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The Ninja has a conventional fork, the Versys an USD fork, therefor no need of a brace. But maybe I'm missing something in what you are asking ...
 

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He wants to reduce the steering head shake tendency at 100+ mph, especially under hard acceleration... Larger windscreens make it much worse. Leaning it back by modifying the windscreen mounts like I did improves things substantially, beside greatly reducing buffeting.
 

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He wants to reduce the steering head shake tendency at 100+ mph, especially under hard acceleration... Larger windscreens make it much worse. Leaning it back by modifying the windscreen mounts like I did improves things substantially, beside greatly reducing buffeting.
Will a steering damper solve that shake?
 

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Will a steering damper solve that shake?
Yes! :thumb:



That DMV is a very nice low-mount Versys specific steering damper kit... Their ER6 version is very similar in design to Hyperpro and Bitubo.

http://apshop-racing.com/product_desc.php?pid=21

Bitubo:


ER6/Ninja 650R top-mount kits are available with model specific brackets, some require welding.

http://www.scottsperformance.com/Stabilizer_Purchase2.php?Make=Kawasaki&Model=EX&Bike_ID=3900&Year=2008&Size=650&Fred=R Ninja&BI_ID=21933
http://www.scottsperformance.com/litrack/202.pdf
http://www.hyperprousa.com/catalog.php?cat=Dampers&make=Kawasaki&model=367&model_name=367&model_realname=ER-6 N/F 09> (top mount)
http://www.bitubo.com/
http://www.titax.com/products/steering-damper/steering-damper

Here's an Öhlins mounted on stock coolant reservoir bolt:

 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I've never had a bike with inverted forks, so maybe it's just me. If I push it kinda hard in the corners it just feels kinda squirrelly. I weigh 225, so maybe stifffer springs? I still have the stock front tire (Sportmax.) I cranked the pre-load all the way already, damping also. Still have a lot of dive under braking. Please don't suggest a diet
 

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I run at maximum preload too, but with 12.5W (half and half of 10W and 15W) fork oil for sufficient damping and motion control... Actually, I sealed my fork caps back on with my forks cooled to 22F, to have about 5 psi in 72F ambient, so I now run about 4 turns out on preload with the same resulting support.
 

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Fullcircle, I bet you'll find a good set of tires will make a world of difference with cornering. You'll still be left with dive when braking. It's the price you pay for fairly long travel suspension. You could stiffen the fork up with heavier oil, a revalve or stiffer springs but (for me at least) that would make the ride too harsh. I really would start with the tires though, before changing anything else, as that might be the simplest solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks everyone for the replies. Not thinking about a fork brace anymore (got the same response on that at work.) Fork oil is easiest and cheaper than tire- I'll try that first. I seriously doubt my V will ever see the 100 MPH head shake (with me riding it) anyway:) I am blessed with living smack dab in the rural Lake county Florida area where tight, curvy, hilly roads are the norm.
 

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Thanks everyone for the replies. Not thinking about a fork brace anymore (got the same response on that at work.) Fork oil is easiest and cheaper than tire- I'll try that first. I seriously doubt my V will ever see the 100 MPH head shake (with me riding it) anyway:) I am blessed with living smack dab in the rural Lake county Florida area where tight, curvy, hilly roads are the norm.
Hills in Florida? Curvy roads? The only curvy things I remember in Flordia were in south beach, wearing bikinis :D
 

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I grew up in Jacksonville and rode bikes there for years and the worse "Hill" I ever climbed was there. Ran into a nasty Northeaster riding back from close to Daytona on A1A. Took almost 9 hours to do less than 80 miles into the teeth of a 40+ MPH. I lived in VA right on the Blue Ridge Parkway and that trip still stood out even climbing up a mountain. On the BRP you can always look forward to the other side of the mountain and the free ride down.

BTW Changing the tires (if they are the factory Dunflops they are just plain scary) gets my vote along with cranking up the pre-load and dampening on BOTH ends of the bike.
 

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This is http://ridetherockies.com/route Colorado's lagest non competitive bicycle ride event.

This is stage 3 (of 7) http://www.usaprocyclingchallenge.com/stages/2012/stage-3 of CO largest competitive event.

I did experience a wobly front end at high speed (100+ MPH) with the OEM tires (Dunlop D221). They are not the best out there but not bad enough to change them before they are worn out. I tried the Dunlop RoadSmarts (II I believe) and they were marginally better. I'm riding on Pirelli Scorpion Trail much better road tire and usable in dirt.

And I slowed down quite a bit in the last year :grinangel:
 

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Do'nt know what year you have,( mine's an 09 SMURF edition) and at 225#s you got ~90#s on me. Now for my take on suspenion tuning for the Versys, which is truly ONLY applicable to my weight and riding style? At my weight I actually use ZERO front preload in concert to the RH base compression valve removed of three of the seat shims (largest closest to the actual valve) I've recently installed the internals of the RH side into the LH leg. NOTE without the base valve. But configured the cartridge piston to add a slight amount of additional rebound and some adjustablity for SLOW speed compression damping also. Just finished a 670 mile/ 26 hr trip to dial this new to me combination., And I'm pleased with the results. As delivered the LH is there for rigidity, spring, and air volume support only! For me high speed compression damping front & rear is too harsh. I have a background as a Pro wrench. My shock is the stock body and rod with a vastly modified rebound and compression stack, Remote resavoir and hydraulic remote spring adjustment. I've reduced rear spring rate ~ 30%( again note just for me) Feeling happy now as I'm using most of the available travel without harsh bottoming and with ADJUSTABLE damping control. Layman terms, more compliant and more secure (feeling) if adjusted properly. I have rear capable of cadillac or pack (roadrace terms) Front is a work still in progress?? P. S. Best thing that can be done IMO to the stock forks is to Raise the oil level 10mm regardless of other mods. Yes I'm using this method even now with the mods above. Caution !!! Measure this carefully or it is possible to hydraulic lock the forks and blow oil past the seal ?
 

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Please don't suggest a diet
Oh... :interesting:


Fullcircle, I bet you'll find a good set of tires will make a world of difference with cornering. You'll still be left with dive when braking. It's the price you pay for fairly long travel suspension. You could stiffen the fork up with heavier oil, a revalve or stiffer springs but (for me at least) that would make the ride too harsh. I really would start with the tires though, before changing anything else, as that might be the simplest solution.
I have a michelin pr2 up front. Not fast but at 60+ mph leaning on a freeway exit turn (those that turn almost 360 degrees) i find it to be chattering as if it is losing traction and about to give way and lowside. That is scary.

Was considering a damper but most of my supersport friend said it was not needed on the v. I'll get the front changed to pirelli angel st once this pr2 used up and see how it works out
 

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I agree with your friends, I think a steering damper is unnecessary on our bike. While the steering is fairly quick the bike is not powerful enough to cause the front end to float under acceleration. I know, you can wheelie in the first two gears, but after that the drama settles down.

Nothing sticks as well, and makes you feel so much like Rossi (confidence), as a new tire. Maybe your pr2 is close to the end of its life? Besides the stockers, I've had 4 different tires on the front: Avon Storm, Scorp Trail, PR3 and MT60. When they were new they all felt unbeatable. Some adaptation is required as the tires begin to wear out, IMO.
 
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