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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I purchased the 2015 Versys 650 with 27,000 miles. This is my first motorcycle. No motorcycle experience at all except my endorsement acquired two months ago. I need your help with regular maintenance or any advice for beginners, please.

Previous owner was very kind, and he provided a list of items to take care of:
  • Engine oil: after 2000 mile from now
  • Tires: the front is brand new, while the rear one has about 1200 miles (Q: how many miles a tire can go on average?)
  • Chain: checked recently and OK (please see attached pics)
  • Sprocket: checked recently and OK

Question 1: Is there any other maintenance part I should take care of?
Question 2: The chain looks not very clean to me (IMG_8864.JPG). But I have no equipment and cleaner yet. Also, the chain area is heavily coated with oil residue. Should I go to a car wash place and pressure wash as much as I can before chain cleaning?
Question 3: I have already fallen off my bike three times while practicing. After I lift the bike up, I saw green liquid falling out of the black rubber hose (IMG_8865.JPG). Should I be concerned about it?
Question 4: how do you keep track of maintenance? Is there a better way to do it?
Question 5:I want to buy a swing arm stand. I found one on Amazon but one review said that spool size isn't working for Verysys. Any recommendations for the stand?

Thank you for reading and providing any advice!

DY
 

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Don't take a power wash to any bike ever.
I use a spreadsheet to keep track of things.
I believe the 2015 and later use 8mm thread swing arm spools, older Versys used 10mm.

BTW welcome from SW Ontario Canada.
Keep on practicing and each time you fall off analyze why, then it becomes a learning experience. Maybe watch some videos on low speed handling, that's where most of those occur.
 

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2013 Versys 650
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Maybe watch some videos on low speed handling, ...
MotoJitsu. I watch 250 hours of education on yt before buying a bike. Out of all the people, "Fast Eddie" is concise, and straight forward. explains things well. I'd highly recommend it. I'm in a similar boat, have around 350 miles, so I'm new too. Haven't fallen yet(knock on wood). Fully expect to, but it was very useful info in his videos.

But he might not be right for you, there are so many out there to watch. Learn from everyone and see what works best for you.
 

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Congrats! You have a new and very rewarding hobby. Learning your bike, and learning how to ride it. Take your time. Learn as much as you can. Try not to hurt yourself, or your bike. Pavement is not the least bit forgiving.
Much can be learned searching around the forum here, from your manual, and utube is a great resource for maintenance and developing riding skills.
About the green fluid, I’m pretty sure you just found the coolant overflow tube. Some coolant likely found its way into the overflow tube when the bike was on its side. It just drained out after uprighting the bike. No worries. Good time to learn how to ck your coolant level 👍
 

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My best advice is: don’t expect to be seen. In fact, assume: no one sees you, everyone is going to cut you off, pull out in front of you, and otherwise try to kill you. You have a new superpower of invisibility.
I always try to leave myself an out. Such as leaving room to maneuver around the vehicle in front of you at stop lights. If the guy behind you is busy texting. And sniffing tailpipes is no fun anyway. But all the time is a good habit. If you’re committed on a line and things go south, you’ll want a plan b.

Invisibility training:
 

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Where are you from? (that might help me understand the surface rust in the last picture). With a location, there may be someone on here that is close by that could be a riding buddy, etc.

For the rear tire, you should expect a minimum of 5,000 miles. Just keep an eye one it occasionally.

Clutch cable should be checked for fraying and lubed occasionally. You can find how-tos on here.

Black tube is the drain for the overflow tank. If the bike goes down, it is possible that some coolant from the overflow would end up in the tube, and drip out when you lift the bike up. I would not worry about it.

You should also check that coolant overflow bottle occasionally.
 

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I would take those saddle bags off while you are learning to ride. They break pretty easily and are very expensive to replace.

My best advice is: don’t expect to be seen. In fact, assume: no one sees you, everyone is going to cut you off, pull out in front of you, and otherwise try to kill you. You have a new superpower of invisibility.
I always try to leave myself an out. Such as leaving room to maneuver around the vehicle in front of you at stop lights. If the guy behind you is busy texting. And sniffing tailpipes is no fun anyway. But all the time is a good habit. If you’re committed on a line and things go south, you’ll want a plan b.
This is some excellent advice. People aren't in the habit of looking for motorcycles while driving and will completely miss seeing you regularly. Be prepared for it.
 

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2021 Versys-X 300 2021 Z900RS
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The most Important thing while riding a motorcycle is "Sight Distance", how far you can see in any direction.

MORE IMPORTANTER is BEING SEEN!

Read David Hough's books, Proficient Motorcycling and More Proficient Motorcycling.

Practice, Practice, Practice

HAVE FUN

Congratulations!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
My best advice is: don’t expect to be seen. In fact, assume: no one sees you, everyone is going to cut you off, pull out in front of you, and otherwise try to kill you. You have a new superpower of invisibility.
I always try to leave myself an out. Such as leaving room to maneuver around the vehicle in front of you at stop lights. If the guy behind you is busy texting. And sniffing tailpipes is no fun anyway. But all the time is a good habit. If you’re committed on a line and things go south, you’ll want a plan b.

Invisibility training:
Great video, Thanks!
 

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WELCOME aboard!

Hi everyone,

I purchased the 2015 Versys 650 with 27,000 miles. This is my first motorcycle. No motorcycle experience at all except my endorsement acquired two months ago. I need your help with regular maintenance or any advice for beginners, please.

Previous owner was very kind, and he provided a list of items to take care of:
  • Engine oil: after 2000 mile from now
  • Tires: the front is brand new, while the rear one has about 1200 miles (Q: how many miles a tire can go on average?)
  • Chain: checked recently and OK (please see attached pics)
  • Sprocket: checked recently and OK

Question 1: Is there any other maintenance part I should take care of?
Question 2: The chain looks not very clean to me (IMG_8864.JPG). But I have no equipment and cleaner yet. Also, the chain area is heavily coated with oil residue. Should I go to a car wash place and pressure wash as much as I can before chain cleaning?
Question 3: I have already fallen off my bike three times while practicing. After I lift the bike up, I saw green liquid falling out of the black rubber hose (IMG_8865.JPG). Should I be concerned about it?
Question 4: how do you keep track of maintenance? Is there a better way to do it?
Question 5:I want to buy a swing arm stand. I found one on Amazon but one review said that spool size isn't working for Verysys. Any recommendations for the stand?

Thank you for reading and providing any advice!

DY
MY answers to your questions:
1. look through your OWNERS MANUAL for an idea of what to check & when;
2. use something like kerosene, diesel, WD40 to spray on your chain as a cleaner, then wipe it and the dirt off (I paint one chain-link w/ nail polish so that I can repeat to that spot);
DSC01421 copy 2 by Ed Copeman, on Flickr
3. antifreeze as others have said;
4. I change oil & filter each 5K miles, so IF the 'thousands is divisible by 5' (ie - 30,000/5000 = 6) I change;
5. before I got the right 'spools' I just used two bolts threaded into the holes, leaving an inch outside that my paddock stand could use, until I got the right ones.

Good luck...!

:cool:
 

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I echo the comments about YouTube. There is a huge amount of quality material, including from qualified instructors. I started riding almost a year ago, on a 125. While preparing for my test, I watched as many videos as I could find. Of course that doesn't substitute practice, but does compliment practice. Regarding falling during practice, slow maneuvers requires good clutch control, keeping the clutch in the friction zone throughout. Master this in a straight(ish) line first. One of tips I find most useful, which doesn't seem to get much attention is gripping the tank with your knees. This makes you more one with the bike, giving more control.
 

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2019 Kawasaki Versys 650 LT
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I echo the comments about YouTube. There is a huge amount of quality material, including from qualified instructors. I started riding almost a year ago, on a 125. While preparing for my test, I watched as many videos as I could find. Of course that doesn't substitute practice, but does compliment practice. Regarding falling during practice, slow maneuvers requires good clutch control, keeping the clutch in the friction zone throughout. Master this in a straight(ish) line first. One of tips I find most useful, which doesn't seem to get much attention is gripping the tank with your knees. This makes you more one with the bike, giving more control.
Welcome to the world of motorcycling. Sounds like you've got a good start with your mind set. People are more fortunate now days to have testing and instruction from all over the world, in my beginning you just learned by trial and error, a lot of error but it's a good teacher if you can survive the lessons. Horse back riding teaches you leg uses, followed by dirt bikes and over to street bikes. Through practice you'll learn muscle memory and experience, things will become habit and you don't have to think it, it just happens. The idiots in cars never changes, watch them like a hawk. Ride safe, ride often.
 
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