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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a new 650, and it is front diving too much. There is the spring preload and damping adjustments in the front. What have you found as the best setting?
 

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This is how I adjust my front and rear suspension.


Weight limit of Versys 650 2018 model is 210 kg. (In manual: Weight of rider, passenger, baggage, and accessories must not exceed 210 kg - 463lb) I have 105 kg + all gear on me and on motorbike is about 130 kg.
Rebound I set on 1.5-2 full turn (I can always adjust that in ride depend what kind or road are, bad or good.). For spring action I use 1 full turn is 10 kg. I make 13 turns. For rear sprocket I use same way, every click is 8.75 kg, I use 16 clicks.
Feeling on motorbike are much better than stock settings.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is how I adjust my front and rear suspension.


Weight limit of Versys 650 2018 model is 210 kg. (In manual: Weight of rider, passenger, baggage, and accessories must not exceed 210 kg - 463lb) I have 105 kg + all gear on me and on motorbike is about 130 kg.
Rebound I set on 1.5-2 full turn (I can always adjust that in ride depend what kind or road are, bad or good.). For spring action I use 1 full turn is 10 kg. I make 13 turns. For rear sprocket I use same way, every click is 8.75 kg, I use 16 clicks.
Felling on motorbike are much better than stock settings.
this guy is not right. the rear setting is for rebound spring preload, not for compression.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
and that guy does not know what he is talking about. I lived in India for many years, and he is just ignorant. the front suspension is just too soft; only a harder spring rate can remedy it. higher compression on the left leg spring preload does not help much, and damping on the left leg serves an entirely different purpose...
 

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I just got a new 650, and it is front diving too much. There is the spring preload and damping adjustments in the front. What have you found as the best setting?
This is a ~6" suspension. If you come from a sport or touring bike with ~4-5", it's normal that you feel it's diving.
You'll get used to it, rest assured.

You can't change that diving unless you change the springs (and you shouldn't unless you want to defeat the benefit of a longer suspension). These spring are fine and they are hard to bottom out.

Braking is a slow move and the bike doesn't have compression damping adjustment. Even if it had, it would not help unless it is way too hard for the normal riding.

Preload only changes the static height; it will still dive as much but you end a bit higher. The risk is to put too much preload and then forks top out and the wheel goes airborne over dips in road, dangerously losing traction in turns...

Your choices are to accept it, sell it, or change springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
sorry, there is no higher compression on the left leg, only higher spring preload
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This is a ~6" suspension. If you come from a sport or touring bike with ~4-5", it's normal that you feel it's diving.
You'll get used to it, rest assured.

You can't change that diving unless you change the springs (and you shouldn't unless you want to defeat the benefit of a longer suspension). These spring are fine and they are hard to bottom out.

Braking is a slow move and the bike doesn't have compression damping adjustment. Even if it had, it would not help unless it is way too hard for the normal riding.

Preload only changes the static height; it will still dive as much but you end a bit higher. The risk is to put too much preload and then forks top out and the wheel goes airborne over dips in road, dangerously loosing traction in turns...

Your choices are to accept it, sell it, or change springs.
thanks! I think I will live with the front softer springs; just braking more gently. I spent so much money on my Versys 1000 to upgrade the springs, and I am not sure if am going to invest so much in the 650. maybe in the future. the fact is that it is front-diving too much!!! I know that spring preload will not change it
 

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Discussion Starter #9
well, excessive front-diving is true right now. may I ask if your experience is different?
 

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well, excessive front-diving is true right now. may I ask if your experience is different?
I was shocked, going from a ninja 650 to the versys 650, out of the dealer's parking lot. Then the smoothness of the ride took over real fast and I loved it within a few weeks, maybe even days (that was 4 years ago, can't recall too well). I recon it still dives today, but that's all predictable now.

The bike is not wrongly calibrated. Imagine the dive on a 12" suspension dirt bike... Gotta get used to it. That's all I meant.
But I'm seeing the v1000 has also ~6" from suspension so I suspect your spring work made it stiffer than v650 and that throws you off.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I still have the original springs for versys 1000, but I doubt that they will fit the 650?
 

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and that guy does not know what he is talking about. I lived in India for many years, and he is just ignorant. the front suspension is just too soft; only a harder spring rate can remedy it. higher compression on the left leg spring preload does not help much, and damping on the left leg serves an entirely different purpose...
I use that way to adjust front and rear suspension by using my kilograms and equipment which I bring with me.
It work perfectly for me.
 

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I just got a new 650, and it is front diving too much. There is the spring preload and damping adjustments in the front. What have you found as the best setting?
Getting the proper spring rate for your weight would be the first step, then you can also 'fine tune' your damping with higher or lower viscosity fork oil. Lighter oil will flow freer and heavier oil will be progressively more restrictive as you go up in viscosity. This is a common adjustment for bikes with no external compression adjustment.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
so irrespectively of my weight, do you guys feel that the front fork is diving too much?
 

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I'm 175# 'wet', so probably 200# 'ready-to-ride'. I have my '15 V650 forks set at: SPRING = 2.75 turns from 'softest'; and DAMPING = 2 turns from 'softest'. The shock at 4 clicks from softest.
 

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I just got a new 650, and it is front diving too much. There is the spring preload and damping adjustments in the front. What have you found as the best setting?
You haven't mentioned your weight. Also, how was the bike set up when you bought it? I presume it was the stock settings at front and rear - Front preload 6.5 IN, front damping 2.5 out, Rear 1 click IN.

Personally, I found both the front and rear too hard; must have been as I was coming off of a BMW 310 GS (lovely suspension, crappy fuelling and gearbox). But over the past 9 months and 5000 kms, I settled down with the front. It was ok for my riding pattern with a 80/20 mix of good highway and broken tarmac/dirt road. The front hit the stops only twice and those instances were actually cause for concern w/regard to a bent rim (sharp, deep potholes).

I think that you should use the bike a bit over varying types of terrain and you'll realise that the front actually doesn't dive as much as you think it does. Of course, no comparison with a dirt bike here.

The rear still bothers me a bit. I tested 16 clicks IN with 15/15 kgs ballast on either side and the result was excellent. But then, the damper heated up like crazy so I went down to 10 kgs and then 7 kgs and then zero. After all this testing, I have realised that (a) I'll need to find a way to install 7 + 7 kgs of ballast such that it tucks in below the rear frame and allows me the use of the soft pannier bags OR (b) change the oil to a thinner one OR (b) the spring to a softer one OR (c) replace the whole damper with the famous 2007-2008 Yamaha R1 stock fitment. This is in increasing order of cost.

I haven't mentioned the last option - increase my own weight by about 25 kgs - because that is the unhealthiest one:D
 

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Discussion Starter #17
ok, I am not slim. my weight is 95kg. but I don't think that this should matter with front diving. the brakes are pretty good on 650, so if you press the brake lever, you will front dive even if you are 80kg. the rear shock is very average, but adequate; it put it on the lowest settings so I can sit lower; it is bouncing a bit too much on my taste, but that is the damping issue.

as to the front, I just adjusted the damping one click from fully in; but anyway, this does not affect the compression, I think. I increased the spring preload quite a bit, but again, this does not affect the front diving. A stronger front spring is required.

I had the same issues with Versys 1000, so I changed the front to Axxiom cartridges. Now the bike is perfect, but I don't want to spend this amount of money on 650. Someone suggested here a higher viscosity fork fluid, but does it affect the compression or only the damping?
 

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higher viscosity fork fluid, but does it affect the compression or only the damping?
both damping are affected because it resists flowing in either direction.

I never tried to adjust the rebound damping other than ensuring it is about the same as the fixed compression one; I don`t want the forks to extend nor sink when rolling on washboards offroad (btw you know a suspension is cheap when it provides only one damping..).
 

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so irrespectively of my weight, do you guys feel that the front fork is diving too much?
No. It took me a while to get used to having a suspension with travel and compliance. Now I wonder how anybody can ride the rigid bikes...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
rigid is one thing, but if your brake and you feel like the bike is going to touch with his nose the ground, is another thing
 
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