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These are the Battlax T30 their version of the RP2 or maybe RP3, A dual compound rear tire for sport touring. I had one very short wet ride after I put them on but really didn't get a feel for them. So today I got out for a couple hundred miles in nice weather. After checking the pressure, 32 front and 36 rear I geared up and took off. I took it easy at first as they felt very slick until I had scrubbed them in a bit and then started to work them a bit harder. NICE! They felt very light but stuck like glue. Lighter, I think than the PR2s did though both seem to stick well on the back roads here. They tracked very nice and still gave good feedback on what was going on. I found I was carrying more speed through some of the turns than I normally did, 10-15 mph in what were 60 mph corners for me i was running 70+ mph and still felt very comfortable not like I was pushing. On the super slab they rode smoothly and strait. Only thing is they are fairly noisy, sounding like a turbine. Not really a problem for me as I almost always wear earplugs. How they will do into wet I can't really say the ride I did in the wet last week was very slow and only 5 miles to the store and back.

Will they win my heart over the Michelins? Well the last set of PR2 I had on the bike did everything I ask of them without a problem, offered traction and hung in there in the wet. PLUS lasted almost 13,000 miles, by my maintenance log, and still had some miles left when I changed them out. Having had ONE blow out on a motorcycle years ago I will try to avoid any more thank you! The one thing I found on the PR2s is at the end of their life they start to feel very heavy and lifeless. Not an altogether bad thing as you know it's getting time to order new meat! I had Pirellis and they stuck like glue BUT they were toast at 3,000 miles and when they went off it was like a switch had been thrown! These were on my Buell and it ate tires so I'm not slamming Pirellis and they were a out and out sport tire NOT a Sport touring tire.

Now to see how long the Bridgestones will last. I don't abuse my tires BUT I don't baby they either.
 

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These are the Battlax T30 their version of the RP2 or maybe RP3, A dual compound rear tire for sport touring. I had one very short wet ride after I put them on but really didn't get a feel for them. So today I got out for a couple hundred miles in nice weather. After checking the pressure, 32 front and 36 rear I geared up and took off.
Interesting. In my manual they called for 36/42 psi.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Interesting. In my manual they called for 36/42 psi.
I went by what Kawasaki calls for on the bike to start. I'll change it up from here to get them to stick and track better, even though they are doing a good job now. The tire list the max pressure they are rated for NOT what the bike set up up for. Too much is just as bad as too little. You'll find the bike "Skating" and "Chattering" in rough sections and turns if them over inflated. Too little and the bike will wallow all over the place and be hard to hold a line in a turn. Both will shorten the life of the tire some times dramatically. I don't claim to be a Tire Guru or anything just what I have learned by reading, being told and the experience 45+ years of riding. AND yes I am still learning, when I stop learning best cover me up before I stick the place up! :D
 

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I went by what Kawasaki calls for on the bike to start. I'll change it up from here to get them to stick and track better, even though they are doing a good job now. The tire list the max pressure they are rated for NOT what the bike set up up for. Too much is just as bad as too little. You'll find the bike "Skating" and "Chattering" in rough sections and turns if them over inflated. Too little and the bike will wallow all over the place and be hard to hold a line in a turn. Both will shorten the life of the tire some times dramatically. I don't claim to be a Tire Guru or anything just what I have learned by reading, being told and the experience 45+ years of riding. AND yes I am still learning, when I stop learning best cover me up before I stick the place up! :D
I know that people with lighter bikes tend to run lower pressures, but our bikes aren't all that different in weight. I seem to remember my friend running low to mid 30s in his Ninja 650. I've pretty much always owned bikes running 120/70-17 180/55-17 tires and they've all called for roughly 40 psi. On a track where they get hot, I take them down to ~30 psi.

I find the tires just fine. I had to ditch the footpeg curb feelers though. They were digging in and upsetting the chassis in corners way before I was running out of tire. So far so good, though I did get lazy this afternoon and nearly ripped my foot off the peg when I left my toes hanging over instead of propped up on the footpegs.

I like the BTs so far, but still haven't got out in the wet or cold with them. How they react in those conditions separates the wheat from the chaff IMHO. Pretty much all rubber these days sticks fine on warm dry roads. I agree that mileage is another important consideration. I am however willing to trade off a little of that for tires that work well in all weather conditions.
 

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Check your manual or your swingarm label again... It's 32 psi front, and 36 psi rear.

Going by the Metric specs; 225 kPa = 32.63 psi, and 250 kPa = 36.26 psi.


saddlebag has the V1000
 

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Discussion Starter #8
saddlebag has the V1000

I didn't even think of that! I'm looking in the owners manual and shop manual and both say 32 F 36 R and the same is on the head tube sticker on the bike wondering what he's talking about!

Guess I'll have to learn to say "This is a 2012 650" now that the 1000 is out in the USA as more guys will be showing up with that. They are going to have fun when someone heer is talking about syncing the FI or check valve on a 650. :rolleyes:
 

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I'm satisfied with the T30's so far. I haven't had a chance to ride in the rain yet but they feel sure-footed on the backroads of Virginia and the windier roads in West Virginia. I've kept mine at about 35/39 so far (it's a V1K).

With that said, I imagine I'll switch to PR4's when the T30's are toasted. I had PR3's on my Ninja 1000 and I've grown accustomed to the feel of the PR's.
 

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I can't wait to get some T30s on my V
The stock Dunlops are trash.
I run air at what it says on the sidewall
Not what some tech put on the book because
the company lawer said to.
 

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I replaced the stock Dunflops on my V with T30s. The Dunflops were wore out after only 2600 miles. After 4100 miles my rear T30 is pretty worn. I"m guessing it will be to the wear bars in another 1000 miles. The front still looks pretty good. I'm running 33/38 PSI

Just spent a weekend flogging the bike through the TN and NC mountains. No complaints on how the T30s handle. I'm going to replace the rear before going on a long trip so I'm not likely to get it to the wear bars.
 
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