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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In my experience ratings make a significant difference in how a helmet is constructed. I discovered this when I purchased my last helmet, a Bell Star MIPS. The Bell Star is Snell 2015, Snell 2020 approved and has a Sharp 5 of 5 stars safety rating. My previous helmet, a Bell RS-1, has an ECE 22.05 rating but no Snell rating. The difference in size and weight between the two could not be more dramatic. This despite the two coming in multiple (5) different shell sizes. The more expensive Snell approved helmet is much larger and heavier but has a much heavier constructed shell, despite using more higher-tech materials, with a significantly thicker (twice as thick) inner foam layer.

I can't help think a Snell 2020 approval would significantly improve your chances of resisting a head injury compared to an ECE 22.05 rating. The lighter RS-1 is more comfortable but I would rather be wearing the Snell approved helmet in a crash. The extra weight of the heavier helmet is not really a disadvantage as you simply acclimate to it after a few minutes.

Another thing I notice with helmets is cheaper helmets have lots of soft lining foam making them conform to your head and comfortable to try on in the store, but in a crash, this simply provides and an extra area for your head to slap about before hitting the protective foam under it. The relatively expensive Bell Star has hardly any liner foam between your head and the protective, impact-absorbing foam.

 

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I will go for a Snell, an ECE, a Sharp rated helmet, but never for a DOT

Simply can't understand how a p.o.s. like this can be approuved/rated/certified ... doesn't make the dot certificaiton something serious



LOP
DOT.jpg
 

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Snell is the racing standard for speeds that I won't be riding. ECE is tested for speeds that riders on the road ride. The difference is the give in the shell. If I had to choose I'd go with ECE.
 

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I am from Europe, and how much I know here are ECE - rule (at least in my country- if I am not wrong)

The ECE (Economic Commission for Europe) standard, R 22.05, is the European version of the DOT standard, though its tests are more rigorous. It is recognized by over 50 countries, and by every major racing organization in the world.

So I use sharp to check helmet protection rate (tested in UK so I know it is 100% approved in Croatia ), and this helmets are ECE approved, so I know I will not have problems if Police stops me and check whether the helmet is approved under our laws.

My helmet:
Find here helmets with 5/5 ,find dealer in my country which have that helmet in store, visit shop, test 2 size. Find on internet shop with best price and order.

But if I check on Australian helmet test site
CRASH - Test results

my helmet have 61/100 point - protection
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Snell is the racing standard for speeds that I won't be riding. ECE is tested for speeds that riders on the road ride. The difference is the give in the shell. If I had to choose I'd go with ECE.
As the saying goes, it's not how fast you're going, it's how quickly you come to a stop. For example, if your head was to hit an immovable concrete barrier or car at say 30mph it's going to be fatal no matter what helmet you are wearing because deceleration will be almost instant. Conversely, a slide from 80 mph/160 kph can be walked away from if you have enough abrasion protection.

Given the above, I have to disagree with you about speed being a factor in ratings. It's simply about the level of impact a helmet will absorb and not transfer to the fragile brain.

The point of my prior post was that a Snell-rated helmet will protect your brain more than an ECE helmet will under identical circumstances, and both will protect more than DOT. Snell rated helmets protect more given there more impact-absorbing material, however, this comes at the cost of a more expensive helmet that is larger on the outside and probably weighs slightly more. Snell rating requirements are more stringent than the ECE rating requirements hence the differing construction. Sharp and other rating requirements benefit from a grading system rather than just a pass-fail outcome.
 
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