Kawasaki Versys Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Man, I am going to have to mount some highway pegs for this bike. I admit it, I'm getting old. After 100 miles, I need to stretch my legs out for a change up.

I guess the best solution I have seen so far through this forum, is to mount some crash bars and attach to them. I hate to get the crash bars, as I have never needed them on any bike before.

Short of doing some welding though, I am fresh out of ideas for coming up with a neat way to do the mount.

Anybody want to weigh in on something I missed? Thanks for any input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Foot pegs

I installed a set of $20. foot pegs on my crash bars, purchased from Ebay. they really help giving me another place to rest my feet.

Cb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You know, I looked at that mounting point, but wondered how I would get a nut behind that standoff. Is that how you secured the pegs. This is the same pegs I used on the FJR but had to attach some aluminum plate to help secure the pegs.
You can kind of see it in the pic attached. Looks the same but could you elaborate on how you mounted it. Also, I am guessing you have not had and problem with the bending from weight of you leg?
Thanks for the reply too.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
How to do it!

Well I will do my best to explain.

The bracket on the left that is used to attach the lower fairing is not strong enough to support any weight so I made a new stronger one.

The lower fairing on the right side of the bike is attached to a plate that goes over the water pump cover.

Both sides normally are attached using a bolt that screws into a threaded nut welded onto the appropriate plate. This won’t work for attaching foot pegs as they require a stud with an American thread so…

I welded a stud onto the left side bracket that I made. For the right side I removed the water pump outer bracket, drilled the nut out and welded on a stud. Note: you can do this normally without any fluid leakage.

Now, we aren’t finished yet. One more thing to do as we are attaching 2 components to the same stud. We must have a method of making the lower fairing secure without applying too much pressure on it so as not to deform the plastic and at the same time we must be able to secure the foot pegs with a lot more torque so they will not spin or vibrate lose. In order to allow this I turned a spacer on the lathe with a shoulder on it. The width of the shoulder corresponds to just several thousands less than the thickness of the plastic fairing lowers.

To assemble: Insert spacer into fairing lower and place onto bike. Screw a nut onto the stud and tighten. It can’t over tighten because of the shoulder. This holds the fairing. Next screw a second nut all the onto the stud until it just touches the first nut and then back it off just a hair so it is not tight. Now screw the foot peg onto the stud and after you have it aligned the way you want it back that second nut off so that it locks the foot peg into the desired position.

Woo, I hope I have explained it well enough so that you get the picture.

By the way, I should warn you that the left and right lower fairing attachment points are not exactly in the same place on both sides. They are about an inch off but if you were to ride my bike without me informing you of this you would never know it.

Good luck if you decide to proceed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Oh, forgot to answer your last question. No bending. I haven't actually stood on one peg with all my weight but I have stood up on both of them. In reality, only a portion of the weight of your legs rest on these pegs in normal usage, so they are strong enough for that. They can also help provide protection in case the bike is dropped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I made some out of PVC pipe and a wooden dowel:


P1060906 by mattdan12, on Flickr

Hardest part was finding a bolt to hold it all together, eventually went to a specialty metric bolt store in Denver that had what I needed. They told me the bolts were strong enough to hold my weight, but I know the mounting points probably aren't.

After adding some friction tape to the PVC pipe, this set up worked perfectly for my 2300 mile round trip from Colorado to Wisconsin.

As Pegasus mentioned, the left plate isn't strong enough to hold a lot of weight, so a new one would be in order if you wanted to make this permanent.

Keep in mind these are rigid mounts, so they could cause a problem if you ever leaned far enough to scrape one, but I've never scrapped the normal pegs, so I wasn't too worried about it.

I may try to find better material to build them out of, but I'll only install them for long trips anyway. I can go back to stock in about 60 seconds with these.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top