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Discussion Starter #1
With all the talk about proper break-in procedure and keeping rpms at 4K for the first 600 miles, I'm curious as to what ground speed that translates into. I know terrain, rider weight, etc. will affect ground speed, but roughly what kind of speed are you looking at on flat ground, 6th gear?
 

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With all the talk about proper break-in procedure and keeping rpms at 4K for the first 600 miles, I'm curious as to what ground speed that translates into. I know terrain, rider weight, etc. will affect ground speed, but roughly what kind of speed are you looking at on flat ground, 6th gear?
I'm currently doing the brake-in in mine and keeping her under 4K is really, REALLY hard! ;)

Once wound up, I'm doing about 52-54 MPH indicated (around 47 MPH actual?) in 6th gear turning 4,000 rpms.

I'm 6'1", 180 lbs.
 

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With all the talk about proper break-in procedure and keeping rpms at 4K for the first 600 miles, I'm curious as to what ground speed that translates into. I know terrain, rider weight, etc. will affect ground speed, but roughly what kind of speed are you looking at on flat ground, 6th gear?
Why would terrain, rider weight, etc. affect "ground speed". The vehicle has fixed gearing that translates engine speed into tire rotation speed at a fixed ratio. Just look at the speedo when the you are at 4K. Then subtract about 8% for the optimistic speedo. -- Hank

P.S. It may be the case that rider weight would have a very small effect to the extent that higher weight would compress the tire at the bottom reducing rolling radius ever so slightly.
 

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also, keep in mind, following the recommend break in is not the best method of breaking in your engine. For the first 100-200 i do keep the revs under 4k but after that anywhere up to 6k, just be sure to shift up and down through the gears, try not to maintain engine speed for too long and always give the engine a few minutes to warm up before putting it under load. Kawasaki puts the same recommendation (first 600 under 4k and first 1000 under 6k) on all their bikes whether they redline at 16k or 6k
 

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Discussion Starter #5
hsfarber,
My point regarding terrain is that if you are riding up a 10% grade in high gear with 4K on the tach, you are not going to be going the same ground speed that you would obtain if you were running in high gear, 4K on flat ground.
 

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actually you would. the gearing is fixed. per gear, the same engine speed is always the same ground speed. the only difference is home much gas you are pumping into the engine. So the engine does do more work to go up the grade but the work is done in terms of fuel not engine speed. So in 6th gear at 4k you will be doing the same ground speed up a hill, down a hill or under water, if you can get ur bike to run under water (some find this difficult, something to do with the air intake and temperatures).
 

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to test my "theory" put ur bike up on a stand so the rear wheel is off the ground, put the bike into sixth gear and rev the engine to 4k. then remove the bike from the stand, get on and ride it down the street in 6th gear at 4k. the speed you see on the speedo will be the same as when the bike was on the stand.
 

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I'm in break in now, and 4,000 has been about 55 mph. This hasn't bothered me as I've been driving the curvy back roads around Atlanta and doing a lot of shifting to vary the rpms and using engine braking to seat the rings.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The more I think about it, I can see the flaw in my logic. 4K is 4K, regardless of where/how you are riding. Please forgive my momentary stupidity!
 

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4k=55mph
5k=70mph
per speedometer reading on my bike
I did the same on my bike for break-in, alot of the curvey 55mph rural highways around here, didn't take long for the miles to add up!
 

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Here's something I don't get - Some of you have suggested that less than 4000rpm is lugging the engine; yet, the manual says not to exceed it. I know what it feels like to lug an engine, but it still makes me wonder what the stresses of operating the Versys at such low speeds are. Anyone shed some light on this?
 

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I ran my engine in totally by the book, changed oil about 600 and again about 1500. I now have over 23k miles on it and now run the twisties between 8000rpm and 9000rpm.

I don't use a drop of oil between changes (about every 3000 miles) and still on original chain and sprockets and I thrash this machine--------------what a bike. I run with liter bikes and even with my dubious riding skills I can easily keep up, unless we get long straight aways-in the twisties I'm all over them.

Just to bring it back on thread, IMHO, take it easy for the a couple of thousand, then let it rip. I reckon I'll get 50-60k miles before I need look at a valve adjustment, plugs were perfect at 18k and even if I don't keep the bike that long, the engine would be good to 100k miles.

Machog
 

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Here's something I don't get - Some of you have suggested that less than 4000rpm is lugging the engine; yet, the manual says not to exceed it. I know what it feels like to lug an engine, but it still makes me wonder what the stresses of operating the Versys at such low speeds are. Anyone shed some light on this?
Running below 2,000 is usually lugging the engine on the V. Above that and you should be fine. I think many would say that shifting at 4,000 rpm and below isn't quite as fun as say 7,500 rpm. I did the 'motoman' thing and mine runs great and uses no oil...will hit 23,000 miles this week and am still in the honeymoon phase with her. :)
 

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I agree El Tig, anything under 2k is lugging down the engine, but i typically drive around 2.5k - 3k and the engine feels smooth. The only time i find my engine exceeding 4k is highway riding, or when I feel like blowing off some steam.
 

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Lugging the engine is not only influenced by rpm. It is also influenced by throttle position, and load, all at the same time.

So if you are accellerating up a hill, with luggage or a passenger or a heavy rider or a strong headwind or a soft road surface - to prevent lugging the engine (under 4k) you would need to be gentle with the throttle opening, and just not accellerate quite so hard.

If you are a average to light weight rider, riding only on level roads, little or no luggage, no passenger, with gentle accelleration (low throttle opening), you would probably never lug the engine in the 2k-4k range.
 

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Motoman

I did the "motoman" break in and after working with very large diesel engines for most of my working life I think it is by far the best way to break in any new or rebuilt reciprocating engine. Check it out.
I've seen brand new Caterpillar 600 HP engines broken in on a load bank and run at 1200 rpm with load brought up to 110% of rated capacity within four hours.
The Versys engine is very happy at 5000 rpm and should be run there right out of the box. Vary the speed and accelerate hard and then off the gas all the way. The photos in "motoman" can't be more convincing.
 

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+1
I completely agree with Motoman's assessment and way of breaking in new engines. My next new vehicle will be broken in according to that method.
 
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