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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if any of you recommend using Mobil 1 or other synthetic oils in your Versys?
 

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I was wondering if any of you recommend using Mobil 1 or other synthetic oils in your Versys?
unless the owners manuel calls for it ,no, I run it in my Triumph as it calls for it , but use Valvoline or Pennzoil MC oil in my Versys,it is more than up to doing the job.Ps this thread is gonna get like all other oil threads so i will not return :eek::blah:
 

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Put Rotella T6 synthetic 5w40 in mine yesterday.... it is certified JASO-MA for motorcycle use...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The manual also calls for oil changes every 6k miles too, if I read it right. That's ridiculous. I would never go more than 3-4k without changing oil.
 

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I am using AMS Oil since the first oil change and have had no problem for my 11000 KM:teetertooter:
 

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Oil changes are cheap insurance for engine life. Using synthetic oil should be fine in almost any motor that is still relatively low miles on it. This obviously varies engine to engine. I won't be waiting 6k miles between changes regardless of what type.:forgetit:
 

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I run syn. for 10k, have for years and have had no problems. Several bikes with more miles on them then most people ride in their whole life.
 

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Oil change intervals is actually recommended at every 7500 miles (12000 kms)... I use Amsoil synthetic, and change it at every 2500 miles or so. You can get any Amsoil product from http://www.woodsbrosracing.com/amsoil-online-store.htm at over 20% off with the promo code. I end up saving over 40% compared to getting it from Canadian Tire, and it's at my door in a couple days after ordering. :thumb:
 

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Using synthetic oil should be fine in almost any motor that is still relatively low miles on it.
I think I have read something like this somewhere before. Why does it matter how many miles are on the bike before switching to Synthetic oil?
Thanks, John
 

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There are no special requirements; however, in older vehicles or those with high mileage, it may be advisable to use AMSOIL Engine Flush first. This will ensure that the engine is clean and free of any accumulated contaminants which might have an effect on the service life of AMSOIL Motor Oils. In all cases, it is good judgement to install a new AMSOIL Absolute Efficiency Oil Filter (EaO) every time you change oil.

In modern vehicles, there is no risk of AMSOIL motor oil leaking. In fact, AMSOIL motor oil is fully compatible with modern seal materials. It is properly formulated to condition seals, keeping them pliable to prevent leakage.

These were copied from the Amsoil Website FAQ located HERE

One of the sponsors of these Motorcycle forums is a Amsoil Dealer. I would suggest you contact them if you have any questions. If you decide to go the Amsoil route which I personally very highly suggest <G> be sure to look into a preferred customer account. It will pay for itself in no time at all.
I use Amsoil products and will soon be changing the V over to it and will then be 100% Amsoil.
 

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I use Castrol Synthetic 5-40 automotive because I bought a bunch on sale for my VW diesel. Basically any automotive oil will work as long as it does not have the energy saving logo on the bottle. The friction modifiers they add to make it "energy saving" don't work well with the wet clutch most bikes have.
 

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My experience has been if you use a good quuality petroleum based oil (i.e. GTX, Valvoline, etc) and change your oil every 3000 miles, you'll be just fine. I have a KLR650A1 that has 34,000 miles on it and I have had no trouble with the bike at all. When I did the "doohicky"" upgrade the inside of the engine was clean with no apparant excessive wear. The synthetics are good oils to use if you are going to run the snot out of the bike or are in an area of extreme heat. Just my 2 cents.
Greg
 

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My experience has been if you use a good quuality petroleum based oil (i.e. GTX, Valvoline, etc) and change your oil every 3000 miles, you'll be just fine. The synthetics are good oils to use if you are going to run the snot out of the bike or are in an area of extreme heat. Just my 2 cents.
Greg
:thumb:

Using synthetics because of the hot humid weather here, smoother shifting and our V have only 1.7L (without oil filter change) in her.
 

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I only use synthetic if I feel a problem to start w/. Then I only stay w/it, if I feel a nice improvement. Rotella T either way, but usually the standard stuff for cheap. I change it every 5K miles or every 6 months, whichever comes first (As a rule.). I just don't believe it's that critical...
 

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I use Castrol Synthetic 5-40 automotive because I bought a bunch on sale for my VW diesel. Basically any automotive oil will work as long as it does not have the energy saving logo on the bottle. The friction modifiers they add to make it "energy saving" don't work well with the wet clutch most bikes have.
Only engine oils of up to W-30 viscosity can be energy conserving rated. Friction modifiers which are not wet clutch compatible are still found in some automotive W-40 and higher viscosity oils. Motorcycle specific oils are JASO MA certified for high friction applications, as recommended by Kawasaki.
From Castrol; "Note: The low friction characteristics of Castrol Edge 0W-40 make it unsuitable for most motorcycles that incorporate wet clutches in combined engine and transmission systems. Castrol’s prime recommendation for this application is Castrol R4 Superbike."

"Castrol does not recommend using automotive oils in motorcycles. In 1996, the American Petroleum Institute (API) upgraded the performance standards of automotive oil from SG to SJ (currently SM). This upgrade impacted the friction modifiers and zinc and phosphorus levels, to address the fuel economy, catalytic converter and pollution issues of passenger car owners. For motorcycles, the additional friction modifiers can affect wet clutch performance, and motorcycle engines appreciate a higher level of the anti-wear ingredients of zinc and phosphorus. We have formulated our line of Castrol Motorcycle oils to be API SG. This allows us to optimize the formula specifically for motorcycles without being constrained by the specification demands for passenger car engines, which our passenger car oil must meet. All Castrol Motorcycle oils have low volatility to reduce the effects of oil evaporation, and they can be up to 50% lower than many API SL/SJ passenger car engine oils. API SJ engine oils have a minimal shear stability requirement; therefore, some types may lose their viscosity more quickly when used in a motorcycle, due to the stresses of these bike engines."

There's also Shell's excellent Rotella T6 synthetic 5W-40 that's available for less as it's not JASO MA labeled, but still passes the tests. According to Richard Moore, Staff Engineer at Shell Global Solutions (US) Inc., Westhollow Technology Center, Houston, TX (800-231-6950):
"We recently ran the JASO MA friction test on Rotella T with Triple Protection 15W-40, Rotella T Synthetic 5W-40 (CI-4, discontinued) and our Rotella T6 Synthetic 5W-40 CJ-4. All three oils passed the wet clutch friction test. Rotella T Synthetic 5W-40 (CI-4) has more than 1.2% ash (JASO MA spec limit) so it can not be classified as JASO MA. However, Rotella T with Triple Protection 15W-40 and our Rotella T6 Synthetic 5W-40 CJ-4 do meet JASO MA."

http://www.shell.com/home/Framework?siteId=rotella-en&FC2=/rotella-en/html/iwgen/leftnavs/zzz_lhn2_0_0.html&FC3=/rotella-en/html/iwgen/products/products_home.html
 

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Only engine oils of up to W-30 viscosity can be energy conserving rated. Friction modifiers which are not wet clutch compatible are still found in some automotive W-40 and higher viscosity oils. Motorcycle specific oils are JASO MA certified for high friction applications, as recommended by Kawasaki.
From Castrol; "Note: The low friction characteristics of Castrol Edge 0W-40 make it unsuitable for most motorcycles that incorporate wet clutches in combined engine and transmission systems. Castrol’s prime recommendation for this application is Castrol R4 Superbike."

"Castrol does not recommend using automotive oils in motorcycles. In 1996, the American Petroleum Institute (API) upgraded the performance standards of automotive oil from SG to SJ (currently SM). This upgrade impacted the friction modifiers and zinc and phosphorus levels, to address the fuel economy, catalytic converter and pollution issues of passenger car owners. For motorcycles, the additional friction modifiers can affect wet clutch performance, and motorcycle engines appreciate a higher level of the anti-wear ingredients of zinc and phosphorus. We have formulated our line of Castrol Motorcycle oils to be API SG. This allows us to optimize the formula specifically for motorcycles without being constrained by the specification demands for passenger car engines, which our passenger car oil must meet. All Castrol Motorcycle oils have low volatility to reduce the effects of oil evaporation, and they can be up to 50% lower than many API SL/SJ passenger car engine oils. API SJ engine oils have a minimal shear stability requirement; therefore, some types may lose their viscosity more quickly when used in a motorcycle, due to the stresses of these bike engines."

There's also Shell's excellent Rotella T6 synthetic 5W-40 that's available for less as it's not JASO MA labeled, but still passes the tests. According to Richard Moore, Staff Engineer at Shell Global Solutions (US) Inc., Westhollow Technology Center, Houston, TX (800-231-6950):
"We recently ran the JASO MA friction test on Rotella T with Triple Protection 15W-40, Rotella T Synthetic 5W-40 (CI-4, discontinued) and our Rotella T6 Synthetic 5W-40 CJ-4. All three oils passed the wet clutch friction test. Rotella T Synthetic 5W-40 (CI-4) has more than 1.2% ash (JASO MA spec limit) so it can not be classified as JASO MA. However, Rotella T with Triple Protection 15W-40 and our Rotella T6 Synthetic 5W-40 CJ-4 do meet JASO MA."
Shell's Rotella T5 semi-synthetic is also a good choice.

http://www.shell.com/home/Framework?siteId=rotella-en&FC2=/rotella-en/html/iwgen/leftnavs/zzz_lhn2_0_0.html&FC3=/rotella-en/html/iwgen/products/products_home.html
Invader.:thanx:

Need a liitle feed back on Motul 5100 Semi-Syn 15W/50.

:cheers:
 

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I have a car with 120,000 miles and change the oil with Syn. every 5000 miles. I also have a car that requires an oil change every 15,000. Nobody knows your engine oil requirements better that it's maker.
My Versys is new with less than 200 miles but at the 800 mile check I will go with Amsoil motorcycle oil and change it every 10,000.
I also use syn. in my John Deere rider, wave runner, Volvo and Porsche and GMC Typhoon(120,000 miles).
Because of the wet clutch try to use only motorcycle oil.

Cb
 

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Use whatever you like as long as it is JASO MA certified. Always change the oil filter (I never understood why people would change the oil and not the filter). The cleaner you keep your oil the fewer contaminates you will have in your engine. My understanding is that you should use petroleum based oil until you have completed the engine break-in. I believe that the manufacturer's oil change interval is based on using petroleum based oil so you could go longer with synthetic, but why! It only takes two quarts and a filter, plus it is so damn easy! Take care of your engine and it will take care of you!!!
 
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