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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I'd like to preface this post by saying that I've been riding for about 5 years...BUT...I've never gotten into any sort of modding or features and whathaveyou. I currently have a 2014 Versys 650.

So I decided to try my hand at installing some heated grips as the weather is starting to get cold. I ordered a set of BikeMaster heated grips (https://amzn.com/B009Z1KQ2M). As per the instructions, they recommend connecting the ground to a solid ground and connecting your hot end to the ignition wire. That's fine.

I purchased a continuity test and was able to find a Aux connection by the battery. When the ignition is turned on, I get continuity. When the ignition is off, no continuity. I've concluded I've found the aux ignition wire.

However, when plugging the heated system into the (I think) Aux ignition wire, there is not enough power for the grip. The controller just blinks.

As of right now, I've got it straight connected to the battery and it works great. I just have to ensure I turn them off.



The question I have is thus- Do you guys have any input that would help me resolve this situation? Am I doing something wrong?

I'd appreciate any input you guys might have!!

Thanks!
 

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Buy a better set of grips......Amazon has the best price....

 

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I agree. Amazon does have good prices.

Unfortunately those grips are not an option for me.

Any other suggestions?

Its been a long while back but i believe someone on the forum added a switch to their heated grips so they could switch them on and off.
 

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You need to wire in a relay. A standard automotive relay from your local Auto-Zombie should do the trick.
The relay will allow more direct power from the battery that will be automatically cut off when the bike is turned off.

Here's a link to a thread over at TriumphRat with the same question and a diagram for a relay:
Relay install for heated grips - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
 

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I agree. Amazon does have good prices.

Unfortunately those grips are not an option for me.

Any other suggestions?
Add a relay, and "trigger" it from the wire going to your DRLs (that way it will automatically be OFF w/ ignition OFF). You'll connect your + and your - from the battery. You can also run the trigger wire thru an ON/ OFF switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
You need to wire in a relay. A standard automotive relay from your local Auto-Zombie should do the trick.
The relay will allow more direct power from the battery that will be automatically cut off when the bike is turned off.

Here's a link to a thread over at TriumphRat with the same question and a diagram for a relay:
Relay install for heated grips - Triumph Forum: Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums
I'm totally ignorant when come to automotive(motorcycle?) electric...anything.

Is a switch required? I just don't want a dead battery when I get up in the AM.
 

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Basically, the relay IS the switch.

A relay uses a small current to switch a bigger current. This way you can use a lighter duty switch to control a current that would burn out a small switch. Or is helps keep from running fat wires to the bars for a heavy duty switch to power high power driving lights, etc. In this case, it uses the automatically controlled small current from your accessory circuit to switch on the power to the heated grips. When you turn on the bike, power is switched on to the grip controller. Likewise when you turn off the bike, power to the controller is cut.

The controller for the grips has an "off" position, right? That's your switch. I don't know why you would need another switch. The relay will prevent power from reaching the controller and draining the battery when the bike is off.

So...
Look at the diagram. When you put power across terminals 85 and 86, it closes the switch between 30 and 87.
Note: I don't know where those numbers came from but they seem to be common in any typical automotive relay you get from any auto parts store.
So, you run a wire from that accessory circuit you found on your bike to terminal 86 on the relay. Run a wire from 85 to the frame to ground it. Run the power wire from the battery to terminal 30 and from 87 to the grip controller.

 

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Discussion Starter #11
Basically, the relay IS the switch.

A relay uses a small current to switch a bigger current. This way you can use a lighter duty switch to control a current that would burn out a small switch. Or is helps keep from running fat wires to the bars for a heavy duty switch to power high power driving lights, etc. In this case, it uses the automatically controlled small current from your accessory circuit to switch on the power to the heated grips. When you turn on the bike, power is switched on to the grip controller. Likewise when you turn off the bike, power to the controller is cut.

The controller for the grips has an "off" position, right? That's your switch. I don't know why you would need another switch. The relay will prevent power from reaching the controller and draining the battery when the bike is off.

So...
Look at the diagram. When you put power across terminals 85 and 86, it closes the switch between 30 and 87.
Note: I don't know where those numbers came from but they seem to be common in any typical automotive relay you get from any auto parts store.
So, you run a wire from that accessory circuit you found on your bike to terminal 86 on the relay. Run a wire from 85 to the frame to ground it. Run the power wire from the battery to terminal 30 and from 87 to the grip controller.

AHA! That makes perfect sense now. I saw the diagram from the triumphrat but I was confused about the "switch". Being that the controller has an "off" position it now makes perfect sense.

Thanks for the help!
 

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The video Weljo post ed are the AME grips that I currently have. My throttle side grip recently went TU and I've heard that AME has changed the style and no longer offer the individually controlled grips but one with a aux mounted controller. So I'm torn now trying to figure out what to do. I did send AME tech support an email hoping they will be able to help me out. They worked fine for 2 years...
 

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Ahhh there's a lot of weird info in this thread.

I have those grips. You do not need new grips. Those grips are fine. You do not need a relay, there are plenty of ignition-hot wires that you can tap into without causing any problems.

The wire you found is an ignition-hot wire, not the ignition wire. Meaning, it's a circuit that's only energized when the ignition is powered, but it isn't supplying ample current to energize your grips. I don't personally like to add anything to the actual ignition wire, like ever, but there's plenty of places to tap.

Since those grips give you so much line to work with, here is what I did:

Ground line, black wire, goes to the ground bolt under the seat towards the back. You'll see it has several wires terminating on it. For ignition hot, find your fuse block. It's got a hot-bus under it that energizes the block and then each circuit has its own fuse that separates it from the bus and powers the given circuit. You just need to find which side is "in" and which side is "out." On my bike, which is a 13, I BELIEVE but would not swear that the interior side (battery side) is the "out" and the anterior side (fairing side) is "in". The horn circuit has something like a 15A fuse on it. Tap into the "out" side, meaning the "fuse protected side", and you'll have ignition-hot, 15A service to power your hand grips. You'll never have to worry about nuking the battery by forgetting to turn them off, etc.

Alternatively, I can find you my other post about how to tap into the front relay connector and get switched (and constant-on) juice WITHOUT needing a relay.
 

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Ahhh there's a lot of weird info in this thread.

I have those grips. You do not need new grips. Those grips are fine. You do not need a relay, there are plenty of ignition-hot wires that you can tap into without causing any problems.

The wire you found is an ignition-hot wire, not the ignition wire. Meaning, it's a circuit that's only energized when the ignition is powered, but it isn't supplying ample current to energize your grips. I don't personally like to add anything to the actual ignition wire, like ever, but there's plenty of places to tap.

Since those grips give you so much line to work with, here is what I did:

Ground line, black wire, goes to the ground bolt under the seat towards the back. You'll see it has several wires terminating on it. For ignition hot, find your fuse block. It's got a hot-bus under it that energizes the block and then each circuit has its own fuse that separates it from the bus and powers the given circuit. You just need to find which side is "in" and which side is "out." On my bike, which is a 13, I BELIEVE but would not swear that the interior side (battery side) is the "out" and the anterior side (fairing side) is "in". The horn circuit has something like a 15A fuse on it. Tap into the "out" side, meaning the "fuse protected side", and you'll have ignition-hot, 15A service to power your hand grips. You'll never have to worry about nuking the battery by forgetting to turn them off, etc.

Alternatively, I can find you my other post about how to tap into the front relay connector and get switched (and constant-on) juice WITHOUT needing a relay.
In electrical "speak" that's called a double tap (one fuse used for two circuits) and on an OEM horn circuit that should work fine. I'm still a fan of a relay controlling the device power direct from battery. Replacing a burnt wiring harness on anything is not fun.
 

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Sure, I think those grips pull something like 3.1A on high though, horn pulls something like 2, so 5.1A on a 15A rated circuit is gonna be no big deal. I can't think of a condition, with the tap on the fused side, that it should nuke anything. Relays are super, but I still haven't found an application that necessitates them on a motorcycle. They make life EASIER, for sure, and protect against quiescent draw, but I've never had any issues. YMMV, of course.
 

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Having rewired a harness that I managed to crisp by off road lights, I would go the *safe* route and install a relay. They're inexpensive, and sure beats the crap out of replacing a wiring harness (which BTW in modern bikes requires 12 strong men, a monkey, and two managers to install properly.)

Just my hard-won .02.
 

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FWIW, those handgrips come with a waterproof switch that's designed to handle the current they pull. Installing a relay adds zero "safety" that a fused connection won't otherwise provide, assuming that you're not stripping wires and shorting stuff together and you're not overloading a circuit, it's just a way to get switched power from a constant-on source.

A lot of folks tap ignition or headlight wires because they're easy to find, a bad idea in case you blow the fuse--this is why I recommended the horn circuit---because on the weird offchance that you ever manage to blow that fuse (which you won't, it's 15A), all you're down is a horn.

There's plenty of good reasons to use the relay socket under the fairing for other, higher draw applications (12v adapter, higher-draw aftermarket lights, etc), but it's really, really overkill for this application. FWIW, it's also still fully possible to utilize the relay outlet as switched power w/o installing the relay, that's how I have my lights and 12v outlet attached. The pretty little relay plug is really just a way for Kawi to soak you for $40 for $1.25 in parts for something you really don't need. (And I suspect most folks believe that the under-fairing relay is fully powered off w/o the relay in place. Not true, it's one constant-on circuit and one switched-on circuit, their relay just uses one to control downstream access to the other, which is complete silliness.))
 
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