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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
First some of this is extracted from the Polaris Series regulator Install- I will give one version of hooking up a external after market relay-That Information will follow in a post below
I strongly recommend installing a voltage indicating device,heads up by signal dynamics or neat little voltmeter as in my photo here

neat little volt meter, extremely accurate, day or night

Neat Little Voltmeter / Fluke 189

So yesterday I was doing some testing, and felt my battery didn't have the original capacity. Using a eye dropper I added distilled water until the glass mat was wet at the top. My guess is it was down about 30% fluid, yes I know it says do not remove. Those are simple plastic caps that may seal 90% , it is the 10% that I am dealing with, so hooked up the trickle charger and will see what difference it makes on capacity . I did a 2 minute test using my Fluke 189, and know what to expect under normal load.

So the neat little voltmeter :




So I have two values , the lower value or first value is the voltage to turn the existing led and the second value is what is the threshold to turn on the next higher value. As a example 1 green led, 12.60 VDC minimum to turn on to 13.09 VDC at 13.10 a second green comes on. So here goes;

1 orange 12.10 minimum to 12.19VDC single orange
2 orange 12.20 minimum to 12.59 VDC two orange
1 green 12.60 minimum to 13.09 VDC one green
2 green 13.10 minimum to 13.49 VDC two green
3 green 13.50 to 14.50 VDC, three green around 14.7 VDC the orange to the right of the 3 green comes on flashing, above 15 volts it stays on .

So a Condensed summary for those less technically inclined. Green is Good That is as long as 1 green led remains illuminated , your battery will be within 95% capacity, once you go / reduce to two orange you are discharging your battery, since this is current per hour going out = to voltage , it is hard to say what capacity you are losing. As a example our Versys uses a 10 amp hour battery, so the difference between what the stator puts out and what is being drawn from the battery may be for example 3 amp at 12.59 VDC the two orange or ( watts is voltage times current 12.59 X 3 amp=37.7 watts)37.7 watt /HR , our battery is rated 10 amps X 12.9 VDC = 129 watts / HR ( base load is between 160 and 170 watts at 14.2 VDC ) so using those values you could probably ride for 3 hours before your fuel injection and everything started shutting down.
Alert with no stator output, you have less than a hour before shutting down, in a hours time I can be 60 miles or 100 KM from home, a very expensive tow.





View of the relay box 2015 Versys Photos



Top of 2015 showing the fuel tank rubber mounts, tank slides back to remove, also shown is the connector going to the front brake


Front brake connector , note purple wire I added for my headlight relay trigger cct. also note the blue with red tracer is the brake signal and a small piece of insulation was removed and I soldered the purple wire to it





Verspkd #1

So the relay box end , center connector is the headlight relay, below is the connector with pin #2 black wire about to be cut and my purple trigger wire waiting to be soldered



Verspkd #2 Note the Black pin #2 and gray pin#3 with the screwdriver between

here is the purple soldered to the old 3 phase output #1phase wire, pin #2 black, which has been taped the same as the brown wire, no longer needed, but still powered



If you look real close you will see the black wire taped with yellow tape, I use yellow as it is a standard for external live parts and gets your attention

Joint is taped



A trick to taping in confined spaces using a tool such as this bent screwdriver


 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Tools, T&B Crimps/ Crimpers/ Proper Crimp/ 4012941 C/W SEW Wire

The orange / black handle is T&B crimper, my favorite, even though it says non insulated, it works fine.




Various strippers and crimpers, I have several expensive crimpers designed for molex crimps and for the kawasaki crimps,1st is over $200 and 2nd close to $100. The main reason for mentioning cost of crimpers is directly related to the Triumph harness, the T&B sells for around $30-$40 , also shown is the Channel Lock blue handle , which works similar to the T&B, not shown is the Ideal crimper which instead of a indent, it creates a I , compressed crimp,also pictured is the Greenlee stripper crimper ( green handles), which doesn't have the same leverage as the T&B



T&B crimps, yellow is 10 gauge, blue is 14/16 gauge



A trick I use to increase surface area when using a larger gauge crimp with a smaller gauge wire, notice the wire doubled over, strip double the length required and double over, you now insert into the larger gauge crimp, which gives double the copper within the crimp, and more surface area.The orange with black tracer is doubled over. Also the extreme right is a red / pink crimp with a regular striped method as this is a 16 gauge fork crimp, the reason I show different gauges, is sometimes you are needing, 10, 14 and 16 gauge crimps for a single job, buying a single package of just 10 gauge can work using my method of doubling or tripling over the stripped copper.


The blue crimp is the T&B crimp the red / pink is similar to the Ideal and most other crimpers



One of the 4012941 Polaris Regulators with a homemade harness using SEW stranded 200'C wire and red high temperature silicone , included was a length of blue wire and a positap for triggering the headlight relay

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
So a common occurrence is headlight relay failures and next is starter solenoid relay failures, FYI we have a starter relay and a starter solenoid- the relay exists in the relay box.
So lets get started.

First I copied Verspkd post, as any other way and his post would be the header.

Here is one of the threads;

32 Jun 10, 2018




Hello guys!

So, we finally fixed this, my headlights were actually wired into the ignition, so they always come on and stay on when turning the key into the 'on' position. We found out later that the headlight relay was actually fused closed, and the headlights would not come on no matter what. This is actually a common issue with this relay, I saw a couple of posts were people replaced the relay box because the headlights did not come on after starting the engine. After I soldered everything back they way it was from the factory, we proceeded with the fix, as follows:

  • a 12v 40 amp 5 pin relay is needed for this (this relay will have the following numbers usually next to it's pins #85 #30 #86 #87 #87A)
  • a socket with the harness should be purchased with the relay if it does not include one
  • the following wires get cut from the Kawasaki harness that plugs into the relay box: Grey wire from pin #3, Blue wire with yellow tracer from pin #1 and the Black wire from pin #2 (Black wire gets taped up, for later use with Polaris regulators, as mentioned above)
  • on my harness, the ground from the starter solenoid, Yellow wire with red tracer, was located on the 10 pin socket of the relay box, pin #11
  • the new relay's wires that go onto the #85 and #30 pins, together, get soldered to the Kawasaki Grey wire from pin #3
  • the new relay's wire that goes onto the #87 pin gets soldered to the Kawasaki Blue wire with yellow tracer from pin #1
  • the new relay's wire that goes onto the #86 pin has to be tapped in and soldered directly on the Yellow wire with red tracer from the starter solenoid (found on the 10 pin socket on my bike), a little wire insulation has to be removed, this must not be cut
  • the 3 sockets from the relay box must remain plugged in after doing this, at least on my bike.

Thanks to everyone who replied here, and again, a special thanks to onewizard for guiding and helping me through this, hopefully this method he came up with will help some people save some cash in the future, and learn something more about their bikes, as I did.

Below you can find some photos of how the scheme looks for my bike, the installed relay, and a video of this actually works; the headlights turn on when turning the key to the on position, turn off while cranking the engine, and turn back on when the bike is started.

Font Rectangle Parallel Pattern Diagram
Circuit component Electronic component Cable Font Adapter


These are photos borrowed from @Verspkd of I think 2007 Stator Testing & Editing April 2020/ Polaris...
Motor vehicle Electrical wiring Gas Cable Computer hardware



Line Cable Gas Auto part Wire



Light Green Motor vehicle Automotive fuel system Automotive exterior
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Working on detail-more to follow.

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Cheap single pole single throw relay rated 40 amp, purchased in lot of 5 at $20 total including shipping C/W sockets










First some electrical jargon-explaining NO ( normally open ) and NC ( normally closed)
Not all relays are single pole double throw--a single pole single throw will only have 85 & 86 and contact 30 and 87
A single pole double throw will have additional 87a

So if you were adding a relay to say power auxiliary lights, coming on either when keying on or some other trigger means, you would be using a single pole single throw NO relay. What happens is supplying 12 volts to #85 and # 86 energizes the coil which produces a magnetic field pulling the armature with the contact on it closed. That contact is #30 and # 87
If you have seen my driving lighty on the barkbuster, I am using #30 and #87a for the white LED running lights

A excellent resource on relays;
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
This thread came about in a long process to help a member- many posts with technical info-once complete I may copy some of the posts for reference.

First thing is to convert colours of wires on your relay harness / socket to terminal numbers. I went into my parts and pulled a new relay. If you look on the bottom of the relay, numbers are shown, my relay is the B type . This is a example-your socket may be different , make your own colour to terminal number cross reference
85-Black
86-White
87-Yellow
87a-Red
30-Blue
It is possible to swap wires, looking from the side of the socket that you insert the relay from, is a tiny slot for a pin or jewelers screwdriver, to release the pin-I don't recommend this but I have done it.

This is going to be the simple-no auxiliary lighting, keying on brings the headlight on, pushing the start button turns it off during the duration of starting.

First, as long as the key is off, you could proceed, for those guys that drop stuff, accidentally drop a wrench across the battery positive-do yourself a favor. disconnect the positive terminal of the battery, put a rag over the battery post- your good to go.
  • The following wires get cut from the Kawasaki harness that plugs into the relay box-this is the six pin plug:
  • Grey wire from pin #3
  • Black wire from pin #2 , cut about 1/2 inch from the socket in case someone wants to re-establish OEM wiring (Black wire gets taped up at the two ends created)
  • Blue wire with yellow tracer from pin #1
  • -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • on my harness, the ground from the starter solenoid, Yellow wire with red tracer, was located on the 10 pin socket of the relay box, pin #11
  • the new relay's wires that go onto the #85 and #30 pins, together, get soldered to the Kawasaki Grey wire from pin #3
  • the new relay's wire that goes onto the #87 pin gets soldered to the Kawasaki Blue wire with yellow tracer from pin #1
  • the new relay's wire that goes onto the #86 pin has to be tapped in and soldered directly on the Yellow wire with red tracer from the starter solenoid, pin 11 (found on the 10 pin socket on my bike), a little wire insulation has to be removed, this must not be cut
@KBHD using a barrier block cut yellow with red tracer pin 11 wire leave at least 1 to 1.5 inches from the relay box- you may need to cut the tape on the harness, possibly use a 1 pole , we are cutting then stopping insulation and then joining g back with that barrier block, as well we are inserting #86
  • the 3 sockets from the relay box must remain plugged in after doing this, as the six pin socket contains some wiring from the ECU relay and some from the fuel pump relay
With the exception of the connection on pin #11 , yellow with red tracer ( a posi-tap would work) all other connections could be butt spliced, although even cutting the tape back on the harness, wire is short. Solder works best.

I assume that everyone knows those joints need electrical tape
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I was about to post my old option #2 Polaris Regulator Install & Editing/ Old / 2014 /...
Further thought it is a no go, two diodes would need to be added, all kinds of things possible to go wrong.
Below is posted # 212 from 2007 Versys 650 Electrical help needed!
(I was looking at the map upside down, that is why I had 1 and 7 instead of 3 and 2!) ok that is all cleared up now! On a happy note, you may not believe this, but I actually UNDERSTAND what you are saying....so there is hope for this project yet! That is the good news for today, also got a good reading from #3 to ground, but the bad news is I do not seem to get any set reading from #2, the meter just goes all over the place, which makes me wonder if I do not have the pin inserted properly, but not sure how to check that, have tried to adjust it but with no improvement. Then obviously I get nothing from connecting 3 and 2, with the meter or the wire. Side question: the light comes on as soon as I key the bike on, so how would I notice IF it came on with the #2-#3 wire connection? One of these days I might not even run into a problem when running a test? I hope.
Ok.keying on and light on is a defect on all Kawasaki Motorcycles, KLR,Ninja etc. only on a fully charged battery. Good news, for it to come on, that headlight relay needs to work. You meter reading is normal because you are reading voltage drop across the diode
To prove this to yourself, key on, provided the headlight is on, hit the start button for 1 second-I don't want the bike to start, this should turn the light off, next use the 1 second across 2&3 -light should come on!! this is a circuit that took me hours to resolve. On my 2015 I have a diode across the start solenoid coil circuit, as I don't want my light on until I am ready to ride.
 

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Good morning! I have read the links you posted, but getting a bit lost in the details, as I think they cover more than what I am going to do? Should I also be bypassing the starter to save myself any future problems?. I do appreciate the photos. As to the crimping or the soldering, I will take up either task or both if required, especially since buying a reliable relay box seems impossible. One side note, I re-did the testing of ohms from 1 to 3 as I did yesterday (as am paranoid now and re- do everything the next day) and I do not get the 00.00 reading, I get nothing really, meter just sits at the .0L ....when touching the sensors I do still get the 00.00....I am hoping that this reading does not really matter because the headlight came on with the 10 pin disconnected, so our problem is made obvious by that result. But just checking, just incase!
Now should I crimp or should I solder? Canadian Tire is gonna love me either way....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, never a dull moment. Checking 1 & 3 is now infinity? Two possibilities, one the spring is broken, depending how you hold it the contact closes. Two , from handling the relay box the contact broke free . I am the kind of guy that electrical doesn't heal itself.
The actual cost of replacing that relay is cheap. That area is tight, I have difficulty crimping there. The thing is, with the after market relay you get 8 inches of wire. You could use a posi-tap for pin 11 wire as we are talking milliamps.
The problem with soldering, a 30 watt pencil really isn't enough. Plus you need rosin core solder. Those photos are my buddies doing his 07 exactly as I describe. No time now but we should be posting in the technical discussion thread.

Bypassing the starter circuit is a bad idea, I don't think you would be too happy trying to bump start the bike with the headlight on.
One simple option, no soldering or crimping - a 5 pole insulated terminal block. Easily installed by anyone.
I will post a link later- sometimes other peoples problems make me come up with a solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am sure princess auto or any auto supply store carries a version of this. You need something for 15 amp and 14 gauge.

A block with say six places in, and out, using screw terminals and some sort of pressure plate. My most success was using "Barrier Block"


This first one is one of the top manufacturers Phoenix contact;


This is the style I was looking for, you can make it, 2 or 3 or 5 or whatever count you want. Testing later is easy as the terminals are recessed, take note of the view on the left, there is a small plate that is pushed onto the wire, the old way the screw went directly on the wire and many times cut strands.

I found many copycats on Ali Express, just a screw, no pressure plate

Product Personal care Material property Beauty Tints and shades
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is from 4 days ago post #209 of 2007 Versys 650 Electrical help needed!


Don't get involved electrically when you are tired--luckily I caught my own mistake

The connector has numbers embedded in the plastic. The connection is housed in a six pin connector. I am going to pull the drawing for the 2007 and check colour code-this could take me a hour to find it. Pin numbers and colours aren't shown together with Kawasaki .

Below is a screen shot from a 2007 service manual, it shows 1 and 2 side by side. How it works

Pin #3 is gray and also positive from the fuse box--Fuse circuit #5


The first way is, the instant the motor is running, the stator outputs AC, one of those phases is tapped within the harness, that is all 3 wires go to the regulator, but one of them has a tap off of it and goes to pin #2, the first above 8 volts AC that goes to pin two, gets rectified by that relay diode, that instant, energies the relay coil--once the contact of the headlight relay closes, it does two things, it takes the 12 volts at pin #3 and sends it to pin #1 and the light is on. It also provides positive power going through the diode of #1 to the line below pin #2, that diode right next to #2 does two things, it rectifies the AC from the stator at start and also blocks current flow from pin #3 once the relay is on.
So the relay latches in the on position by way of power from #3- we are proving that by the fact the key is on but the motor isn't running
Last , the start solenoid actually turns the headlight off - that is explained below--if you want to know how, ask but it may be hard to grasp, in reality, if the start solenoid coil wire blew open, you could bump start the bike but you would have no headlight, as the ground of the solenoid is also the headlight relay ground.

So we are putting a pin or wire in #2 black and a pin or wire in gray #3.
With a meter and keyed on go from #3 to ground VDC and you should get 12 volts
Connect the meter to pin #3 and pin #2 and you should get something close to battery voltage
Last, connect momentarily, #2 & #3 for 1 or 2 seconds The light should come on!
If it does -Next hit the start button for one or two seconds we aren't trying to start we are proving the circuit works!

Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Diagram
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am working on specific instructions for @KBHD

Post 216 & 217 2007 Versys 650 Electrical help needed!

Going for simple-pull the six pin socket with #1 & #3, I want you to test the relay box pin 1 & 3, using ohms-you lowest scale. Nice having a photo of your new meter.
Turn the selector to ohms, you are using the right two sockets-common and volts/ohms-HZ and diode test. So let us see how sophisticated your Canadian tire meter is.
Short out your leads in ohms, notice the reading, while shorted out, press REL button. That subtracts the value of resistance in your meter leads, and the display should read 0.00- next-and do not change range or turn the meter off- I want you to measure as in my first sentence here.

A second way of proving this circuit as defective, pull the 10 pin socket out on the relay box. 12 volts goes directly to the pin #3 , just traced the electrical drawing, with the key on and the 10 pin socket disconnected from the relay box, it is impossible to turn the light on. Unless someone has modified the circuit. The ground for the headlight relay coil goes to pin 11- with it disconnected like I said-impossible.

And the final outcome;;

Model number on the meter incase you cannot see is: 052-1899-2 Mastercraft.
Following the first set of instructions I get a reading of 00.00, and I am including a photo of the new, fancy meter鈥..
With regards to the second set of instructions, I pulled out the 10 pin socket and turned the key on, and the light DID come on? I really do not think anyone has modified anything on this bike, so what is up with that? View attachment 184423
Finally getting somewhere

I read your post twice - 00.00 across #1 & #3 ?? , or the same as shorting your leads out should read 00.00- if this is what you are saying, your contacts are welded closed

That is electrically impossible-- as far as control voltage using relay logic!
The coil circuit of the headlight relay depends on the 10 pin plug for the ground of the coil. So you have either shorted contacts or someone bypassed the relay. Testing #1 & #3 using ohms, should be infinity, if not-problem is solved-you either need to use my workaround, try and take the relay box apart or replace the relay box.


Discussion Starter 路 #221 1 d ago


Ok- first off, you stating that "we are getting somewhere" almost made me have a heart attack! We never get anywhere!! Sorry for not being clear on the test- yes to the reading 00.00 when shorted AND when reading 1 and 3.
I do know of a guy in Victoria parting out the same bike, as I mentioned, will try him for a new relay unless you advise just getting a brand new one, obviously at this stage of the game I do not care to cheap out! I doubt anyone "bypassed the relay", so how do contacts become shorted? And could this little box really have been the cause of ALL my problems? (pls say yes)...
Also wondering why none of the three brilliant mechanics I took the bike to would not do what is a very simple test? Hopefully I do not die of joy before you reply. Thanks AGAIN!
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@KBHD Here we go;
Post # 10 shows barrier terminals, for you, this is the best way, I can post a photo if needed about tap connections and how to parallel using the terminal block-barrier block

Post #5 shows a relay, but one with the harness Princess auto has them on sale- $2.81 ea. get two or 3 https://www.princessauto.com/en/30a-relay-and-socket/product/PA0008080376
Copied from post #6 my relay colour code;
85-Black
86-White
87-Yellow
87a-Red
30-Blue

Post #6 explains identifying your relay colours if you wish I can do a conversion once you have the relay. It is much easier. as an example Post #6 I have a list of colours I had
#86 as white
So I would do a connection cross-reference for myself. In that example Relay White to Yellow with red tracer former pin 11 barrier block
Relay Black to Grey former pin 3
Relay Blue to Grey former pin 3
Relay Yellow to Blue with Yellow tracer former pin #1
Relay White to Yellow with red tracer pin 11 split at & joined at barrier block
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So if you never soldered before, doing electrical connections that carry power-I refer to power in the 12 volt system that anything that uses 20 or more watts. Not a good idea, extended contact can cause the insulation to melt, solder to travel up the wire making what should have been a 1/2 inch solder joint a 1.5 ich stiff connection. Secondly, there is what is called a cold solder connection, a 30-watt pencil hits two 10 gauge wires and cools instantly, possibly freezing to the wire, not enough heat and volume of heat for a quick solder connection. Using the wrong solder, high temperature-been there done that, same issues. Like crimping, starting over isn't an option-no such thing as wire stretchers!!

Crimping, many pitfalls, the most troubling is the quality of crimp, that crimp needs to contain roughly the same amount of conductive material to which it is joining. Many connectors fail miserably in this, I use and have used 3 manufacturers in Canada T&B is my top supplier-Burndy and Ideal second. A proper crimp will exceed the wire it is connected to-what do I mean by that? If crimped properly with a proper crimp and the correct tool, and the wire is oxide free-mechanically if attempted to pull apart, the wire should fail in a place other than the crimp, if overloaded electrically, the wire should fail at the power source or at the power load, not at the crimp.



I am hoping this is enough-:ROFLMAO::eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Number 15 sounds good!!:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:(y) where is my rolling eyes emoj馃槒
 

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Ok- seemed to take me a day to realize we have a new thread. Just confirming a few things: First, it sounds like soldering or crimping are both OUT due to skill and tools required, but am I correct to understand that if I buy the "barrier block"? Then I do not need to do either? And basically the 6 pin of the relay box is screwed, so what we are doing is by-passing that, BUT we are only by passing some of the wires and leaving all other things plugged into the relay box because they are important for other things.....The only thing I need to buy is the thing in post 5? as it comes with wire? If so what about the picture in post 10? Do I need both these things? Your description of what wire goes where is good, just need to dumb it down to: buy this, disconnect that, reconnect here....no need for crimping or solder, and that is that. Which, you have probably given but I'm not quite there (as per usual)....Photos are and were very helpful thanks for this and sorry for these questions!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Ok- seemed to take me a day to realize we have a new thread. Just confirming a few things: First, it sounds like soldering or crimping are both OUT due to skill and tools required, but am I correct to understand that if I buy the "barrier block"? Then I do not need to do either? And basically the 6 pin of the relay box is screwed, so what we are doing is by-passing that, BUT we are only by passing some of the wires and leaving all other things plugged into the relay box because they are important for other things.....The only thing I need to buy is the thing in post 5? as it comes with wire? If so what about the picture in post 10? Do I need both these things? Your description of what wire goes where is good, just need to dumb it down to: buy this, disconnect that, reconnect here....no need for crimping or solder, and that is that. Which, you have probably given but I'm not quite there (as per usual)....Photos are and were very helpful thanks for this and sorry for these questions!
Post #10 barrier block, photo shows my preference-stay away from the spring operated ones, use the simple screw ones as photo. Instructions start post #13 with a link to princess auto, no idea if they are sold out-$3 for a 30 amp with socket, buy 3 or four-well I paid $20 for 5 of the 40 amp with socket 5 pin ( as in 5 wires out)

One concern is pin #11, you need to cut that wire then attach both ends into the barrier block plus the white #86- my concern is cutting that wire too short. One thought is a posi-tap-no wire cutting and fairly easy-that white #86 carries something like 0.036 amp-nothing, barely half a watt.
And yes, no soldering or crimping, no special tools except a good screwdriver to match the screw of the barrier block. Detailed Instructions to come after parts arrive, there is a trick to wiring into terminal blocks-will explain later and with a photo.
1 minute 41 seconds in , the blue one is shown

Any questions post in this thread
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A short thread on repairing a relay box replacing the headlight relay, C/W photos-And why adding an external 30 or 40 amp relay for the headlight is superior to repairing the relay box which requires soldering skills and PCB skills ( printed circuit board ) I have both skills ( complete solder work station, vacuum and hot air) , I would still go with the 40 amp , why screw around with something that will fail again-HOWEVER - I do have LED headlights-馃ぃ

 

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Ok- post tap! Brilliant! Right up my alley of "no brain electrical type things", I have ordered everything else but just want to make sure I get the correct "size" of posi tap...can you confirm? Looks like everything else will come next week, so there is still hope to have a working moto by Xmas......haha
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Ok- post tap! Brilliant! Right up my alley of "no brain electrical type things", I have ordered everything else but just want to make sure I get the correct "size" of posi tap...can you confirm? Looks like everything else will come next week, so there is still hope to have a working moto by Xmas......haha
They usually go by colour. Blue should be 16 gauge. You need to research that. The wire out of the regulator is no more than 16 gauge. The wire on those relays is 16 gauge, just checked my 40 amp relay, 16 gauge 600 volt.
You want a positap designed for 16 gauge wire, as part is like a saddle.
Just saw a package with blue ones, said 16 to 18 gauge, near the top of the package.
 
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