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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
* first I'd like to apologize for any kinds of English mistakes I'm might do. English is not my mother tongue :)

In few weeks I'm about to have my new V 08' but lately I've started to be worried a bit regarding my riding experience... sine I only had 3 month adventure with my XR 250 during quick trip around Ireland, and only 3 years on small scooters I've started to think I might need to take advanced riding course before I get the new bike.

on the other hand, I heard that Versys is very easy with beginners in terms of 'road behavior'. what do you think ?
 

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Check all parts. Brakes work, how does the levers feel, they are adjustable. Make sure the rear brake is adjusted so you can easily apply brake. Make sure the brake light comes on when either front or rear brake is activated. Check air pressure. I know dealer is supposed to do this but I always like to be sure.

My rear suspension was set to #5 preload, should have been #2 (way to stiff). After lots of testing my front preload is now completely backed off.

This bike is pretty easy to take off on, don't push it and get used to it slowly and take in the ride, fun bike for sure!
 

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I was in almost the same situation as yourself... I had only been on the road with a bike for a little over a year when I bought my V. My previous bike was a 400cc so it was a bit smaller. I was worried that the V may have been too big or too powerful a bike for me to jump onto for only have been riding a year. But, I'm glad I made the choice I have. The V is very easy to handle, even for a noobie, yet powerful enough to more than satisfy you once you have a feel for it down. Just take it easy until you feel comfortable. You'll be suprised by how much power it delivers when you first hop on, and if you're like me and accidently pull a wheelie you'll quickly learn how to respect that power. So... all in all, I'd say you can do it, it's possible to quickly learn to handle yourelf on a V. I know first hand.
But... if you do feel like taking Motorcycle Courses then please do so. I have not yet myself, but do plan on doing so soon. I've heard from people who have been riding even longer than I've been around that you never know enough to not benefit from such a course.
 

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don't sweat it

I wouldn't worry about it at all. The versys has great road manners, the only thing to worry about is judging your braking and acceleration points. It has alot more get-up-and-go than a scooter and/or xr, but it also has alot better brakes... imo; :thumb:As with any new bike, it'll take some mileage before you have a feel for it's capabilities.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Guys, these are indeed relieving comments from you.. I was a bit afraid the V is much too aggressive bike for beginner like me... did you know that in Israel the new model cost ~17K $ ?!?!?! taxes here are unbelievably high - still, cant wait for the red guy to come :)
 

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I think that you will greatly enjoy your new ride. Your situation sounds similar to mine just a few short weeks ago. In my case, I had not been on a bike in 30 years, but had recently taken the MSF basic rider course. That course taught me the basics of motorcycling on a little 250 (Nighthawk in my case). I was quite concerned about riding my Versys home the day I bought it, and I imagine that I was pretty wide-eyed as I departed for the 50 mile trip from where I purchased the bike to home. In the end I got comfortable on the bike quite quickly. While the Nighthawk was tolerant of my flippant clutch releases, it took me about two minutes to realize that the Versys had enough power to get the front wheel in the air if I did that. After I learned to pay a little bit of attention to the clutch, the ride home went fine.

Just yesterday I did the same ride back to the dealership for the bike's 600 mile service. I already miss it.
 

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And remember ! When you're on your Bike, your a "Rider" not a Driver :D

Take it easy, get comfortable on your bike before doing anything extreme...Safety Safety Safety!

Respect the bike for it's power ( The V does have a good amount of power )

Learn what the bikes handling capacities are. In other words, learn to predict what both you and the bike can and cannot do, and what the limits are.

The difference between a 250 and a 650 is substantial enough to perhaps consider taking a refresh riders course or advanced riders course if you feel too nervous

On the other hand, your not really a "begginer" and i think the Versys is a awesome bike in respect to handling and power distribution. You'll be fine :)
 

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For a beginner the V is very well behaved indeed, respect it, but don't be scared of it.

My riding experience before my V was made up of fun rides on buddies bikes for short distances, after this weekend my V now has just under 500km on it (will post some piccies on other thread later), we took it up and down mountain passes this weekend with some serious twisties, and even though I will rate myself as a newbie for a long time still, handling the V was a pleasure.

One thing to note though, when you "cold start" your V, let it idle warm until you hear the revs drop off, for a new rider it can be a bit like a bull ride if you just take off immediately, the higher idle and you also revving not to stall the bike makes for a VERY speedy take-off ;) You get used to it very quickly though, but beware the first 2 or 3 days.

The V.... is awesome.
 

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Hi all,
* first I'd like to apologize for any kinds of English mistakes I'm might do. English is not my mother tongue :)

In few weeks I'm about to have my new V 08' but lately I've started to be worried a bit regarding my riding experience... sine I only had 3 month adventure with my XR 250 during quick trip around Ireland, and only 3 years on small scooters I've started to think I might need to take advanced riding course before I get the new bike.

on the other hand, I heard that Versys is very easy with beginners in terms of 'road behavior'. what do you think ?
I was also come from XR250 Motard(3months only). The major difference being the weight, esp. when the fuel tank is full! Take notes on how does the center of gravity different from XR250.

I believe the engine is gentle enough for you to go smoothly. Keep acceleration and braking as smooth as possible and you will do fine with this wonderful creation!

p.s. now my XR250 seems to be as light as a mountain bike...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
lokto7 - can you please elaborate a bit regarding the center gravity comment of yours. how does it really effect your riding comparing to the XR ?
 

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You'll love the bike. Take your time when you're getting ready to ride - like versys_guy said - check the bike over every time you ride. If you drop it, take your helmet off and take a few minutes to gather your thoughts and calm down - look over the bike again to make sure everything is in order. Check your tire pressure every time you ride! If anything doesn't look/sound/feel right, don't ignore it - get a second opinion or help from your dealer.

When you're beginning riding the bike, take your time getting to know the motor. Take it easy, as others have said, the motor has a good bit of power. As you get more familiar with how the bike handles and how comfortable you are with cornering, braking, or acceleration, learn to incrementally advance your skills in those areas while still riding within your level of comfort. In other words, if you ride one day and give the bike 1/4 throttle to get going down the road, don't go out the next day and give it 100% throttle.

Good luck!
 

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Lior K,

One of the most important things, if not THE most important to know about riding any motorcycle on the roads is this: "ALWAYS LOOK WHERE YOU WANT THE BIKE TO GO".

When going around a turn, you want to train your eyes to spot your entry point and then look to the exit point.

If you let your eyes stay stuck on a corner entrance too long, you will freak yourself out and think youre going too fast and possibly crash.

I saw this happen to an inexperienced rider just this past weekend. She didnt know how to use her eyes properly.

There are tons of books out there that cover proper riding techniques. One of the best I have read is "Sport Riding Techniques" by a guy named Nick Ienatsch. Ive also taken the Motorcycle Safety Foundation rider safety course many years ago. They teach this rule as well.

But to me , "look where you want to go" is the most important rule to know when riding a motorcycle, especially one as fun to go fast on as the Versys.

Good luck to you and happy riding! :cheers:


(By the way, are there many fun, twisty roads in Tel Aviv?)
 

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lokto7 - can you please elaborate a bit regarding the center gravity comment of yours. how does it really effect your riding comparing to the XR ?
Comparing to XR250 Motard, the COG of Versys is higher and a bit more away from the rider.

COG combining the weight (181kg + 19L fuel vs 130kg + 9L fuel)...

1. You will find that it's relatively more difficult to do cornering in motard style (but still can do).

2. Take special care whenever you stop the Versys. Take it easy and steadily.

I'm not saying Versys is of poor handle. In fact, Versys is very easy to handle, even for me newbie in motorcycling. Just need to take extra care when you switch from a smaller bike. :thumb:
 
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