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The I.R.S.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
When we hit quadrillion sh#$ is going to hit the fan! :eek:
In twenty years we are going to have a problem. Until than it's a war on the US dollar. :eek:

The reason I guess it at twenty is because the US and now Canada has found huge amounts of energy. Its a new energy game now! :D :thumb:

Even old Boone Pickins admits its a new ball game now.


:sleeping:
 

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I remember how strange it was to hear a trillion! WTH! :eek:

Now its time to learn the rest of the numbers. Because we are on our way! :eek: :(

Here is a run down! :eek:

http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/378443

Interestingly most computer languages in use today reserve 4 bytes of memory for a standard integer. This means the biggest number you can represent in it's entirety is plus or minus 2,147,483,648. After that you have to round off the least significant digits and use exponents which means you can have a loss of precision or use another work around.
 

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Interestingly most computer languages in use today reserve 4 bytes of memory for a standard integer. This means the biggest number you can represent in it's entirety is plus or minus 2,147,483,648. After that you have to round off the least significant digits and use exponents which means you can have a loss of precision or use another work around.
64-bit architectures have enabled double length integer variables to be included in recent versions of C, C#, Java, SQL, Pascal, and probably others that I didn't look up. That limits us to 9,223,372,036,854,775,807 (18,446,744,073,709,551,615 unsigned, unless you're in Java, which apparently doesn't support unsigned int).

I didn't really know any of that. Had to ask Google. I also realize I'm being That Guy.
 

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Interestingly most computer languages in use today reserve 4 bytes of memory for a standard integer. This means the biggest number you can represent in it's entirety is plus or minus 2,147,483,648. After that you have to round off the least significant digits and use exponents which means you can have a loss of precision or use another work around.
i thought this was really difficult to understand till my 6 yr old grandaughter explaned it to me..
 
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