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Does your 2019+ V1000 produce significant engine vibration in the seat and handlebars

  • Mine has no noticeable engine vibration at any rpm - silky smooth

    Votes: 2 22.2%
  • Mine has slight vibration at higher rpms - perhaps above 6000 rpm - but otherwise very smooth

    Votes: 4 44.4%
  • Mine has a significant vibration above 4000 rpms - buzzy for sure

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Mine is noticeably buzzy at any engine speed above idle

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All:

Thought I’d start a poll for the V1000 folks. I’ve owned my 2020 now for a little over a month and have logged over 1000 miles. I’m still quite happy with the bike, but inquiring minds want to know… Do you get the buzzies in your seat and gloves?

Mine has about 4800 miles and the clock and I do feel s significant amount in seat and in my hands (wearing riding gloves for sure). I came from a Goldwing, so perhaps I’m spoiled, but otherwise I really enjoy the bike.

I’m curious if the vibration lessens with miles on engine (mine is hardly broken in), or perhaps I need a good throttle body sync.

I picked the 3rd poll item. The buzz is not all that bad, but I could endeavor for more smoothness.
 

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Hello All:

Thought I’d start a poll for the V1000 folks. I’ve owned my 2020 now for a little over a month and have logged over 1000 miles. I’m still quite happy with the bike, but inquiring minds want to know… Do you get the buzzies in your seat and gloves?

Mine has about 4800 miles and the clock and I do feel s significant amount in seat and in my hands (wearing riding gloves for sure). I came from a Goldwing, so perhaps I’m spoiled, but otherwise I really enjoy the bike.

I’m curious if the vibration lessens with miles on engine (mine is hardly broken in), or perhaps I need a good throttle body sync.

I picked the 3rd poll item. The buzz is not all that bad, but I could endeavor for more smoothness.
Cool pole. I voted higher vibes above 6K. My 2019 V1K does vibrate a bit in the higher RPMs but I came from bikes that made a lot more vibration so from my perspective the engine seems pretty smooth. I run an aftermarket seat so perhaps that makes a difference? One change I made to the V1K is moving to a 16T front sprocket and 41T rear. I love the results, lower RPMs at higher speeds. First gear is taller so this change may not be great for those that do a lot of stop and go traffic. I don't, so no issue. The spedo and odometer are still spot on after the sprocket change.

 

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Hello All:

Thought I’d start a poll for the V1000 folks. I’ve owned my 2020 now for a little over a month and have logged over 1000 miles. I’m still quite happy with the bike, but inquiring minds want to know… Do you get the buzzies in your seat and gloves?

Mine has about 4800 miles and the clock and I do feel s significant amount in seat and in my hands (wearing riding gloves for sure). I came from a Goldwing, so perhaps I’m spoiled, but otherwise I really enjoy the bike.

I’m curious if the vibration lessens with miles on engine (mine is hardly broken in), or perhaps I need a good throttle body sync.

I picked the 3rd poll item. The buzz is not all that bad, but I could endeavor for more smoothness.
More feedback. Thinking about your vibration question I paid closer attention to the vibration on my 19 V1K while riding into work. Sure enough it does vibrate at 4K RPM then subsides then stronger vibrations at 6K. At 4K the pegs vibrate (more pronounced in the left peg). At 6K there is a stronger vibration I feel in the seat and plastic covers. With the 16/41 gearing (stock is 15/43), and in 6th gear, 3K is (approx) 55MPH, 3.5K is 65MPH and 4K is 75MPH. I rarely exceed 65MPH when commuting so this may be a partial reason why the vibration wasn't noticed. At 6K RPM in 6th gear and stock gearing the bike is moving at 100MPH - there is a lot going on at that speed so vibration probably isn't the first thing I would notice.

I do want to stress the vibration at 4K RPM is quite mild and isn't that noticeable to me unless I'm looking for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
More feedback. Thinking about your vibration question I paid closer attention to the vibration on my 19 V1K while riding into work. Sure enough it does vibrate at 4K RPM then subsides then stronger vibrations at 6K. At 4K the pegs vibrate (more pronounced in the left peg). At 6K there is a stronger vibration I feel in the seat and plastic covers. With the 16/41 gearing (stock is 15/43), and in 6th gear, 3K is (approx) 55MPH, 3.5K is 65MPH and 4K is 75MPH. I rarely exceed 65MPH when commuting so this may be a partial reason why the vibration wasn't noticed. At 6K RPM in 6th gear and stock gearing the bike is moving at 100MPH - there is a lot going on at that speed so vibration probably isn't the first thing I would notice.

I do want to stress the vibration at 4K RPM is quite mild and isn't that noticeable to me unless I'm looking for it.
Thank you for the detailed breakdown… 4K does seem to be the trigger point for mine and perhaps yours as well. Mine has a full aftermarket exhaust, which perhaps amplifies the vibration somewhat. I have a theory that restoring the original exhaust may lessen the amplitude of the vibration

Best regards
Steve
 

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I did an hour test ride on a ‘19 yesterday and it had the typical I-4 high frequency buzz in the seat, pegs and bars above 4000 RPMs and quite a bit of vibration and noise in the 7000 plus RPMs.
If someone says their bike is smooth as silk they have a different tolerance or perception of vibration than others.
You are sitting on an engine. If you don’t want to know you are sitting on an engine then buy a bike with a motor instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think twowheeladdict has a good point… these engines are certainly buzzy by their very design. For me, I think I will get used to it as I get more time in the saddle. And as I say, the bike has an aftermarket exhaust system, which does have a certain raspy rattle to it. There’s a lot to like about this bike :cool:
 

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I did an hour test ride on a ‘19 yesterday and it had the typical I-4 high frequency buzz in the seat, pegs and bars above 4000 RPMs and quite a bit of vibration and noise in the 7000 plus RPMs.
If someone says their bike is smooth as silk they have a different tolerance or perception of vibration than others.
You are sitting on an engine. If you don’t want to know you are sitting on an engine then buy a bike with a motor instead.
Assuming you test rode a '19 V1K, curious to hear your thoughts on the engine, bike etc.
 

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Assuming you test rode a '19 V1K, curious to hear your thoughts on the engine, bike etc.
 

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I've always considered my 2020 Versys 1000 to be silky smooth. Especially under 6k rpms.

But recently I had to cover about 500 miles in a short time, was running 85 - 90mph for several hours straight. Every so often I found my hands just about going numb from the buzzing vibration. I was able to shake it off every time, thank goodness for cruise control. Was able to keep on going without having to pull over. But it was surely annoying after a while.

By comparison, I've ridden other bikes where the highway speed vibration was so bad that my hands would become almost completely numb in a short amount of time, to the point where pulling over occasionally was necessary. My Versys 1000 is nowhere near that bad, but the degree of vibration still made the ride a bit less pleasant than it could have been. I'd regularly need to "shake out" either of my hands, got used to it after a while, but still annoying.

I of course make every effort to not clutch the grips more tightly than necessary and try to make sure I'm not supporting any weight on my hands, against the bars. I do always wear riding gloves, though they are not heavily padded.

I wish there was some type of anti-vibe handlebar dampening system that would easily fit on this bike. It seems the stock handlebar mount is 100% solid, no shock absorption (as found on many other bikes). I think all bikes should have some type of handlebar vibration absorption system, rubber mounts or whatever. Handlebar vibration is never a good thing. Yes, it has bar-ends, but that's apparently not enough, especially for the higher "buzz" frequencies.

I feel this bike overall indeed comes across as being extremely smooth and I love its smoothness. It's an awesome machine! But, like many 4-cylinder engines, it will surely "buzz", at least at higher rpms, under load... and can get your hands tingling away after a while. So, while it would seem a 4-cylinder should yield the most "vibe-free" experience compared to other similar type bikes of fewer cylinders, this is not necessarily so. It may be high on the scale in terms of overall smooth feel and character, but that doesn't mean it won't get your hands tingling.

Been riding a KTM 1290 more recently, the V-twin in this bike surely has more "throb" and "shake" to it, more "pulsing" from the cylinders, not "silky" like the Versys, but yet once you get the revs up, it smooths out impressively so. Thus far, at high speeds, this bike has been proving to be less of a hand-tingler than the Versys. Different frequencies. But I still have yet to run at 85mph for several hours straight on it.

There's surely something to be said for the linear behavior of a 4-cylinder across the entire rev range, the Versys has a certain rich, refined character that is unmatched by any of the 2 and 3-cylinder adventure / sport-touring bikes, in my opinion. It makes it a keeper for me. Love this bike! But it's not my only bike. :)
 

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I've always considered my 2020 Versys 1000 to be silky smooth. Especially under 6k rpms.

But recently I had to cover about 500 miles in a short time, was running 85 - 90mph for several hours straight. Every so often I found my hands just about going numb from the buzzing vibration. I was able to shake it off every time, thank goodness for cruise control. Was able to keep on going without having to pull over. But it was surely annoying after a while.

By comparison, I've ridden other bikes where the highway speed vibration was so bad that my hands would become almost completely numb in a short amount of time, to the point where pulling over occasionally was necessary. My Versys 1000 is nowhere near that bad, but the degree of vibration still made the ride a bit less pleasant than it could have been. I'd regularly need to "shake out" either of my hands, got used to it after a while, but still annoying.

I of course make every effort to not clutch the grips more tightly than necessary and try to make sure I'm not supporting any weight on my hands, against the bars. I do always wear riding gloves, though they are not heavily padded.

I wish there was some type of anti-vibe handlebar dampening system that would easily fit on this bike. It seems the stock handlebar mount is 100% solid, no shock absorption (as found on many other bikes). I think all bikes should have some type of handlebar vibration absorption system, rubber mounts or whatever. Handlebar vibration is never a good thing. Yes, it has bar-ends, but that's apparently not enough, especially for the higher "buzz" frequencies.

I feel this bike overall indeed comes across as being extremely smooth and I love its smoothness. It's an awesome machine! But, like many 4-cylinder engines, it will surely "buzz", at least at higher rpms, under load... and can get your hands tingling away after a while. So, while it would seem a 4-cylinder should yield the most "vibe-free" experience compared to other similar type bikes of fewer cylinders, this is not necessarily so. It may be high on the scale in terms of overall smooth feel and character, but that doesn't mean it won't get your hands tingling.

Been riding a KTM 1290 more recently, the V-twin in this bike surely has more "throb" and "shake" to it, more "pulsing" from the cylinders, not "silky" like the Versys, but yet once you get the revs up, it smooths out impressively so. Thus far, at high speeds, this bike has been proving to be less of a hand-tingler than the Versys. Different frequencies. But I still have yet to run at 85mph for several hours straight on it.

There's surely something to be said for the linear behavior of a 4-cylinder across the entire rev range, the Versys has a certain rich, refined character that is unmatched by any of the 2 and 3-cylinder adventure / sport-touring bikes, in my opinion. It makes it a keeper for me. Love this bike! But it's not my only bike. :)
Just throwing this out there, the stock sprocket combo is 15/43, changing to 16/41 set up reduces the engine RPM from 5453 RPM to 4875 RPM at 90 MPH which keeps the engine further away from the high vibration zone at high speeds. The gearing change did not affect the spedo/odometer what so ever on my 2019 V1K. The gas mileage didn't change (or maybe got a little better when riding at slower speeds). The trade off is a taller first gear so stop and go traffic may need more clutching.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Update to original post…. So after a few more miles in the saddle, it seems to me like the engine is getting smoother… Is that weird? Well perhaps I just getting used to it, but it seems like I sort of figured out a window of between 4000-4200 rpm, where its more pronounced (See it in the mirrors and feel it the hand grips). Below 4, its really pretty smooth… At about 4400, it starts getting smooth again and the mirrors do not vibrate…

Also, its quite possible that I am just getting use to the vibration and it doesn’t much bother me any more…. I rode goldwings for about 12 years, and they were smooth like butter, though not as much fun to ride as the V1000😄
 

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...the stock sprocket combo is 15/43, changing to 16/41 set up reduces the engine RPM from 5453 RPM to 4875 RPM at 90 MPH which keeps the engine further away from the high vibration zone...
Excellent information! Thanks!

Did you do the sprocket swap yourself? How difficult is it to change the front sprocket? What's involved? I've never swapped a front sprocket before.

Shall I assume that the chain size (amount of links) remains the same as original with this particular sprocket swap? Or...?

For normal accelerations from a stop, do you find a noticeable amount more clutch slipping needed to get the bike going, or is it negligible? I mean, does it now feel like you're starting from a stop in 2nd gear?

As it is now, the stock Versys 1000 seems to have very low gearing across the board. Often when just accelerating normally around town, I wind up getting up into 6th gear right away and often go to shift again, expecting another gear... but then there isn't one... feels like there should be.

I think this bike would benefit overall from taller gearing... at least unless one spends 90% of the time on a race track. I do plenty of spirited riding in the twisties etc, but I'm not out drag racing for money or anything. :)

Thanks!
 

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Excellent information! Thanks!

Did you do the sprocket swap yourself? How difficult is it to change the front sprocket? What's involved? I've never swapped a front sprocket before.

Shall I assume that the chain size (amount of links) remains the same as original with this particular sprocket swap? Or...?

For normal accelerations from a stop, do you find a noticeable amount more clutch slipping needed to get the bike going, or is it negligible? I mean, does it now feel like you're starting from a stop in 2nd gear?

As it is now, the stock Versys 1000 seems to have very low gearing across the board. Often when just accelerating normally around town, I wind up getting up into 6th gear right away and often go to shift again, expecting another gear... but then there isn't one... feels like there should be.

I think this bike would benefit overall from taller gearing... at least unless one spends 90% of the time on a race track. I do plenty of spirited riding in the twisties etc, but I'm not out drag racing for money or anything. :)

Thanks!
May want to go through the thread referenced below. Removing the front sprocket was not bad (unlike some of the V650 horror stories). The chain length stays the same but the rear wheel does sit ~0.3" (estimate) further back in the swing arm slot with lots of adjustment range to spare. The gearing commander web site will calculate that for you.

My observations on the stock gearing were exactly as you describe. The V1K has an amazingly flat torque curve that starts at low revs so why waste it on low gearing? Even around town I was sometimes looking for "7th"gear.

For me, the new gearing was exactly what I wanted. Works great for commuting (light suburban), pleasure rides and longer distance trips. One of the really good things about the gearing change is the engine rarely hits 6K RPM (where the vibration gets worse). The bike feels more relaxed even at highway speeds (80+MPH) yet still accelerates well in top gear.

Yes, first gear is noticeably taller and does take slightly more clutch to get moving. Since I ride solo and don't do much stop and go the taller first gear is no issue but is definitely something to consider if you do lots of stop and go, especially with a passenger and luggage.

Gas mileage seems to have improved slightly with the new gearing when commuting and on country roads (around 49MPG) but drops like a rock at high speeds.

I never ride at a track and don't do any kind of street racing so no comment on that.

Again, for me, the gearing change was a really great mod that I intend to keep as long as I have the bike.

 
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