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Discussion Starter #1
My Versys is very new still and I am enjoying it immensely. I do plan to take a coast to coast trip with it in a few months. I am getting things together as a real newbie. I haven't owned very many bikes lately with chains, and without a center stand, I am wondering how others go about lubing the chain while away from home.

I grew up on British bikes that leaked oil (of course) and lube on the chain was constant, and slung off on my nice chrome rims. So I am not interested in any automatic oiling systems.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Richard
 

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A small can of WD-40? Spray the chain where you can reach it, roll the bike forward, spray some more? Find some friends from the forum or otherwise who have the space and tools to loan you? Maybe find a shop on the way who can do it for you?

If you're in San Francisco, let me know, you can swing on by.
 

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Easiest way is Scottoiler. This is the first bike I have owned with Scottoiler. I would lube my chain once a day by rolling the bike around in a circle in a parking lot lubing about 10 links at a time. You can also use a prop, bike jack. You pull the bike up on the side stand and use the prop under the opposite side to get the back wheel off the ground. The prop is also useful for tire changing.
 

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Prop Stand, a forum search should show how it's done. There have been MANY here, myself included, who have done it in DIY fashion.
 

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Install a Scotch Oiler and your are free to ride any distance as long as there is lube in the main tube..............:goodluck:eek:n your trip.
 

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Good question. I get a small can of WD40 and my favorite lube, and a bunch of old rags. I just clean what I can reach, roll the bike forward, and repeat until I've cleaned and lubed the entire chain.

There are some products that claim to lift the rear wheel to make it easier that could be packed for travel:

A motorcycle rear wheel cleaning stand-
http://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-wheel-cleaning-stand-98800.html

Or a Tommyjack-
http://www.webbikeworld.com/r3/tommy-jack/
Also mentioned in this link is a Rollastand, they say it requires muscle to work.

I've not tried either of these "lifts/stands". I personally wouldn't bother taking up the extra packing space with them, but the Tommyjack makes me think about it....

Note: I don't know how old the webbike world article is, so I don't know if the link to the site that sells the Tommyjack works. I just found the article by searching.
 

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I have a pak-jak stuck in one of my bags.
It is small, light, and handy.
It's right next to my Stop&Go tire repair kit
 

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This thread has several DIY and commercial solutions, including the Pak-Jak.

http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/showthread.php?t=15766

I bring my home-make jack and a can of Bell-Ray strapped side by side. Put the velcro straps on the front brake, side stand on firm ground, jack goes under the right rear spool. Once I have the wheel a couple mm off the ground I can lube the chain with ease.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes! Thanks for all the good links and ideas. I will probably be traveling alone and hope to be gone for a month or so, so I do think maintenance will be involved at least a little.

I will retire in a few more days and this trip is like a reward to myself (besides the new bike). I have been riding off and on for over 50 years, and have recently been on the sportbike side of things. The Versys is a change of direction and I am thankful for all on this site for support.

Richard
 

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I've done the "10 link at a time then roll the bike" method before. I found it to be quite time consuming and still messy. Here is what I do now when away from my track stand. I stop at anyplace that has a dumpster bin accessible and room to roll my V around. 90%of the time you can find a suitable cardboard box poking out the top or within reach. I make a disposable shield by just ripping open the box and tearing it into a piece about 20inches long and about 6" wide. Leave the box ears on the "custom spray shield" and shove it (folded) between the chain and the swingarm. It will stay in place on its own as the clearance isn't great right there. Now you can spray about a third of the links at once and keep your bike clean too. Remove the cardboard, roll forward to do the next third, repeat until done. Now throw all that cardboard back into the dumpster bin and your done. If your the type that wipes the chain after oiling, then wipe before moving the bike between chain sprays. Throw that oily rag or newspaper away too.

Tips: if you have room to carry it, make two cardboard shields. Save the second one in your bags for next time. If your traveling with others, work as a team on each others bikes and it goes rather quickly. One rolls, one sprays. My friend rides a Triumph 650 and we have it down where we have both chains lubed in minutes when we ride together.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Gustavo,
I have never seen anything like this before and I really like the idea of it, but it just seams far to expensive to be practical. Maybe someday it will be cheaper and more readily availble.

Richard

BTW, I ordered the packjack.
 

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Gustavo,
I have never seen anything like this before and I really like the idea of it, but it just seams far to expensive to be practical. Maybe someday it will be cheaper and more readily availble.

Richard

BTW, I ordered the packjack.

Did you order the Pacjack model for the Versys its for taller bikes. You have to call them to order that one.
 

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Find an old crutch, and cut it down (see the pics), and get a piece of double-sided velcro about 8" long (used to hold the front brake ON so your V doesn't roll). Bike on sidestand, then lift up from right side w/ your shoulder, then place the crutch under your swingarm spool... you DO have 'spools', right...? Then spray, turn wheel a bit, repeat till done.

TOTAL cost? A couple of $....
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Weljo2001,
I simply placed my order on their website, but followed up with an email after reading about the adjustable one. Greg, from packjack, responded that he would have asked about the particulars of the bike. I did order for spools, as I do have them for when I am home, and Greg said that the adjustable would work fine for the Versys with spools.

I will do a photo follow-up when I get it. This really seems to be the answer for me.

Also, I do like the idea of using something to hold the front brake on while doing this!

Thanks to all,
Richard
 

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I haven't tried the product yet, but the idea of Motul's Chain Paste sounds like it'd be a good thing for travel. Comes in a toothpaste like tube, has a brush built in to it and you kind of scrub it into the chain to apply the lubricant.

Would pack easy, no aerosol cans to worry bout leaking.

I'd recommend wrapping a bit of velcro around your Pack-Jack so you have something to wrap around your grip and front brake lever. Don't want the bike rolling off the stand while your fingers are between the chain and sprocket!
 

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I keep a short tarp bungee strap with my jack.
You have to have something to apply the front brake anyway.
I would have thought something like that would come in the package
 
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