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Discussion Starter #22
I ride in the north of Thailand, mix of highways, mountain roads, odd bit of offroad. I get 30.7 km/l consistently. I'm not slow and not manic fast just MOR.
I find it rather impossible. unless there is something very unique about your bike. Is it what your dashboard is showing, or you count how many liters you put in the tank vs the distance covered? I ride in Thailand too, and so does my friend. Perhaps, driving below 100km/h, we get 25km/l tops.
 

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I read a lot of motorcycle forums and there are always "fuel economy" and "tire longevity" threads which are mostly pointless.
For every rider that claims 12,000 miles out of a tire or gets 70mpg, there will be equal number who claim 4,500 miles or 35mpg to skew the average. As soon as someone claims 70mpg then everyone else thinks there must be something wrong with their bike. 🤷‍♀️
 

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...I noticed that the 'Average' shown on the Dashboard is not very accurate, often completely wrong....
I leave my TRIP COMPUTOR ('15 V650) at RANGE, simply because (IMHO) - the MPG figures are NOT correct.
 

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I leave my TRIP COMPUTOR ('15 V650) at RANGE, simply because (IMHO) - the MPG figures are NOT correct.
Yes computer calculate wrong (my opinion) so I also set on display to show me range. Last trip computer show 4.4l/100km, when I refill motorbike and see how much I make km it was 4.1l/100km.
 

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I leave my TRIP COMPUTOR ('15 V650) at RANGE, simply because (IMHO) - the MPG figures are NOT correct.
Showing the range can be very misleading as it be set by the consumption that the bike calculates. Sometimes it jumps a lot... You think that you have enough fuel and then... 0 Kms.

When I fuel up I always fill the tank. And I put the partial counter to 0. And I know that I get about 320-350km with a gás tank. I find this the most reliable. I also find the gas indicator very unreliable. And that drives me crazy.

Enviado do meu G3221 através do Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #28
in all the Kawasaki bikes I own, the range is inaccurate, but on a safe side. meaning, when it indicates that none is left, you can still ride at least 50km. same with the fuel indicator. the fuel indicator in V3 is showing one line when plenty of fuel is left...
 

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In 6th gear on level ground at 40mph the instant economy gauge says 80mpg, at 50mph it says 75mpg, at 60mph it says 70mpg, at 70 mph it says 60mpg, at 80mph it says 50mpg. The average gauge says around 59mpg which I believe as most of my time is spent at 75-80. Fuel mileage is a wildly variable function of the riders height, weight, tire type, wind direction, speed, number of stop and go's. If you want to compare you have to remove some variables which is why I expressed it the way I did. I am 6' 1" and 215lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
I think that the only things that are accurate on the display of the dashboard, are speed (if you did not change the gearing), rpm, the number of km covered, (maybe the engine temperature), and time :). if the manufacturer cannot figure out how to indicate precisely the fuel level, most of the other averages will be at most just approximate.
 

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I drive 120km per day commuting, which includes mountain passes, rural area and open road.
Average speed 100km/h, with probably 50% at 120 to 130 km/h.
Have done 13000 km in 6 months on the original tyres with average indicated fuel economy of 25 km/l.
The kicker...
Changed to a set of 50/50 Dunlop Trailmax Mission tyres in sizes 110/80-19 and 150/70-17.
This relates to the front being slightly smaller but 10% wider, with the rear being 0.3% larger in diameter and 15.4% wider.
Right off the bat the bike lost a lot of power, I can no longer just accelerate from 50km/h in 6th gear and have to use a lot more throttle to get going in any gear.
With standard tyres, speedo was overreading by 6km/h at 120km/h, now only 2km/h.
Indicated fuel consumption went down to average of 23.9 km/l.
What boggles my mind is how anybody comes to the conclusion that going to a 15 tooth sprocket would improve anything concerning driveability, power and fuel consumption on this bike!
Just changing the tyre size and tread pattern, dramatically changed the driving characteristics of the VX completely.
Where previously I could basically leave it in top gear, now I have to wring it’s neck and change gears more frequently to get going.
Short of it, leave the bike as is, it works best all round with standard gearing and standard tyre size.
Still think it’s an awesome machine!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I personally do not see much difference with 15T sprocket in terms of driveability, as the bike is geared really low. I would leave it 14T if riding on dirt, but as I use it only for highways, when riding 130km with 15T, the rpm is lower and hence the bike is more relaxed and naturally consumes a bit less fuel.
 

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There are so many factors that go into fuel economy. Aerodynamics, road surface, tires, rider input into throttle and brake, varying engine speeds, stop and go, and so on.

My big Harley Road glide (designed in a wind tunnel) gets 50 mpg riding the same roads that I got 50 mpg with the versys 650.

My aerodynamic Triumph Trophy SE 1250 got 60 mpg on the same roads.

My very non aerodynamic Vulcan Voyager 1700 got 40 mpg.

My Royal Enfield Himalayan, 75 mpg.

Now increase speeds to interstate speeds and they all drop some, because they are working harder in either engine revs or aerodynamic drag. That is except for the Triumph Trophy. That was one amazing motorcycle that I probably shouldn't have parted with.
 

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I think that the only things that are accurate on the display of the dashboard, are speed (if you did not change the gearing), rpm, the number of km covered, (maybe the engine temperature), and time :). if the manufacturer cannot figure out how to indicate precisely the fuel level, most of the other averages will be at most just approximate.
The gearing doesn't effect the speedometer and the fuel consumption isn't based on the amount of fuel in the tank.
 

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I drive 120km per day commuting, which includes mountain passes, rural area and open road.
Average speed 100km/h, with probably 50% at 120 to 130 km/h.
Have done 13000 km in 6 months on the original tyres with average indicated fuel economy of 25 km/l.
The kicker...
Changed to a set of 50/50 Dunlop Trailmax Mission tyres in sizes 110/80-19 and 150/70-17.
This relates to the front being slightly smaller but 10% wider, with the rear being 0.3% larger in diameter and 15.4% wider.
Right off the bat the bike lost a lot of power, I can no longer just accelerate from 50km/h in 6th gear and have to use a lot more throttle to get going in any gear.
With standard tyres, speedo was overreading by 6km/h at 120km/h, now only 2km/h.
Indicated fuel consumption went down to average of 23.9 km/l.
What boggles my mind is how anybody comes to the conclusion that going to a 15 tooth sprocket would improve anything concerning driveability, power and fuel consumption on this bike!
Just changing the tyre size and tread pattern, dramatically changed the driving characteristics of the VX completely.
Where previously I could basically leave it in top gear, now I have to wring it’s neck and change gears more frequently to get going.
Short of it, leave the bike as is, it works best all round with standard gearing and standard tyre size.
Still think it’s an awesome machine!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I would blame this on the tire weight trailmax mission tires are basically the heaviest tires out there. They tend to weigh two to three times as much as a regular tire also you upped the width and what that actually does, when you don't change the wheel as well, is that it forces the tire into inappropriate geometry making it rounder and taller than it actually is supposed to be, it's a very different situation from when you put wider tires on a truck, so your math based on the written size probably doesn't line up with reality because you deformed the tire putting it on a wheel width made for a 130 rear. Just looking over the math on this making some assumptions that the tire you chose doubled the weight of the wheel I believe it's actually about doubling the amount of torque required to spin it... The 300 only has 25Nm max to give my assumption is that from a standstill the bike probably doesn't have sufficient torque to spin that heavy tire, since the trailmax mission was targeted at large adventure bikes like the big GS's and versys 1000's with over 100Nm it would go unnoticed in such an application because they have piles of torque to spare while we don't. Likewise your braking has likely suffered greatly as well correct? Try a lighter tire like the Karoo 3 I had them on my DR650 they are very light, look tough, and perform well. You might consider going back to the original tire size as well or at the worst a 140 variant.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
The gearing doesn't effect the speedometer and the fuel consumption isn't based on the amount of fuel in the tank.
The gearing doesn't effect the speedometer and the fuel consumption isn't based on the amount of fuel in the tank.
Since the speed sensor is at the rear wheel, wouldn't changing the rear sprocket give a false reading on the speedometer?
 

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No it won't. Changing the tire size would though. Changing the sprocket sizes changes the gear ratio which is the ratio of the number of engine turns to the number of tire turns. The speed of the bike is only dependent on the number of tire turns, speaking hypothetically you could pull the engine and transmission roll/ride the bike downhill and still get accurate speed. Another way to see this is that when you pull the clutch in at 70 mph and let your rpm go to 1000 does your speed go to zero? No, because the wheel is still spinning relative to the road. In a way you are "modifying the tachometer" output when changing gearing not the speedometer. It's all relative.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
That's good to know. Some bikes have the speed sensor connected to transmission gear though...
 

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That's good to know. Some bikes have the speed sensor connected to transmission gear though...
Never owned one, maybe Harley's and the like? Most of my bikes and my friends bikes it's been on the front axle. Makes sense Kawasaki is using the ABS ring if it's already there kind of makes me wonder why they don't do that with cars as well.
 
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