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Which brand of Heated Grips?


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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking at installing heated grips on my V in the next few weeks. I am thinking of going the route of purchasing an auxilary fuse bok and wiring them into that, in which I could also try and mount some driving lights.

I am pretty handy, and pick up things quick, so I am not dreadfully concerned about wiring (in fact, I need to rewire my LED License Plate lights. That in consdieration, is there any preference to one brand of heated grip or the other.

I am looking at Hot Grips vs. the Oxfords. Are there others?

I know confidently that I don't want to buy the wraps that go under after-market grips, but the grips that have the heater wired in.

Thanks for your input.
 

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I have Dual-Stars under BMW sport grips. I like the grips and wish the Dual-Stars were warmer. The OEM heated grips on my Honda ST1300 will absolutely roast your hands on the highest setting (4). Might be a function of being out of the airstream more than on the Versys, although I have KTM hand guards on the V. If I were to do it again, I think I'd go with the Oxfords.
 

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Most heated grips are nice for cool spring/summer/fall days. When it gets cold, you want heated gloves, which are a lot more effective. If you get something relatively cheap, like the Dual Star (made by Symtec) it can make a nice supplemental heat for those chilly mornings/afternoons you didn't plan for. If you are going to spend a lot more than that, I'd buy heated gear.

Gustavo
 

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I'm using Dual-Star heaters with the Rally grips they sell. Great combo and plenty warm. I'm usually on low at 40°F wearing medium weight lobster claws.
 

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been using Oxford Hot Grips (Heaterz in the US) since I've had the Versys, absolute godsend, woulnd't ride without 'em. Although they've not had much use the last 3..4 months I've occasionally had 'em on in August or September when returning home at dusk, or leaving early in the morning.

To me they are a "must have" especially if you are thinking of being an all year round rider
 

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I have to agree with Gustavo. I live in northeast PA, and usually ride all year round, as long as there is no snow, no possibilty of black ice and is at least 30 degrees F when leaving in the morning. I installed heated grips on my first bike. They worked very well to about 40 degrees. After that, tips of fingers and thumbs got numb after twenty minutes. When I got my next bike I went with Gerbings heated gloves. My hands/fingers never get cold. Gloves are a little bulky, but they make a thinner, more expensive pair that should work just as well. Whether to get heated grips or heated gloves probably depends upon the coldest temp you're willing to ride in, and how far you'll be riding.
 

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I am using Koso Heated grips, wired to trip when the head light is on, therefore, they can never be running if the key is on, but the bike hasn't been started. It is true, heated grips are good for cool weather, once it becomes cold, even with hand guards you need heated gloves. I am trying out Hippo Hands now, huge and ugly, but so far this morning it was 40 degrees out and I rode to work with my summer Held gloves and no heated grips on, I was very comfortable.
 

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Have Oxford grips and love:loveeyes: them. I rode Beemers for years and the Oxfords are as good as any of the OEM BMW heated grips I've had.
 

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One advantage of heated grips is not having to change gloves when the temperature changes...
That holds true to around 55°F, but any colder and the tops of my hands get waaaaayyy too cold in summer gloves. Medium weight lobster claws get me down to 24°F (with the Dual-Stars).....heated gloves would be even better.
 

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I have some sort of Cortech gloves that I most likely purchased from newenough.com. They worked well enough last night (rain, lots of wind, 38 degrees F - not all that much fun) as I rode home from work. These gloves work for my commute which is around 10 miles each way. For any long rides when it is cold, I would feel the need to have either heated grips or heated gloves. A coworker of mine uses heated grips and he commutes at least double my commute and we each ride all year long (except for when there is ice on the road). His name is Mark and he helped me (a lot) in changing out my worn OEM tires for my new Roadsmarts. Thanks Mark!

If I bought something heated right now, I imagine that it would be the Oxford heated grips. That being said, the heated gloves also sound like a dreamy way to ride in the cold. This is from recent experience with cold hands.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So my general consensus is that Oxford's are the way to go if in my possession (a FT student and working) most my traveling during the now colder months will be less recreational and more routed to travel between home and work. I don't want to hassle with the on/off and having to always bring about the heated gloves. There are a few gloves out there that have less insulation on the underside that comes in contact with the grip and more insulaton on the out side, this might be worth the expenditure as well (i need to get thicker gloves anyways)

Thanks all.
 

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I'm a fan of the heated jacket with handguards, vice the heated grips. I was originally going to go the heated grip route, but after recalling my experience with them on snowmobiles, I realized the jacket would be a better holistic approach. It's much more multi-function for cold weather and since it keeps my core warm, my hands don't get cold -I'm am sure the handguards help contribute to the latter.

The jacket route was about twice as much - $200 for everything, but well worth it in the long-run. In comparison to heated gloves, I think my jacket was the same price as most heated gloves.

I am a student as well, so I know the $ thing is a factor, but the jacket made the most sense for me, from the perspective of maximum utility.
 

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Love my Oxford Hot Grips, specially on a "crisp" morning or evening... and even more when there is snow on the mountains and that chilly wind sneaks all the way to us. I ride with summer gloves all year round so I wouldn't trade in my Hot Grips for anything ;)
 

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not sure which post you referring to SM ;), but I ride with these:

http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/showpost.php?p=6610&postcount=4

Taken them through one fall now, hands unscathed, on closer inspection I saw the one palm shows a small tear now, so prolly gonna have to replace em :(

Nice and thin, mesh on the side to air hands for hot weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
So I finally got everything I needed together and installed the grips with some heat-resistent expoxy. Hopefully they'll work, they are pretty warm even on just 50%, and after the hussle and tussle it was to get them on (had my first Harbor Freight tool break, and the clutch side grip was a tad small for the knurled end of my Pro-Taper bar), it better work for a while.
 

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Hey Mike - I just got the Oxford grips and my Pro-Taper clutch side is knurled, like yours. How did you get this side on?

Thanks in advance for your answer!

Robin
 

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Discussion Starter #20
After first trying to use the epoxy as a lube, a just took a look at how much the knurled end was taking off and deemed it was okay to force it on since nothing eletrical was showing. I filed the handle bar as best I could with a the sharp edge of a chisel (wouldn't recommend, but it was all I had), and then pounded the thing on. I had some plastic shavings, but not enough to keep me concerned. One thing I would suggest is to use something flat like a block off wood--or use a mallet--too pound on the grip with. I had a finishing hammer, and while using it lightly, there is a outer portion of rubber that serves as a spacer that likes to tear away. Its nothing consequential if it does, and you can't noticed mine since I have hand-guards on anyways, but just cautioning you.

Hopefully that process enlightens you, I had to quickly come to solution to the kurnled handlebar with what tools a I had, and so explains the medieval methods of getting the grip on, which I though prior to starting would just slip on.
 
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