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Hi All,

I am planing to go on a long distance trip. What are some tools take I should take? Any suggestions would be great.

Thanks 👍☺
 

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That really depends on your abilities and willingness to do roadside repairs.

At a minimum I would say you need tools to be able to adjust the chain.

Tire repair kit, chain lube, zip ties, duct tape,

I recommend performing all the maintenance you can prior to leaving on the trip so you don't have to do while on the trip.

Lube cables, adjust, clean and lube chain, maintain air cleaner, replace tires if you feel they possibly won't last the length of the trip, change oil, etc.
 

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This is among my favorite reoccurring thread topics.

I keep eyeing this kit highly promoted over at ADVRider, but it's not cheap, and not ideal for everyday wrenching. It looks great for a small compact kit to take on the road though. It also would probably serve as a solid upgrade replacement for the barely adequate OEM factory toolkit.

Tiny Toolkit Review: RRR Solutions for Travel ADV Rider
 

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a Tiny Toolkit would never make my list, not even close.

if you turn a wrench on your Versys in any significant way, then the tools you need on the road are the same tools you used at home. it's a pretty simple bike, so the tool list is not a long one, and does pack for travel.
 

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A while back, one of my friends was talking about making a portable tool kit (albeit for taking to track days, not on a road trip). The thing that stuck out to me was: whenever you work on your bike (at home, in your garage) use only your portable tool kit. You’ll quickly find out what you need for regular bike maintenance.
Need a 12mm deep socket? Add it to the kit.
Need needle nose pliers? Add it to the kit.
 

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The maintenance and tires suggestion should not be ignored. This is the main thing! Also, the common thought is to only use your bike toolkit when doing maintenance... and you will quickly learn what you need and don't need to take with. The OEM kit will work in a pinch but it's pretty easy to do better.

After that... the V has a surprising amount of storage for tools and gear. Places like the left side cowling and the side covers can hold items. Here's a thread that has some great suggestions:
 

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Here's a photo; I know I posted it elsewhere but couldn't find it. This is from a year or so ago so it has changed since, but this is what is in my main toolbag. Not pictured are my tire pump and patch tools, jumper cables, med kit, VU meter, and a few other odds and ends that stay on the bike. I also keep a length of fuel tubing and a quick-disconnect fuel attachment.

 

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Ditch the factory toolkit.

Bring a small can of chain lube. Also, several pieces of cardboard to put behind the chain to protect the tire when you spray the lube.

Two tire pressure gauges. Test and compare both.

Flat tire repair tools. A plug kit and, possibly, a patch kit (if you'll be off pavement). Two, yes 2, air pumps. I carry a small high volume low pressure manual bicycle pump. Avoid the skinny high pressure bicycle pumps, they don't move much air. Also, a good electric air pump. I have the CyclePump. The electric pumps are amazing but sometimes fail, so have the hand pump as a backup.

Tire irons and a bead-breaker tool. If you need to install a patch you will need these tools. Optional if you are only on pavement and can accept using a tow truck if you can't plug a tire.

Some kind of Snap Jack type of device. Homemade or commercial product is ok.

A dozen disposable gloves for working on your bike. A bunch of paper towels or shop rags.

Spare valve cores and a core removal tool.

Spare clutch cable.

The usual assortment of pliers, wrenches, screw drivers, sockets.

Hex wrenches

I'm sure I've forgotten some things in mine. Bret has a couple of good videos on tool kits.

 

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That really depends on your abilities and willingness to do roadside repairs.

At a minimum I would say you need tools to be able to adjust the chain.

Tire repair kit, chain lube, zip ties, duct tape,

I recommend performing all the maintenance you can prior to leaving on the trip so you don't have to do while on the trip.

Lube cables, adjust, clean and lube chain, maintain air cleaner, replace tires if you feel they possibly won't last the length of the trip, change oil, etc.
To the tire repair kit, I'd add a small tire inflator like the Stop & Go RCP Mini-Air Compressor or the Slime 40059 Tire Inflator Jr. If you don't have a tire repair kit, the Stop & Go 76002 Tubeless Tire Repair Kit is compact. The Dynaplug Ultralite Tubeless Tire Repair Tool Kit looks interesting, but I've only ever used regular plugs. Be sure to add a 6" adjustable wrench to your basic kit. I prefer a small role of electric tape to Duct tape, but 'whatever'. This is a topic you can go into infinite loops on (and most guys do ;) ). Good luck.
 

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A mini adjustable crescent wrench, 5$ saved my bacon! Medium adjustable wrench is handy too.
I've used a small Vice Grip as a foot peg when I broke one off riding the dirt. You never know when you'll have to McGyver something.
 

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I've used a small Vice Grip as a foot peg when I broke one off riding the dirt
I remember you mentioning that before. Im gonna buy one of those mini vise-grips. This great fix on the fly put you in contention for the "Okie Engineering Award"!
 

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Yah - WAY-Y-Y easier than trying to bring a welder w/ you!

;)
 
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