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Riders who have cut their teeth in the urban jungle don’t understand the fear that can grip a traveling rider when the fuel light comes on while deep in the American Southwest. I’ve seen stretches of road with no fuel for over 100 miles, and on the Dalton Highway in Alaska, I undertook a section of road that I knew was too much for either my Harley-Davidson Electra Glide Ultra or the hardy Kawasaki Ninja 600 my companion was riding on the final gravel stretch to Prudhoe Bay. In most instances, a little common sense can go a long way towards making sure you aren’t stranded by simply filling your tank when it gets less than half-full while riding remote, unfamiliar roads.

Sometimes, the adventure gets the best of our self-control, sending us off half-cocked into the wilderness – or maybe we just get lost occasionally. You can, without too much trouble, carry some extra fuel with you. On the aforementioned Alaska trip, I strapped a five gallon plastic can on the passenger seat of the Ultra. When I got back to a more civilized environment, I fueled my bike and gave the can to a local bike shop. I considered the cost of the donor can to be a worthwhile insurance payment against getting stranded.

Off-road riders who routinely travel beyond their bike’s range buy fuel cans that are made to be mounted on motorcycles. Roto Pax and other manufacturers make cans in a wide range of sizes and designs mounting solutions that can be adapted to motorcycles. Still, storing that extra gas can be dangerous if not done properly...
Read more about How Do I Carry Extra Fuel On My Motorcycle? at Motorcycle.com.
 

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i personally got a couple metal water bottles from good with and some ark rod tubes and a bit of modding came up with this for about $5, im doing a write up on it now and will link when done
 

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My camp-stove uses gasoline too, so I carry a 1 gal. plastic gas-can bungee'd near my gear, w/ maybe 1L in it. Then when I'm starting onto something like the Dempster, I add a few more L, so it's almost full. It's on the seat in front of the yellow duffle.


 

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For $30 a set you can take a Large manual canister from Agrisupply paired with an MSR 30oz fuel bottle. You can strap or bolt this to almost any surface with no fear of it leaking. Since I use an old swiss jet stove to cook with I never worry about running out of coffee or gas, which are two very important things in the AM.

Here's the large manual canister for $4.99usd;

Manual Canister, Manual Holders, Tool Tube | Agri Supply, 67670

The MSR 30oz bottles can be found at Amazon with the solid twist tops.

This method has worked for me safely strapped to a Sportster on a 5000mile journey into the rockies from Alabama. The tubes' mounts and their seals never failed.
 

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So you fill this container with gas, or you put another container inside this with the fuel in it?
 

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So you fill this container with gas, or you put another container inside this with the fuel in it?
you put another container inside this with the fuel in it
 

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So you fill this container with gas, or you put another container inside this with the fuel in it?
I think he means THIS:
 

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Read more about How Do I Carry Extra Fuel On My Motorcycle? at Motorcycle.com.
As many of you know the Dalton Highway (415 miles/667 km) has a stretch from Coldfoot to Deadhorse that is around 240 miles between fuel stops. And much of that it Antigun Pass where there is not too much of anything but rough terrain. And then there is the Dempster Highway in Yukon BC (742 km/461 miles) that has about the same distance between fuel stops. Most (not all) bikes will NEED a little help making those stretches comfortably.
 

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My triumph Trophy can go 300 miles on a tank of fuel. Yesterday, I was on the bike 5 hours straight in high 40s temps.

The Versys could squeeze 225 miles if I wasn't pushing it too hard.

I had those tool tubes on the Versys. I used one for my chain lube and one for assorted tools and zip ties.
 

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I like this idea. So what size bottle did you buy for carrying the fuel? I assume the actual fuel bottle is NOT a typical stainless steel water bottle, correct? I've got a pile of those metal water bottle if they work.
 

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I like this idea. So what size bottle did you buy for carrying the fuel? I assume the actual fuel bottle is NOT a typical stainless steel water bottle, correct? I've got a pile of those metal water bottle if they work.
well your wrong. i use just normal SS water bottles i got from good will, and have had no issues
 

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well your wrong. i use just normal SS water bottles i got from good will, and have had no issues
silviefox is right,
I used two red bottles marked "Seattle's Best Coffee" on the bottom for fuel and a silver one for spare oil (it was a KLR after all).
Just look real close at pictures of "fuel" bottles online to see where the "Fill to" line is if you put gas in them.
I did replace the seals on them with Buna-N (Nitril) orings.
 
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Are the caps from the water bottles fuel resistant or do you just plan on cycling them thru?
I could see myself changing out the o-ring for a fuel proof one & forgetting it long enough to have the plastic cap break down & leak.
 
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