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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The front countershaft sprocket nut refuses to come off. (I want to swap out the 14-tooth sprocket for a 15-tooth one.) Yes, I have flatted out the retaining washer around the 27-mm nut.

Despite lashing the rear sprocket to the swingarm with Nylon rope AND getting my friend to stand on the rear brake (gearbox in neutral) AND after heating up the nut with a heat gun AND using a pipe to lengthen the breaker bar leverage AND applying well over 120 ft lbs of torque, the nut refused to budge.

An electric impact driver made no difference.

I sprayed some penetrating oil and called it a day.

Tomorrow I will go to my friend's house and he will try his pneumatic impact drive on the nut. I could take it into the local motorcycle shop as a last resort, but they charge like a wounded rhinoceros.

Does anyone have any tips, incantations or magic spells/curses/charms that I could try?
 

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2017 Kawasaki Versys-x 300; 14/46 sprockets (stock);
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I used a pneumatic impact gun, and had no issues.

@jdrocks posted this in another discussion... if he likes it, it probably works well:

"take the drama out of the whole deal, get an inexpensive Sprocket Stuff removal tool. google it, watch the youtube. i've been using this tool for years and have made the same recommendation numerous times on this forum."

Maybe an option for you ?
 
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Versys X300, black/grey, stock, Kawi OEM hard cases, givi crashbars
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The front countershaft sprocket nut refuses to come off. (I want to swap out the 14-tooth sprocket for a 15-tooth one.) Yes, I have flatted out the retaining washer around the 27-mm nut.

Despite lashing the rear sprocket to the swingarm with Nylon rope AND getting my friend to stand on the rear brake (gearbox in neutral) AND after heating up the nut with a heat gun AND using a pipe to lengthen the breaker bar leverage AND applying well over 120 ft lbs of torque, the nut refused to budge.

An electric impact driver made no difference.

I sprayed some penetrating oil and called it a day.

Tomorrow I will go to my friend's house and he will try his pneumatic impact drive on the nut. I could take it into the local motorcycle shop as a last resort, but they charge like a wounded rhinoceros.

Does anyone have any tips, incantations or magic spells/curses/charms that I could try?
The front countershaft sprocket nut refuses to come off. (I want to swap out the 14-tooth sprocket for a 15-tooth one.) Yes, I have flatted out the retaining washer around the 27-mm nut.
Hello there,
Lefty loosey, righty tighty…
Being a man, it’s hard to admit that brute force is sometimes not quite enough when a part refuses to cooperate. I mean, the nut is just doing it’s job staying tight and we are thankful it did.
My Father in law showed me a trick he learned working in the family sawmill on the river.
I have used it several times on similar problems with great success.
First get the bike cold, colder the better so the steel contracts. Then heat a deep heavy 27mm socket in a vice with a small torch. Then slide the hot socket on the nut to be removed, add a bit of heat to the socket again to expand and loosen the nuts bite on the cold shaft.
Hope this helps, teddy…


Despite lashing the rear sprocket to the swingarm with Nylon rope AND getting my friend to stand on the rear brake (gearbox in neutral) AND after heating up the nut with a heat gun AND using a pipe to lengthen the breaker bar leverage AND applying well over 120 ft lbs of torque, the nut refused to budge.

An electric impact driver made no difference.

I sprayed some penetrating oil and called it a day.

Tomorrow I will go to my friend's house and he will try his pneumatic impact drive on the nut. I could take it into the local motorcycle shop as a last resort, but they charge like a wounded rhinoceros.

Does anyone have any tips, incantations or magic spells/curses/charms that I could try?
[
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I might be making progress.
I took the chain completely off the drive sprocket.
I took a short piece of steel pipe (about 3 cm diameter and 6 cm long) and wedged the pipe lengthwise between one of the lower teeth of the sprocket and the pivot of the swing arm (steel). Now the sprocket can't move when I apply torque.
I tried my torque wrench, but didn't want to exceed 120 ft lbs. I was worried that I would wreck my torque wrench. (I need to borrow a breaker bar). (The manual says the tightening torque for this 27 mm nut is 93 ft lbs.)

Tomorrow I'll borrow a heat gun and a breaker bar (with a pipe extension for greater leverage) and try to crack this nut.

No more Mr. Nice-guy.
 

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People have the same problem on the 650. I have one of those cheap plug in electric impact guns from Harbor Freight and it spun the nut off with no problem. I left the chain on, with the bike in neutral, and a 2x4 through the back wheel resting on the swingarm. Not even sure any of that was necessary.
 

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I might be making progress.
I took the chain completely off the drive sprocket.
I took a short piece of steel pipe (about 3 cm diameter and 6 cm long) and wedged the pipe lengthwise between one of the lower teeth of the sprocket and the pivot of the swing arm (steel). Now the sprocket can't move when I apply torque.
I tried my torque wrench, but didn't want to exceed 120 ft lbs. I was worried that I would wreck my torque wrench. (I need to borrow a breaker bar). (The manual says the tightening torque for this 27 mm nut is 93 ft lbs.)

Tomorrow I'll borrow a heat gun and a breaker bar (with a pipe extension for greater leverage) and try to crack this nut.

No more Mr. Nice-guy.

A bit of advice. You need a socket, the pipe might work, try the electric impact. You should have left the chain on. I used the rear wheel on a 2X4 forcing the bike forward , which kept pressure on the socket.
Using a heat gun is a waste of time, you need either map gas torch.Roughly 30 seconds of heating
You have roughly 3 seconds to apply your impact. What happens is heat travels to the shaft, end result is no change. By applying heat several things happen, you take the temper out of the nut, and should buy a new one. Heating the nut quickly causes the nut to expand, which makes removal much easier, if you have never done it, best not to experiment now. Keep in mind there is a shaft seal you don't want to damage.
 

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I might be making progress.
I took the chain completely off the drive sprocket.
I took a short piece of steel pipe (about 3 cm diameter and 6 cm long) and wedged the pipe lengthwise between one of the lower teeth of the sprocket and the pivot of the swing arm (steel). Now the sprocket can't move when I apply torque.
I tried my torque wrench, but didn't want to exceed 120 ft lbs. I was worried that I would wreck my torque wrench. (I need to borrow a breaker bar). (The manual says the tightening torque for this 27 mm nut is 93 ft lbs.)

Tomorrow I'll borrow a heat gun and a breaker bar (with a pipe extension for greater leverage) and try to crack this nut.

No more Mr. Nice-guy.
I really like this meme and seems to fit! Good luck.

Product Wood Font Bicycle part Tool
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
We did it!
Three people to get that nut off (cold). One holding the bike, one holding the socket in place, and the third man leveraging the 1-meter-long bar (breaker bar + steel pipe). It made a loud "crack" and the rest was a piece of cake.
Torqued the new nut on to the specified 93 ft lbs.

Afterwards, I took the bike for a ride on the motorway. The "shortness of breath" effect of the low gearing is now gone, and the Versys-X accelerates better through the gears up to highway speed. Riding through the suburbs, I now find myself in 5th (instead of 6th). From a red light, the spacing between the gear changes is now much more reasonable. Instead of 1-2-3-4----5------6, it's now 1--2---3-----4-----5 (keep 6th for later).

On reflection, the stock 14-tooth sprocket would be better for dirt roads and two-up riding, but the 15-tooth is far better for the one-up and highway riding.
 

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Glad you got that rascal off, and are pleased with the results! Happy riding 👍🏻
 
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