Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,427 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Looking for opinions..................

I recently used method #1 to adjust my chain slack to 3.5 cm however I've been getting different options on what is the correct way. Googling various articles on the Internet there seems to be a few different opinions on what is the correct way. Even the Kawasaki service manual is slightly ambiguous on this question. It only provides a diagram that alludes to either method 1 or 2. You will get a larger measurement if you measure the distance between pulling the chain downward all the way and then pulling the chain upward compared with measuring the distance from the "at rest" position of the chain to pulling it all the way up. So which is correct?

Note we can assume a measurement is taken from the center point of the chain run where the chain is slackest and using the same edge of the chain to perform both measurements (top edge of chain on bottom run) as this is specified in the manual.

1) Do you measure chain slack from pulling the chain all the way down to pulling the chain all the way up? Yields biggest number.

2) Do you measure from the at rest position of the chain to pulling the chain all the way up?

3) Do you measure from the at rest position of the chain to pulling the chain all the way down? Yields a smaller number than #2.

4) Do you measure as in #1 but divide by 2? A few articles mention this method. Yields the smallest number.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
My chain never touches the swing arm at all. I have adjusted it too tight, to the point that it made a humming sound, at around 55mph and above. That being said, I adjusted my chain to have about 1 1/4" slack, with the chain tight on either top or bottom.


Sent from my iPhone using MO Free
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,251 Posts
I just adjusted mine after a rear tire change last Tuesday. I referenced the maintenance manual and set my chain to 1 to 1 1/4 inch using your method #1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,983 Posts
#1. Check chain tension at its tightest position. Find tightest position by rotating rear wheel. Measure and adjust chain tension with rear suspension fully extended.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,018 Posts
I kick it with my toe, if it doesn't hit the swingarm its good. Harhar
That's what I do, but instead of being happy it doesn't touch the swingarm, I look for about 1/2 to 3/4" FROM the swingarm.

Then every now-and-then I'll take out a ruler and properly check the slack.

BTW - where the manual says to "kick the tire forward" when loosening a too-tight chain, I take a phillips screwdriver, put it into a rear-sprocket tooth at "6 o'clock", then GENTLY turn the rear wheel CCW till the axle's pulled forward, then tighten things up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Looking for opinions..................

I recently used method #1 to adjust my chain slack to 3.5 cm however I've been getting different options on what is the correct way. Googling various articles on the Internet there seems to be a few different opinions on what is the correct way. Even the Kawasaki service manual is slightly ambiguous on this question. It only provides a diagram that alludes to either method 1 or 2. You will get a larger measurement if you measure the distance between pulling the chain downward all the way and then pulling the chain upward compared with measuring the distance from the "at rest" position of the chain to pulling it all the way up. So which is correct?

Note we can assume a measurement is taken from the center point of the chain run where the chain is slackest and using the same edge of the chain to perform both measurements (top edge of chain on bottom run) as this is specified in the manual.

1) Do you measure chain slack from pulling the chain all the way down to pulling the chain all the way up? Yields biggest number.

2) Do you measure from the at rest position of the chain to pulling the chain all the way up?

3) Do you measure from the at rest position of the chain to pulling the chain all the way down? Yields a smaller number than #2.

4) Do you measure as in #1 but divide by 2? A few articles mention this method. Yields the smallest number.
Since no one answered you really....

Option #2 - Measure it from the rest position of the cahin to pulling the chain all the way up.

Video Below which is good.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
The way to get an accurate measurement is to have the bike on the ground and then sit on the bike and have someone to measure the slack. Or you could leave it a little loose from spec, when weight is put on the bike the chain will tighten up to spec.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,983 Posts
Rear suspension should be unladen and as fully extended as possible for accurate chain tension measurements under consistent conditions... Adjusting chain tension within specs with rear suspension compressed will result in excessive slack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
I go for the larger side of the spec. I had it too tight once and almost trashed the chain.

Too loose is better than too tight. I go for 1.4" or the 35mm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,427 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Since no one answered you really....

Option #2 - Measure it from the rest position of the cahin to pulling the chain all the way up.

Video Below which is good.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zB4DsHV8SAQ
He uses option #1 in the video. Notice he first pulls down the chain to take all the slack out of it. I am convinced at this point option #1 is the correct way as I have found supporting articles from cycle magazines and even this video that support this.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,018 Posts
The way to get an accurate measurement is to have the bike on the ground and then sit on the bike and have someone to measure the slack. Or you could leave it a little loose from spec, when weight is put on the bike the chain will tighten up to spec.
Respectfully... the ONLY way that chain-slack will be affected by someone sitting on the bike, is IF your frame had all the strength, and stiffness of spaghetti.

IF you want to know EXACTLY what the slack should be, determine a method to get the center-lines of the front sprocket, rear sprocket and swing-arm pivot DIRECTLY IN LINE, as this is the point at which the chain will be at its TIGHTEST. (Can be done by supporting the bike, removing the rear shock, then lifting the rear till all three line up.) THEN adjust the chain till it has just a LITTLE slack; put the shock back into it; put the bike back onto its wheels and MEASURE how much slack there is.

Or, just read your manual for the numbers that Ma Kawasaki came up with when THEY did it at the factory.
:topsecret:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,654 Posts
What you'er doing by sitting on the bike is trying to get the swing are to swing through it's ark of travel so as to have the longed extention you can get. Some dirt bikes can see a 2" change of tension on the chain in a full travel.I can't see a Versys having more than an inch if that.

I don't get out a Mic of caliper I just eye ball it to have about 1" of slack.with the bikes of the kickstand and go with that. Yea it's probibly loose BUT that's much better that tight, too tight wears chain sest out and counter shaft bearing and counter shafts as well. As long as the chain's not slaping the swing arm or trying to "skip" teeth on the sprocket I'm happy. I got close to 20,000 miles on my KLR and would have gotten more BUT a big rock in WV bent the rear sprocket so badly I had to beat it with another rock to keep the chain on long enough to make a shop and replace both the sprockets and chain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
642 Posts
Or, just read your manual for the numbers that Ma Kawasaki came up with when THEY did it at the factory.
:topsecret:
And yet doing this simple thing is difficult for so many. Think break-in, oil change interval, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
The top should be ~one finger above the swing arm, when on the side stand.

Too much tension is much more common and hurtful than too little.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top