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Discussion Starter #1
So I was all excited about changing my tires after 8000 miles on my 2012 Versys and sh€£ happend. The rear tire went on with a little struggle but the front tire wouldn't and I subjected it to brute force that ripped it. I was all excited, bought all the tools and a front stand based on recommendations from other members. Now I will just suck it up and take it to cycle gear :(

Michelin PR4s ImageUploadedByMO Free1406415544.211290.jpg


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That doesn't look salvageable. I usually do all my own tires on three bikes. The PR4 are the first tires I took to a local guy, $10/wheel off the bike. Usually I have less trouble with fronts. If you are having difficulty you ain't doin' it right. The secret is getting the tire into the well in the center of the wheel. Also lotsa lube helps. Don't laugh but I use K-Y.
 

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Ouch....
 

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That photo looks familiar...same situation convinced me to by more tools. :thumb:
No-Mar bar & lube plus tire mounting base.
Now my neighbors come over more often. :thumbdown:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That doesn't look salvageable. I usually do all my own tires on three bikes. The PR4 are the first tires I took to a local guy, $10/wheel off the bike. Usually I have less trouble with fronts. If you are having difficulty you ain't doin' it right. The secret is getting the tire into the well in the center of the wheel. Also lotsa lube helps. Don't laugh but I use K-Y.
I just used soap water (evidently NOT enough). After damaging the tire, I remembered all the tips I saw on tire changes like push the tire to center of the rim, use vegetable based lube. Waltermitty : Coincidentally, I thought about KY as a potential too :). If the average person takes 1 hour to do a DIY. I take about 4 for lack of skill and dexterity (back pain, knee pain) and I am only 35
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That photo looks familiar...same situation convinced me to by more tools. :thumb:
No-Mar bar & lube plus tire mounting base.
Now my neighbors come over more often. :thumbdown:
I blame the members of this forum. You make everything look so damn easy ;). I changed the spark plugs on my own and I thought f*** yeah I am bloody good. Humbling experience.
 

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I feel your pain. I changed both of my tires this last winter to PR4's. I did it with manual tools and had proper lube. There is a knack to it. They will come right off when you find the sweet spot of where to hook the spoons and how to keep the tire beads in the well. Once the sweet spot is found, there is not need to force anything.

Full disclosure, the front tire was easier than the rear and it took a while with each. I changed the front tire one evening and the rear the next. There was some cussing and tons of sweating while going round and round trying to find the easy off/on. A couple times, I thought they were not going to budge but persistence won.

I highly suggest rim protectors, I bought two 2 packs.

This is the video I went by:



Here is the lube I used: http://amzn.com/B007GFML72
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I feel your pain. I changed both of my tires this last winter to PR4's. I did it with manual tools and had proper lube. There is a knack to it. They will come right off when you find the sweet spot of where to hook the spoons and how to keep the tire beads in the well. Once the sweet spot is found, there is not need to force anything.

Full disclosure, the front tire was easier than the rear and it took a while with each. I changed the front tire one evening and the rear the next. There was some cussing and tons of sweating while going round and round trying to find the easy off/on. A couple times, I thought they were not going to budge but persistence won.

I highly suggest rim protectors, I bought two 2 packs.

This is the video I went by:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQZM402U2x4


Here is the lube I used: http://amzn.com/B007GFML72
I should have done the front and rear over two days too Capn! Infact while researching what went wrong and what tire lube to use, I came across your review of 1.7 formula 8 (i think) on amazon and had a face palm moment! I thought I read and saw enough but then realized I did a lot of things incorrectly. I asked my wife if I should order a new tire and try again. She said she would use the tire spoon to do things to me so I just dropped off the rim at cycle gear. I will just look forward to the next set of tire change.
 

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That doesn't look salvageable. I usually do all my own tires on three bikes. The PR4 are the first tires I took to a local guy, $10/wheel off the bike. Usually I have less trouble with fronts. If you are having difficulty you ain't doin' it right. The secret is getting the tire into the well in the center of the wheel. Also lotsa lube helps. Don't laugh but I use K-Y.
I have used WD40 as a lube (ONCE - worked well!), but generally use proper tire lube I buy from the tire shops, about half a liter at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Versys gods,

I have done it! Cyclegear's tire changing machine was bust (the compressor had a problem they told me). I brought the new front tire that I purchased from them home this evening and mounted it, and balanced it myself! Thank you for all the valuable advice. Very satisfying.
 

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Versys gods,

I have done it! Cyclegear's tire changing machine was bust (the compressor had a problem they told me). I brought the new front tire that I purchased from them home this evening and mounted it, and balanced it myself! Thank you for all the valuable advice. Very satisfying.
Congrats!!!! :thumb::thumb:
 

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I just used soap water (evidently NOT enough). After damaging the tire, I remembered all the tips I saw on tire changes like push the tire to center of the rim, use vegetable based lube...
Try laying the tire on asphalt in direct sunshine for a few hours on a hot day.. They'll really soften up and with real tire loob usually slip right on. It's amazing how much difference it makes. (ie: - difference between sweating/cussing/throwing tools and getting done quick, feeling like a tire-changing hero and having a beer) :cheers:
 

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Try laying the tire on asphalt in direct sunshine for a few hours on a hot day....usually slip right on....
ABSOLUTELY GREAT advice, dd!
 

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You have never changed a tire until you change a Dunlop Elite III on a GL1800 Goldwing.

The key is to get good tire lube. Watch the videos. Watch them again.
First, put the tire out on an asphalt driveway for an hour. This subdues even the meanest tires.

If you can't do that, make a little cardboard box and use a hair dryer. Or, stick a 100 watt incandescent bulb in there and come back in six hours.

We have a No-Mar changer. Even with that, it's all about technique.
 

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Good tire stand, good dedicated lube, good tire irons, bead buddys and this tool.... works great....at least it does on my DS wheels. Havent tried it yet on the bigger bikes but think it should work. I bought every size axle rod they make.

http://www.bajanopinch.com
 

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Another way to warm the new tires before installation is to park your car in the sun, roll up the windows, and put your new motorcycle tires on the dashboard for an hour or so.
 

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My hat is off to the guys who do road side tire changes in remote sweltering jungles/deserts etc.
I guess you get good at it after a while. I still struggle in the comfort of my garage....with cold brewskies close at hand.
 

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