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Discussion Starter #1
So I just replaced my chain. Got the screw on masterlink all situated. Looks great. The old chain was bunching so I slapped a new one on there. Didn't put new sprockets on (though I plan to after dealing with the controversial 'They wear together' and 'sprockets last longer than chains so don't worry about it'. The sprockets look good FYI but yeah..)

Anyway issue I'm running into is confusing. The chain is loose.. It's definitely 114 links. I ordered 114 links specifically and just counted them. And since the wheel was never adjusted back or forward for the new chain, I'm not sure why it would be? The images I included are on a rear stand so the chain is going to be a little loose as doesn't have the weight of the bike tightening it. Owner's manual says to measure it on its side stand. But it measures like.. 1 3/4-2 inches of slack (suppose to be 1 - 1 1/4 inch slack).

I can't figure out why it'd be loose? I've heard EK pre-stretches their chains (no idea what that means..?) so was considering maybe that's what's going on?

Anyway any advice would be great. I'm really baffled by this. And it's my first chain swap so not sure I'm measuring it wrong? Sprockets are OEM 16/46. Also included a picture of the screw masterlink that comes with the EK chains. Curious what the general opinion of those are? Thanks for any help you can offer :D
20200715_152154[1].jpg
20200715_152224[1].jpg
 

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Anyway issue I'm running into is confusing. The chain is loose.. It's definitely 114 links.
the wheel was never adjusted back or forward for the new chain

I can't figure out why it'd be loose?

Anyway any advice would be great. I'm really baffled by this. Thanks for any help you can offer :D
Crazy question... did you try adjusting the chain tighter? 🤷‍♀️
 

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Given that you didn't touch the adjuster nor the sprocket, the question is really "how loose was the old chain" before you removed it.
Put it flat and measure 10 links. do the same on new chain. (or maybe just rest the old next to the new).
If the old is shorter, now you have to worry.
 

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You mention that the old chain was "bunching"....maybe enough to account for the current looseness?
You didn't mention how much the links or how many were binding.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
OK I did just adjust the tensioners. Finally got that stupid cotter pin out, and had to make a trip to get a breaker bar, and a 27mm socket. Ugh.. First times are always the hardest, I suppose.

It took a bit of trial and error, and realization that even one or two turns on the tensioners makes a huge difference.

The old chain was binding in several spots, and no matter how much I lubed it and tried to get them to unbind, they stayed that way. New chain is exactly 114 links on a 16/46 sprocket (OEM). It actually didn't take a lot of movement and I got it just over an inch. Looks much better now. I'm still baffled why it'd be loose though? Someone told me it could do with the type of rings, or even manufacturer. Original was DID I think? New one is EK.

This is what the old one was doing:
20200707_195045[1].jpg
 

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My first impression is that the cocked links are what was taking up the slack on the old chain...as you found that you didn't need much movement to get proper sag.

The next question would be did you have some way to verify the chain alignment when you reset the length?
 

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My last chain is EK xring. I run a 15/44 and I remember taking out 1 or 2 links, maybe I counted the previous one. Got it more to the middle on the adjuster. Anyways, I found that the EK xring 520 hardly stretches over its life.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I used the method my friend suggested and that was to look down the chain and see how it lines up with the front sprocket. You can see the chain isn't aligned pretty easily. I'll ask a friend to double check it when I have a chance. You're probably right about the kinks taking up the slack. That would make sense.

I took it out for a ride and it's soooo smoooooooooth. Huge difference from the last one. I'm honestly very impressed with it.

Now... the last question is... Are these screw masterlinks safe? A friend swears that they're not secure, and I need to buy a proper riveted masterlink. You can see it in the original post on this thread. Second picture.

Also here's the chain now all tensioned right, and aligned:

20200715_203553[1].jpg
 

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I’ve used those EK chains and screw links for quite a while now and wouldn’t worry at all about those self rivet links. They aren’t the clip master links that people warn about. They press rivet the same as you would with tools but in a much easier process. I’ve logged about 70k miles on them without issue. I’ve had great luck with EK chains. That DID VP2 Thailand chain that comes from the factory was total garbage on the other hand.
Once adjusted that chain should last a while.
 

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I used the method my friend suggested and that was to look down the chain and see how it lines up with the front sprocket. You can see the chain isn't aligned pretty easily. I'll ask a friend to double check it when I have a chance. You're probably right about the kinks taking up the slack. That would make sense.

I took it out for a ride and it's soooo smoooooooooth. Huge difference from the last one. I'm honestly very impressed with it.

Now... the last question is... Are these screw masterlinks safe? A friend swears that they're not secure, and I need to buy a proper riveted masterlink. You can see it in the original post on this thread. Second picture.

Also here's the chain now all tensioned right, and aligned:

View attachment 179659
First I and several others have posted about the EK chain being superior, the screw link is equal to a rivet link if done properly, no offense but it was very easy to see which one was the screw link, the comment about lining up your new chain with old chain for stretch , obviously that person isn't familiar with the screw link, which BTW was 40% more $$ when it was a option over a rivet link, at the time it was like $16 Canadian from Fortnine, now included with the chain. As to alignment, something I do and caution needs to be exercised , I run the bike in gear on the pit stand, I have the bobbins so no worry about sliding off, my chain tracks center of the rear sprocket, that is there is a slight gap on both sides of the sprocket. I also have the laser chain tool and marked the adjusting nuts with a center punch mark, once aligned, move the same number of flats . As to slack, better on the loose side than the tight side.
And to your original question, you used lots of grease on that screw link, it appears you followed directions, and the design is such that once proper torque is reached, the end twists off.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've heard a lot of OEM stuff is junk. Tires. Chains. Brakes. Etc. Good to know that the chain was cheap and it may not have been entirely my fault lol. Still going to be much more diligent about proper chain maintenance.

Why would I be offended by it being obvious which is the screw link? I tightened it down until it wouldn't turn any further which is what it said to do. And yeah, that thing was smeared in every bit of chain lube that came in that little package lol. I wanted to make certain it was done correctly. Was also my second time with an angle grinder. First was removing the previous chain by cutting down the rivets. Pretty happy about how it turned out.

Honestly I also checked for rivet masterlinks and they seem weirdly hard to find locally. Most places have the clip-ons and I refuse to use those.

You can see where a chain deviates down to the front sprocket. It's very obvious. That's how I approached it. Looked down the line and aimed my vision at the same level as the top of the chain, towards the front sprocket, and checked if there was any shift in the flow of the chain. It should be really close to centered. But I'll be pestering a friend who knows more about this stuff, and see if he can double check it. Hoping I can do that today if I have time.

Twists off? You mean snaps off?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Grease Ninja. Well worth the price. It can be a bit fiddling to use at first, but it works waaay better than just a plastic spray straw.
Grease Ninja? Never heard of that stuff :eek:
I just bought some Motul cleaner, and lube too. Is it better than that?
 

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Grease Ninja is a tool. A nylon/plastic rectangular thingy with slots that sits on top of the chain. The spray straw goes into a small hole in it, and there are channels inside which direct the lube to the exact right place. Thus you get the lube exactly where it needs to go without it spraying all over or missing some links. Very clean and easy. I would suggest splurging to buy the 90 degree spray straw. A regular straw has to curve, and it makes it a bit awkward. The 90 isn't necessary but it looks to be a nice addition.

greaseninja.com
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Grease Ninja is a tool. A nylon/plastic rectangular thingy with slots that sits on top of the chain. The spray straw goes into a small hole in it, and there are channels inside which direct the lube to the exact right place. Thus you get the lube exactly where it needs to go without it spraying all over or missing some links. Very clean and easy. I would suggest splurging to buy the 90 degree spray straw. A regular straw has to curve, and it makes it a bit awkward. The 90 isn't necessary but it looks to be a nice addition.

greaseninja.com

Ooooh! Thank you for the suggestion!
 

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