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How gentle are you using manual transmission?

6619 Views 16 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  Itsgordo
After watching this car care video it reminds me not to stay in 2nd gear for a long period of time while cruising around the neighborhood. Riding a car in manual transmission is almost the same as we do in motorcycles.

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Some kids riding crotch rockets think it's cool to maintain revs at 6,000+... I'm always below 3,000 rpm in town, up to 5th gear at 40 mph.
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Well in my Ford Focus MK2 (gasoline engine) I change the gear to about 2500 rpm, if I need to accelerate faster then I will change gears at higher rpm 3000-3500.
When I come to an intersection, I slow down by downshifting and using the brake. I use first gear only when I need to start and I have stopped completely.
When I wait at the traffic lights for the light to turn green, the transmission is in neutral. I mostly drive as I was taught in driving school and as my dad taught me.

The car has 240,000 km, original clutch and that's it, normal driving without going crazy, regular maintenance and regular replacement of parts and no problems with them.
I always leave the bike in 1st gear at a traffic light. We were taught that for safety reasons- you don't want to be in neutral if a car fails to stop behind you. Also, slipping the clutch is necessary for slow-speed maneuvers. Doesn't seem to harm my clutch.

Comparing a car with a single friction plate is not the same as a multi-friction plate clutch on a motorcycle. However, I do see how his points and ideas apply to automobiles.
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Honestly I don鈥檛 even pay attention to the RPMS. For me it鈥檚 all about feel and what I need bike to do. This includes city riding, highway and canyons. Generally I don鈥檛 beat crap out of it but everyone now and then I will have a bit more fun. Same applies for me with cars
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Heh. On my V650 I slip the clutch when getting started or when maneuvering at low speed. Multi-plate wet clutches were designed for this. I also shift without the clutch when accelerating hard, so鈥 One of these days I plan on buying the parts to install a slipper clutch so aggressive downshifting isn鈥檛 as concerning.

With my GTI, which has a lightened flywheel and performance pressure plate, I have to rev the engine and slip the clutch to start moving or the engine will stall. Once moving, the clutch is used as a momentary switch.
A video on an automotive clutch doesn't have a ton to do with a motorcycle clutch. Different things constitute abuse, just for starters.

As for motorcycles:

If there's an error to be made re: engine speed, I'll make it with more rpm rather than fewer. Lugging does nobody any favors. No, I'm not going to be running around in town at 7k just because it exists, but I won't hesitate to make excursions there. FWIW, I did a BunBurner Gold a few years back, and my FZ6 spent most of 24 hours at 7,000rpm - exactly half of redline.

The reasons I might be imperfect with the clutch come down to circumstances. You know what they are. But I'll add that most bikes I've owned have been very forgiving. I've had a couple of bikes where I just tapped the lever on downshifts, just enough to break the plates apart. Other bikes wanted full disengagement every time. And speaking of forgiving, my Versys spent its entire experience with the original owner running M1 CAR OIL, and somehow the clutch works fine. Don't ask me, because I have no idea.
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...And speaking of forgiving, my Versys spent its entire experience with the original owner running M1 CAR OIL, and somehow the clutch works fine. Don't ask me, because I have no idea....
I have or have had THREE V650s - all brand new. An '08, '09 and a '15. I have run Mobil1 15w-50 CAR OIL in all three from the first oil change (or from 1,000 miles). The '08 HAS 101,554 MILES; the '09 was a write-off in summer '15 at 62,790kms (39,016 miles), replaced by the '15 which has 91,120kms (56,619 MILES) as of right now.

NONE have had any engine or clutch issues. Take from that 'what you will'!

(y)(y)

:cool:
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I have or have had THREE V650s - all brand new. An '08, '09 and a '15. I have run Mobil1 15w-50 CAR OIL in all three from the first oil change (or from 1,000 miles). The '08 HAS 101,554 MILES; the '09 was a write-off in summer '15 at 62,790kms (39,016 miles), replaced by the '15 which has 91,120kms (56,619 MILES) as of right now.

NONE have had any engine or clutch issues. Take from that 'what you will'!

(y)(y)

:cool:

That's very interesting! Makes me wonder what sort of friction modifiers M1 does (or doesn't) have. Well, certainly inexpensive to go back to it. Although I don't think I'll use the same viscosity as the original owner did - 10W-30 is certainly not ideal.
After watching this car care video it reminds me not to stay in 2nd gear for a long period of time while cruising around the neighborhood. Riding a car in manual transmission is almost the same as we do in motorcycles.

The goomer in your video is a classic example of the Dunning Kruger Syndrome...
ie, the goomer is in fact a learner that thinks its an expert.
Well in my Ford Focus MK2 (gasoline engine) I change the gear to about 2500 rpm, if I need to accelerate faster then I will change gears at higher rpm 3000-3500.
When I come to an intersection, I slow down by downshifting and using the brake. I use first gear only when I need to start and I have stopped completely.
When I wait at the traffic lights for the light to turn green, the transmission is in neutral. I mostly drive as I was taught in driving school and as my dad taught me.

The car has 240,000 km, original clutch and that's it, normal driving without going crazy, regular maintenance and regular replacement of parts and no problems with them.
LOL

Even though I reckon we have the worlds worst drivers down here (partly due
to appalling driver driver "training"), one thing our "Road Traffic Authority" has got right
is failing licence candidates that sit in neutral at traffic lights... because shit happens at intersections...
and if you're not ready to get the hell out of Dodge (being out of gear) you are a lamb waiting to be slaughtered...
especially on a motorcycle.
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LOL

(being out of gear) you are a lamb waiting to be slaughtered...
especially on a motorcycle.
Every time when I am waiting at intersection with my V650,I am to close as possible to left side of my lane, and few times that save my motorbike and me from accident.
Several times people with cars passed me with screeching tires when braking because they were not paying attention and braked suddenly at the last moment.
I keep my car (and motorcycle) in gear and clutched at stop lights for other reasons in Detroit 馃槀
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I have or have had THREE V650s - all brand new. An '08, '09 and a '15. I have run Mobil1 15w-50 CAR OIL in all three from the first oil change (or from 1,000 miles). The '08 HAS 101,554 MILES; the '09 was a write-off in summer '15 at 62,790kms (39,016 miles), replaced by the '15 which has 91,120kms (56,619 MILES) as of right now.

NONE have had any engine or clutch issues. Take from that 'what you will'!

(y)(y)

:cool:
I take from that you live somewhere very warm. Having just visited your state two weeks ago...can confirm!!!
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I keep my car (and motorcycle) in gear and clutched at stop lights for other reasons in Detroit 馃槀
Always be vigilant of the "spontaneous valet" in Detroit!
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I always leave the bike in 1st gear at a traffic light. We were taught that for safety reasons- you don't want to be in neutral if a car fails to stop behind you. Also, slipping the clutch is necessary for slow-speed maneuvers. Doesn't seem to harm my clutch.

Comparing a car with a single friction plate is not the same as a multi-friction plate clutch on a motorcycle. However, I do see how his points and ideas apply to automobiles.
I agree with your first paragraph entirely Smiley...
even though I also believe that one should
not take what one has been "taught" as always being the best thing... as too many "experts"
are little more than parrots... I digress.

Most motorcycles
have multi plate clutches as you say; but heat and friction of multi plate clutch
systems is greater than a cars single plate system... when in gear and stationary.
ergo there's less stress on the cars single plate
clutch system if it is stopped in gear... as it has MORE clearance between the
pressure plate and clutch plate , and more clearance between the clutch plate and flywheel.

BMWs with a cylinder sticking out each side of the bike ["Boxers"] have a dry single plate clutch like most cars.

Please Note:
Imho it is best practice to remain in first gear when stopped at red lights!
whether you are operating a motorcycle or car; shit happens at intersections and when it does you may need to be good and ready to get the shit hell outa Dodge.

Not to mention, multi plate motorcycle clutches are remarkably durable.
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remain in first gear when stopped at red lights!
whether you are operating a motorcycle or car; shit happens at intersections and when it does you may need to be good and ready to get the shit hell outa Dodge.
Uh huh
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