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Discussion Starter #1
I'm mulling over the idea of getting some warmer winter gear good down into the 20's and 30's F (-10C to +5C). Heated gloves and a heated jacket liner are looking interesting, but what do I know? This would be for commuting (30 minutes) or possible touring.

Presently using a mesh jacket with zip in waterproof liner, good to about 50F (10C) by itself, or down to freezing for short commutes with a fleece jacket underneath. My riding pants are superb for cold weather, so no changes needed below the waist.

Am I on the right track?

Is the FirstGear stuff ok? Durable?

How about controllers? Is FirstGear good?
 

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my experience with First Gear is limited so no help, but I would suggest when you look at a heated liner you go with one that has sleeves wired for heated gloves. It was suggested to me that I buy a heated vest because that would keep my core warm thus keeping blood circulation into my arms at a high enough level to warm me all over. My heated vest keeps my core warm but my arms don't seem to benefit. Plus when I wear heated gloves I have to run wires inside my jacket that are a PITA when it's time to fill up, and makes sealing the gap between glove and jacket a massive PITA!!
My gear is Tourmaster, reliable and reasonable but when I replace it, it will be with full sleeves and a remote thermo control whether handlebar mounted or through an app. Sometimes the more expensive choice is cheaper in the long run. Good Luck!
 

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Heated Jacket Liner rather than Heated Vest

Hi,


I use Gerbings heated jacket liner and gloves. Both of these have their own controller via a Gordon's Heat Controller.





This controller which is very easy to use, is virtually bullet proof. I chose it because of the 2 rocker arms which are easy to manipulate with gloves on. It is attached outside my jacket and has been used through various bad weather situations.


You could say that I'm a happy customer. :)
 

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Brain Dump on Heated Gear....

I'm mulling over the idea of getting some warmer winter gear good down into the 20's and 30's F (-10C to +5C). Heated gloves and a heated jacket liner are looking interesting, but what do I know? This would be for commuting (30 minutes) or possible touring.

Presently using a mesh jacket with zip in waterproof liner, good to about 50F (10C) by itself, or down to freezing for short commutes with a fleece jacket underneath. My riding pants are superb for cold weather, so no changes needed below the waist.

Am I on the right track?

Is the FirstGear stuff ok? Durable?

How about controllers? Is FirstGear good?

First Gear do not make their heated gear its just re-branded. Not sure who makes it now but Warm and Safe used to make it.

I bought my heated gear several years ago. I purchased both the Gerbings Microwire and Tourmaster jacket liners online to compare. Although they looked similar, the Gerbings had larger and better heating elements in the jacket liner covering more area and they were less bulky. Returned the Tourmaster and kept the Gerbings, which cost more.

The main problem I've had with my heated gear over the years is the connectors. All heated gear brands use the same coaxial connectors. You need to keep these clean and occasionally insert a thin knife blade into the centre pin to split it slightly to improve contact with the outer sleeve. There is a slot in the centre pin to facilitate this and Gerbings warranty coverage is lifetime and excellent. Never have had any issue with the Micro-wire heating elements themselves or the controller, just the connectors.

You will require a two channel heat controller for heated gloves and heated jacket liner. Being able to access the controller while riding is very important. I clip mine to my belt on the left of my jacket.

I would recommend investing in a heated jacket liner with a heated collar over a heated vest. The cost difference is not substantial but the warmth and versatility is. Also you can replace a jacket liner with a heated liner but not a jacket liner with a heated vest. A heated collar will keep your neck and head warm in the coldest weather.

A heated liner needs to fit tight over just a long sleeve T shirt or similar. It needs direct body contact to keep you warm. A loose liner will not work.

I love my heated jacket liner and gloves, but since moving to a different climate and riding environment my riding has changed and I don't use it as much so my be considering selling it. I now ride in a large metro area and don't do much highway riding anymore in the early spring and late fall.

Heat loss is a factor of speed and distance together and insulation alone does not work that well with 60mph of wind chill that creates cold drafts under layers of insulation. If you ride at slower speeds say in a large city, and with frequent stops you will not need heated gear in the coldest weather but for 1/2hr or more on the highway or rural B roads, heated gear will be almost essential much below 50F. It keeps your core warm, which keeps your limbs warmer with warm blood circulating.

Hope this helps. PM me if you are interested in a size Medium Gerbings microwire liner and size Large Gerbings T5 heated gloves plus a two channel Gerbings heat controller with optional belt clip, all with light use. I can send pictures. Gerbings size charts are online as are reviews of these products.
 

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Look at the overall price for jacket, gloves, controller, warranty, etc. when picking a brand.

I have the tourmaster synergy stuff because I found a vendor closing it out years ago. I would go with cyclegear stuff today because of ease of returns since I have a store within 35 miles of me.

If you go gloves, and a jacket that has connections for the gloves at the end of the sleeves you will save running the glove wires through your gear which is a pain when you are running errands etc., but make sure that the gloves have a separate controller. My first set years ago used the same controller for the gloves when you connected them to the jacket. You would burn up trying to keep the gloves warm enough.
 

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+1 on Gerbings. Keeps me warm when it's freezing. Planning to ride tomorrow, windy and 27F early morning west of Chicago. Gloves and jacket can be controlled by remote. At some point it gets so hot I have to dial it down or even turn it off. I have the remote on a phone holder.

Dollars add up quickly with this sort of gear but it's well spent when you can stretch your riding season few weeks into fall and even winter.
 

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...My heated vest keeps my core warm but my arms don't seem to benefit. Plus when I wear heated gloves I have to run wires inside my jacket that are a PITA when it's time to fill up, and makes sealing the gap between glove and jacket a massive PITA!!...
I use the TOURMASTER SYNERGY heated jacket-liner [which heats the sleeves and the neck-cuff] and the KOSO APOLLO heated grips on both my V650s, PLUS both have handguards which keep cold-winds from DIRECTLY impacting my hands.

I have done MANY long (10 to 12 hours...) rides in chilly (and SOMETIMES WET) weather, and along w/ pretty descent boots PLUS rain-gear over the top of my gear when called for, I've always been 'pretty toasty'.

:goodluck:
 

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i have a powerlet jacket liner, glove liners, and dual controller. works very well. unfortunately, i don't use the set up very often unless we get a really cold arctic front, or when i've head to the far north. the jacket liner UNPLUGGED is incredibly warm.
 

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I use the TOURMASTER SYNERGY heated jacket-liner [which heats the sleeves and the neck-cuff] and the KOSO APOLLO heated grips on both my V650s, PLUS both have handguards which keep cold-winds from DIRECTLY impacting my hands.

I have done MANY long (10 to 12 hours...) rides in chilly (and SOMETIMES WET) weather, and along w/ pretty descent boots PLUS rain-gear over the top of my gear when called for, I've always been 'pretty toasty'.

:goodluck:
the hand guards are a MUST in cold weather. glove seams will let in cold at speed and heated grips warmth will dissipate without the guards. Don't learn the hard way !
 

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the hand guards are a MUST in cold weather. glove seams will let in cold at speed and heated grips warmth will dissipate without the guards. Don't learn the hard way !
I did not find a perceptible difference in wind/cold protection with Barkbuster Storm hand guards between the seasons I used them and those I did not use them. Below a certain windchill level (temp/speed combination) insulated or heated gloves and/or heated grips are a requirement irregardless of hand guards IMO. All cold weather gloves are waterproof because a liner is required to prevent cold air infiltration into the glove. They are also cheaper than hand guards as are heated grips, and a lot more effective.

Hand guards exist to protect a riders hands from branches when trail riding and often as a cosmetic accessory too. The can sometimes provide lever protection too in a crash. I've found them to be pretty much useless for warmth though.
 

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I did not find a perceptible difference in wind/cold protection with Barkbuster Storm hand guards between the seasons I used them and those I did not use them.

I would politely disagree. In my case I was much more comfortable with the wind shadow created by Bark Buster Storms. In very cold weather my heated gloves were simply overwhelmed by the wind, but this may speak more to the quality of the glove.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How many spare amps of electrical power does the V650 have (2015)? I can't find a number in the owner's manual. It looks like a jacket liner plus gloves would be 10 amps draw at full heat.
 

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I did not find a perceptible difference in wind/cold protection with Barkbuster Storm hand guards between the seasons I used them and those I did not use them....I've found them to be pretty much useless for warmth though.
And I TOO will 'politely' disagree w/ you on this.

WINDCHILL is a reality, so as long as your gloves are exposed to 'wind', then you ARE losing heat to it [WHETHER this bothers you or not is ANOTHER question]. When the warm weather arrives I remove the plastic covers from my handguards to allow the COOLING winds to caress my gloves, and I went so far as to "re-engineer" the handguards on my Gen 3 so that the "plastic covers" are removable from the FRONT [the OEM Kawi way necessitates moving the levers to access those screws from behind the covers, making it more complex than necessary].

My pics show the OEM set-up in the first two pics, then followed by WHAT I've done (I left out the HOW...)! [I used some bolts I had in the shop for the set-up and trial fittings, then (LAST pic) substituted socket capscrews painted black.]
 

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How many spare amps of electrical power does the V650 have (2015)? I can't find a number in the owner's manual. It looks like a jacket liner plus gloves would be 10 amps draw at full heat.
I flunked math because that cute little honeychile sitting ahead of me had such fine legs. But if I remember my ohms law, and the charging voltage is app. 13 volts with a reported 336 watts then we sholud have around 25 amps.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Poking around in the Owner's Manual and the Service Manual there are some clues for those wondering about spare amps. The headlight is 55W on low beam, 110W on high beam. Each turn signal is 10W, so there is a momentary 20W when signaling (or 40W with emergency flashers on). The brake/tail light is about 4W. Momentary loads such as turn signals aren't critical if they are infrequent, as they will be sourced via the battery if necessary. Basic lighting power consumption therefore runs about 60W with low beam headlight, 115W with high beams on.

I can't find a basic power consumption of the ignition system or other onboard electronics, but let's toss in another 35W for all the electronics, which I think is a much higher estimate than reality. Thus total power consumption for the bike will be 95W-150W.

The alternator is rated at 24Amps current at 14V at 5000 rpm, which equates to 336W output. Some power is lost in the regulator but I believe we can ignore it as it is accounted for in the way the spec is written.

Rough numbers then give us 336W produced - 150W used = 186W of available excess electrical power. This is at 5000 rpm, not idle or near idle engine speeds. According to other threads on this forum the output near idle will barely run the basic load, leaving no spare power for heated accessories at low rpm.

Heated jacket liners commonly are rated at 90W, gloves at 30W-40W per pair, pants liners 45W-50W, and socks at 15W-20W per pair. A full outfit would be 180W-200W on full heat, which uses up all the spare electrons.

Jacket plus gloves would be 120W-130W on full heat. Good practice is to derate power supplies, so I wouldn't want to run more than this 120W normally, though on low heat setting the power draw would be much less. Since the regulator shunts the excess power to wasted heat, except at near idle engine rpm the heated gear shouldn't stress the system.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Yup, lots of assumptions need to be made with the way the specs are written. (Spec writing was one of the things I did back when I was a semiconductor engineer.) Heated clothing is spec'd as a power consumption at 12V, but it reads to me like a consumer spec not an engineering spec. Same with lamps.Plus there are always tolerances on both sides of the circuit, supply and demand.

I'll go look at the thread you linked. It looks like interesting and relevant data.
 
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