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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I am going to start this by saying I have read several threads about how much of a pain the front sprocket nut can be to remove and some of the tricks to do it. I have tried all of them and I am still fighting this thing. I dont really want to take any heat to it because I know there is a seal behind the sprocket. Has anyone used any penetrating oil like PB Blaster to help? I know some penetrating oils can damaged rubber seals, so I want to avoid doing more damage.

The second question might be a dumb one. When the bike is on the stand and I pull the clutch it, click the bike into first gear, the rear wheel will start spinning slowly, even with the clutch pulled in. Is that a sign that the previous owner adjusted the clutch cable wrong? I come from more the automotive world and road course racing, the last car we ran had a sequential transmission and it would do the same thing, but that car never really had to sit at lights building heat in the clutch.
 

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The front sprocket is painful, I remember my efforts. First thing on that is to (as others have stated here before) make sure the lock washer has been straightened as much as you can before starting to attempt loosening the nut. Then, the only way mine would come off was with a very stout pneumatic impact gun from a local repair shop. I rode down, had them loosen the nut and then just tightened it up by hand (with a 1/2" breaker bar) to get myself a mile back to my place. I hope that helps.

As for the tire spinning with the bike in gear with the clutch lever pulled in, this is completely normal behavior for a wet clutch motorcycle. Because the clutch plates are bathed in oil, there is some drag on the plates even with the clutch pulled in, nothing to worry about here. Just make sure the clutch is adjusted per the service manual and you'll be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Lightning!
I was actually considering doing the same thing. There is a mechanic at the end of my road that treats me pretty good, he just works odd hours. I tried my electric impact and it was a no go, same with the breaker bar. It has been frustrating.

I checked the clutch when I started doing all of the maintenance and it seemed good, but like I said, im new to this stuff so I figured it was better to be sure.
 

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Look at this thread, specifically post#5. There may be more information in the 77 posts as well. The 'socket' method worked perfectly for me.

 

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So, I am going to start this by saying I have read several threads about how much of a pain the front sprocket nut can be to remove and some of the tricks to do it...
take the drama out of the whole deal, get an inexpensive Sprocket Stuff removal tool. google it, watch the youtube. i've been using this tool for years and have made the same recommendation numerous times on this forum.

i've seen these ptwin motors delivered from the factory that took as little as 50# and as much as 400# of torque to break the nut free for the first sprocket change. there is no standard, so if your bike happens to be one that takes 3-400#, you better be very confident in your methodology or you risk damaging the bike or injuring yourself.

then there's the 1 1/16" 6pt deep reach heavy wall impact socket, don't forget it. the torque required for the nut removal can split a regular thin wall socket, and when that happens, you might need stitches.
 

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So, I am going to start this by saying I have read several threads about how much of a pain the front sprocket nut can be to remove and some of the tricks to do it. I have tried all of them and I am still fighting this thing. I dont really want to take any heat to it because I know there is a seal behind the sprocket. Has anyone used any penetrating oil like PB Blaster to help? I know some penetrating oils can damaged rubber seals, so I want to avoid doing more damage.
Don't know what tools you're using but when I did my first chain job, I purchased an electric impact wrench that was recommended in the forum. After activating it on the nut about 3 times, it finally loosened and I was able to get it off and proceed with the chain swap. Here's where I got it:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07255QCN4/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


The second question might be a dumb one. When the bike is on the stand and I pull the clutch it, click the bike into first gear, the rear wheel will start spinning slowly, even with the clutch pulled in. Is that a sign that the previous owner adjusted the clutch cable wrong? I come from more the automotive world and road course racing, the last car we ran had a sequential transmission and it would do the same thing, but that car never really had to sit at lights building heat in the clutch.
Don't think this is anything to worry about. Every bike I've owned with a wet clutch did this.
 

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Don't know what tools you're using but when I did my first chain job, I purchased an electric impact wrench that was recommended in the forum. After activating it on the nut about 3 times, it finally loosened and I was able to get it off and proceed with the chain swap. Here's where I got it:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07255QCN4/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Ditto on the electric impact wrench. I got the same one.

As a bonus, I swap snow tires on/off both of our cars. The impact wrench makes removing the lug bolts/nuts really easy.
 

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2017 Kawasaki Versys-x 300; 14/46 sprockets (stock);
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take the drama out of the whole deal, get an inexpensive Sprocket Stuff removal tool. google it, watch the youtube. i've been using this tool for years and have made the same recommendation numerous times on this forum.

i've seen these ptwin motors delivered from the factory that took as little as 50# and as much as 400# of torque to break the nut free for the first sprocket change. there is no standard, so if your bike happens to be one that takes 3-400#, you better be very confident in your methodology or you risk damaging the bike or injuring yourself.

then there's the 1 1/16" 6pt deep reach heavy wall impact socket, don't forget it. the torque required for the nut removal can split a regular thin wall socket, and when that happens, you might need stitches.
Wow. Sometimes simple (but specialized) tools are the answer.

Sprocket Stuff removal tool ... ingenious ! I didn't have trouble on my front sprocket ... but this would have made the process a little easier. It's on my wish list now.
 

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I have removed SOME sprockets w/ NO problem, but others W/ PROBLEMS!

IF you're using an air-impact wrench I suggest you try RIGHT AFTER it has re-filled itself, rather than being down a few ft/lbs of pressure!

I've ALSO used a shop 'down-the-road' to loosen it, then gently tightened it and rode home to 'finish' the job.
 

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While chain is on, put in neutral, hockey stick through the wheel on the swing arm resting,
Electric impact wrench, an impact rated socket you'll be using,
Regular thread - counter clockwise to losen.
Ear plugs recommended... you might have to hold more than a second....

Put it back with hocket stick under the swing arm,
No impact wrench, breaker bar works like a charm.
No recommendation from me on anti seize.
NEVER forget to fold the washer over the nut, please!
 

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2021 Versys 650 LT
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On my Ninja 300 I had to block the rear wheel, then use a regular socket and breaker bar while lightly hitting the back of the socket/bar with a hammer while attempting to loosen. This worked even when my impact gun would not.

Sent from my SM-T380 using Tapatalk
 

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Vx300 Don’t fear the Revs!
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To hold the rear wheel while breaking the sprocket nut, I put a metal wrecking bar thru the rear sprocket and braced against the swing arm. I didn’t want to subject my spokes to that kind of load. Plus, it gets more of the impact on the nut than compressing wood offers.
 

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To hold the rear wheel while breaking the sprocket nut, I put a metal wrecking bar thru the rear sprocket and braced against the swing arm. I didn’t want to subject my spokes to that kind of load. Plus, it gets more of the impact on the nut than compressing wood offers.
I usually remove it with only my hand holding the wheel.
It's not hitting hard after all the mechanical advantage.
The wood stick (protecting the wheel) is just for freeing one's hand.

It's the impact that matters; inertia is enough resistance.
The unfortunate timing is that I must break the nut before changing the chain, which is usually loose and flapping.
That's what removes the sharpness of the blows.
If I really needed that much more sharpness, I would just hold the chain slack by cinching the bottom chain on the swingarm,
keeping the top tight between blows.


With a breaker bar, that's a whole different story! I broke many sticks trying to hold the wheel back then. I ended up duct taping a 1/2in rod.
 

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Vx300 Don’t fear the Revs!
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I used an old school impact: baby sledge on wrench. Similar technique but with a torque wrench to tighten. Don’t have the value in front of me, but it took significant umph!
 

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The gen 2 manual shows 92 ftlb lubed torque. Not sure on the other generations.

Be careful if you use a solid bar in the wheel to contact the swing arm. There is at least one member who damaged the swing arm by denting it with a steel rod. The swing arm is hollow and not very thick material.
 

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what? My 2015 service manual says
Torque - Engine Sprocket Nut: 165 N·m (16.8 kgf·m, 122 ft·lb)
Are you saying the gen1 gen2 are so much lower?
I have a "pen-and-ink" correction in my SERVICE MANUAL for the 2015 V650: torque (WET) to 93'/#, which is in 'line' w/ the early Gens which show 92'/# (WET). [WET = lubricated]

OF COURSE (tongue-in-cheek) you could follow the factory setting by using a 3/4" drive 3 foot long 'breaker-bar', then stand on it and JUMP, IF you're less than 225 pounds.... ;)
 

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I have a "pen-and-ink" correction in my SERVICE MANUAL for the 2015 V650: torque (WET) to 93'/#, which is in 'line' w/ the early Gens which show 92'/# (WET). [WET = lubricated]
We had a discussion here about those torque values a while back, and as I recall the conclusion was the 2015 manual was in error. I put the same correction into my manual.
 
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