that if the stator tests good, no need to replace it. You could pull the cover and see how it looks also..
The RR and good connections are more of a factor IMHO. Me, I'd just get a series RR, ensure the connections to the stator are soldered or crimp type plus solder. Common issue on older Hondas, mofsets helped greatly but series trumps that. Roadster Cycle if going new, especially his harness.
Battery......... of course you have to have a good one. Perhaps get your existing one load tested, but if it's getting up there in age and you don't keep it on a Battery Tender...... nuff said. Charging voltage of course has to be good first.
I'd go OEM stator if replacing it.
To be honest, OEM and electrosport are identical, only $$ difference . Kawasaki doesn't manufacture stators, they buy them from vendors. Electrosport is a vendor ( no idea if they supply Kawasaki )
As to testing, I have a thread on using the start motor on the Versys for load testing of the battery, extremely accurate , all you need a a meter .
 

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Electrosport claim higher outputs, and you know that means there are more windings with thinner wire..... hope their failure rate is a lot lower these days..... if you're gonna use one, then get the series regulator.....
 

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Electrosport claim higher outputs, and you know that means there are more windings with thinner wire..... hope their failure rate is a lot lower these days..... if you're gonna use one, then get the series regulator.....
My understanding is it is 18 gauge magnet wire and Delta wound. Unless you have solid infirmation, your post is misinformed by several aspects. First , output is limited by the laminations, magnetic field strength and size of copper wire / impedance of winding. I looked at converting to Y connected, using 15 gauge , Y connected uses less turns, I also looked at dropping 2 turns every second pole, which would give lower voltage and higher current.
China stators use 18 gauge Y connected, instead of the correct 15 gauge.
I have been involved with several electrosport replacement stators. The last one was for my buddy with a Old 750 Honda shaft drive last fall.
In all cases, if it was 3 phase and stated Delta wound , when it arrived, it was exactly as in the description. I also dealt with RM Stator out of Quebec. The last time was helping @Smiley. That stator was less lamination's ( thinner ) and 66% copper as it was Y connected and used 18 gauge magnet wire . I did a post on that and said using a Polaris regulator and China stator no worries. I now recommend to steer clear of RM Stator , FYI the stator will output 330 watts but the current is over 18 gauge magnet wire per line out as compared to electrosport and OEM using two 18 gauge magnet wires per line out
 

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Testing a stator will not give you any idea of how long it will last, you have to see it... If it is looking toasty then it's a good idea to replace it. Thing is, the insulation burns/degrades gradually, it might test OK in your garage in the morning when its just about to fail and leave you stranded just a couple hours later that very same day.
 

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Testing a stator will not give you any idea of how long it will last, you have to see it... If it is looking toasty then it's a good idea to replace it. Thing is, the insulation burns/degrades gradually, it might test OK in your garage in the morning when its just about to fail and leave you stranded just a couple hours later that very same day.
Testing a stator will not give you any idea of how long it will last, you have to see it... If it is looking toasty then it's a good idea to replace it. Thing is, the insulation burns/degrades gradually, it might test OK in your garage in the morning when its just about to fail and leave you stranded just a couple hours later that very same day.
I would disagree with you, in fact, a visual check with shorted turns may show nothing. Using my 2000. Fixed RPM and open circuit VAC test will pick up as low as 2 shorted turns. Only other way is with a LCR Meter on the bench test.
Also the shunt regulator is a huge contributor to stator failure.
 

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Hey, I'll agree with you stay clear of RM (and Rick's)...... let's just say I know a few elected to use Electrosport, and they failed, they all said never again (this was a few years ago when they boasted 20% more output). If things have changed for the better at Electrosport, you would know better than I the current quality, especially if they are sticking close to OEM outputs.. I'm not an electrical engineer or expert in that field (pun intended).
Otherwise, I see nothing wrong with an OEM.
Also agree with you on the shunt regulators, ditch 'em if you got 'em.
I have a VFR and read all the horrors of the bad connections, melted connectors and fried stators with shunt regs. Roadster Cycle must do a good business with them, lol. However, I have seen some awful looking stators that still function provided you put a good reg on it. They look cooked well but they aren't cooked (yet). Of course, anything can fail at any time regardless of its appearance.....
Anyway, appreciate the insights.

As a matter of preference, I've put a cheapie voltmeter on every bike, wired live direct to battery and an inline switch so I can shut if off to prevent parasitic draw when the bike sits. I watch voltages at various loads, particularly when I'm running heated gear. My current battery is 5 years old, and I've only owned this thing a week. Can't get a resting voltage above 12.4....... it's "OK" but it isn't gonna cut it the fall season given the stator output.... OTOH, the FJR has a 590W... bit more headroom.
 

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Well, I've yet to have a shorted stator that is not burnt. Meh, its not worth overthinking it, just keep a spare stator. If you're leaving on a long trip you can take in your luggage, it's very easy to replace... I'll just keep doing what has worked for me, replace it after a while as preemptive maintenance, couple missed hotel reservations and/or towtruck are more expensive than a stator.
 

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Well, I've yet to have a shorted stator that is not burnt. Meh, its not worth overthinking it, just keep a spare stator. If you're leaving on a long trip you can take in your luggage, it's very easy to replace... I'll just keep doing what has worked for me, replace it after a while as preemptive maintenance, couple missed hotel reservations and/or towtruck are more expensive than a stator.
I originally worked in a electric motor shop some 50 years ago, I have seen 3 kind's of failures and at one time we had over 20 pages with photos of those, unfortunately between the new ownership of the forum and photobuckets, we lost them. The early MK-1 and some MK-2 had the 3 phase delta winding jumper connections on the same side as the 3 phase line output, so phase to tuurn short was common at the 3 phase connection. The second was single phase where every third pole looked new and the other two were burnt, caused by the connector at the stator.

The third was a turn to turn short, possibly caused by expansion and contraction, it is this last one that many times when the stator starts to fail, it isn't obvious even looking at it, which is where my test comes in. I separated this last condition because many do not understand the difference between a shunt and series regulator, nor do they know the coating on the magnet wire is subject to abrasion due to rapid expansion and contraction, which is why all stators are given a ( present day is epoxy coating. Some stators have been encapsulated ( only done if abrasion is a concern, generally a bad idea as heat transfer is poor)..
So a short explanation, all my Versys have seen a series regulator ( 2007 & 2015) I am now running a Polaris 4016868 rated at 50 amp, similar to what Roadster cycle has. My base load plus Denali lights is around 180 to 200 watts . I will use that for comparison, at roughly 2500 RPM the stator outputs close to 90% output at 3000 RPM it is at maximum of 330 watts.
So here is the comparison;
RPM Stator output Series Stator output Shunt

1350 140-160 watts 140 -160W " "
1500 160-180 W 160-180 W
2500 200 W ( as required) 270 -280W
3000-3500 200 W ( as required) 300-330W

So with a shunt regulator, every time you return to idle the stator starts to cool down, the steel laminations take longer to contract as compared to copper, the same goes for expansion, the copper reacts much faster. So which stator do you think will fail first, the series regulator that runs roughly 95% of the time at a continuous 70% load or the shunt stator that is heating and cooling constantly, and at times running at 100% output? I have extremely long threads on this with lots of technical info. My 4016868 cost $120 Canadian and I found a local motorcycle dealer with one in stock at $110 last September. My average ride is around 430 KM , I did several in 2019 that were 960KM ( a very long day getting home at 1AM), I don't carry a spare stator, I have the Yuasa battery and series regulator and Voltmeter / Neat Little/ Digital / Bar Graph / Others
183328
 

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Went through the logic with my CBF1000 and the VFR..... no way I'm carrying a spare stator, jeez. The better fix is a good R/R system and reviewing the connections once in a while to prevent all that nonsense IMHO. I'm a little more anal, I like digital readouts to the tenth on my voltmeters, lol.
 

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I wear trifocals, I spent my whole career looking at meters and scopes. That link for the neat little voltmeter tells you that each led on is equal to a certain charging voltage , once the 3 green are out, it is very close to discharging the battery . I associate green as good.
So unless asked this is my last post in this thread. I think I have veered off course here. Your second sentence is 100% bang on!
 

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Only time a stator failed and left me stranded was after 70,000kms, thats the only time that happened with my prior two Versys. I really don't think that is "too problematic" to be concerned about, it's not like some bikes, cogh Honda, that you're lucky to get 10,000kms out of a stator and RR or like the new BMW waterheads that the shole bike has to come apart to replace it. Carrying a spare stator doesn't make sense to me as well, that's why instead of trying to get another stator to last 70,000 kms I just replaced it at 60,000. The new stator was cheaper than the paid for hotel rooms that I could not cancel when the 70,000km stator failed.
 
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