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I'm at the end of my first week of therapy for recovery from a hip replacement. It was done with the robotic assist. I have put up with it for over a year and knew that it wasn't going to get better or go away. I am 63 years old and also have knees that aren't in the best of shape. A lifetime of construction can be hard on a person. I have seen post from several of you having gone thru this. Any words of wisdom that you can share is appropriated. How long can I expect before I feel confident enough to ride, therapy is rough and I'm not in the shape that I should be. Thanks for your comments. Thoughts and prayers
 

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I'm in the same boat but have put off the surgery for years now. Will have to give in and get it done soon...
 

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Hey Wampus, heal fast!

I haven't had that surgery but did have back surgery a few years ago. My advice is to follow the doc's instructions, erring on the side of caution. Don't push it without his approval. It is easy a couple of weeks after surgery to feel pretty good, and then do something stupid. Don't do things you doc says not to do!

Also, a good physical therapist is your best friend. Hopefully yours will be experienced with hip replacements. Trust them and do the exercises. If you do what they say, you will recover well.

My mom is 88 yrs old and had 3 replacements done. The first she was about 58 yrs old. That one she wore out golfing, hiking, kayaking, etc. It lasted 20+ yrs. The second one the doc didn't do right, so it only lasted about a year, then she had it done a 3rd time. So she was about 80 for the last one. She still walks 9 holes of golf at least once per week, and works in her garden daily. She is relentless in doing the exercises per the physical therapist's instructions.

So hang in there and follow instructions!
 

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When I had antero-lateral hip replacement (left side) in October 2014 at age 69 and I promised the surgeon, and more importantly my wife, I would follow the physical therapy program to the letter. The antero-lateral procedure did not necessitate any muscles being cut and healed relatively quickly. With the help of a walker I was up and about the evening of the surgery, and was discharged the following morning. I was advised to use a walker for two weeks followed by two to three more weeks or using a cane.

The first piece of advice I received was not to sit more than 30 minutes at a time. He said that I should get up and move about regularly and I would heal much quicker. We had to stop six times on the 180 mile trip home from Portland to Central Maine so I could walk around the car twice before going another 30 minutes. It was a long trip but it can be like that in Maine. Looking back on it, in my opinion the therapy was uncomfortable but I didn't think it was rough. I'm told it's nowhere near as difficult as knee replacement therapy is. Anyway, I was riding comfortably, but somewhat tentatively, again the following spring - January as I recall.

The biggest concern was laterally overextending the left leg. The surgeon's most memorable piece of information was, "Do not laterally overextend your leg or the ball will most likely pop out of the socket and I will hear you scream." I reminded him that our home was 180 miles from his office and he reiterated, "I will hear you scream."

The lingering concern was, and is, that the left leg is the one I put down when stopping and should it slip I could risk the dreaded lateral overextension. Unfortunately, twice while riding my BMW K75S (one of our Maine bikes), my foot slipped, once on gravel and once on a wet surface. Rather than trying to "hero" the bike back upright I bailed out, landed safely but embarrassed, eventually wrestled the bike back up, and went on my way. I was twice lucky but not fool hearty, and decided it was sensible to exchange the K75 (heavy and top heavy as well) for a BMW G310R. I feel more comfortable now because the bike is so much smaller and lighter. I also suffer from a 28 inch inseam and also feel more confident now being able to flat-foot the G310R.

Are you walking without the assistance of a walker or cane? If your physical therapy program has been successful and you can flat foot comfortably, you should be back in the saddle fairly soon. The secret, grasshopper, is to listen to your body and go from there. ;)
 
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Thank you for the great comments and advice. Putting my left foot down at stops had become a major concern, I won't ride till I know that I won't hurt myself
 

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Thank you for the great comments and advice. Putting my left foot down at stops had become a major concern, I won't ride till I know that I won't hurt myself
Wow, I sometimes think if I adopted such a sensible attitude I not riding ever again. Then again, that's not very likely.
 
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