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The one thing that is preventing me from modding my seat is the fear that getting the cover back on would be very difficult. Is that the case or is it pretty simple?
 

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I was talking about the discomfortable seat, to a fellow rider who had never seen a Versys before (not that many around here), he looked at the bike and said something like: "Maybe the guy who drew the seat just followed the lines of the bike, never giving a thought about confort"...

Maybe he's right...
Could not agree more! Kinda like the HD guys...Its all about the looks!
 

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Discussion Starter #23
The one thing that is preventing me from modding my seat is the fear that getting the cover back on would be very difficult. Is that the case or is it pretty simple?
Simple. Just have a decent staple gun with short staples handy.
 

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I hope this is easy to do.... I'm afraid too about to put the stapples again. I'm really worry that regular staples that are used to fold paper get bend when you try to put them in the plastic base of the seat. The last resource would be to use shoe glue ... but I would not want to use it!
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Kurt,
No, do not use regular paper staples, or shoe glue! :) You need a heavy duty staple gun like this one...



Better yet if you have access to an electric or pneumatic upholstery stapler, but those aren't completely necessary. The above type of staple gun will do just fine.

And you should also get short staples. These staple guns are made to be used on wood. A regular paper stapler will not be enough to get through the plastic seat pan.

Eric
 

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Hmmm... Those things are difficult to get here in Peru, believe it or not... I better buy one in Amazon to do the right job, I don't want to mess with my seat cover!:nono:
Thanks for your support.
 

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I agree about the looks thing. When you look at the versys seat, it looks like a good design. It has a slight rest for the lower backside of the driver, it has a wide seating area, and the passenger has a hump in the front area to keep from sliding forward, and overall it has good padding depth... but it doesn't actually WORK lol
 

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seat cover

when i modded my seat i found my staple gun didn't have enough power to drive the staples. so i went to Lowe's home center and bough some short screws. i think they were 3/8" long. a little close to coming through the cover but worked great and when i needed to re-adjust it was faster. i used a cordless drill to drive them but used a hand screw driver to seat them. stop when they just make contact with the seat cover. they had a sharp point and went right into the plastic base.
 

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If you don't have access to a staple gun, hot glue and several small temporary clamps can be made to work. I have done this on several vintage motorcycle seats that had metal seat pans. It worked fine.
 

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I tested an F800GS, that seat made the Versys seat feel good by comparison.
I agree. I test rode an F800GS as well. I was squirming on the seat and trying to unbunch my jeans before I was even out of the parking lot.

Thanks for the write up. I was never sure about the stapling the cover back on bit. I'm going to giver it shot when I get a chance.

I have a small suggestion on how to get some of the forward slope out of the seat. There's a 'tab' on the underside of the seat pan that goes into the metal 'loop' at the base of the gas tank. When you install the seat, put that 'tab' on top of the 'loop' instead of into it. Because the seat pan is plastic, you can flex it a bit and it will still lock in at the back as it was designed to. I tried that last year after I bought the bike and it made a huge difference as far as the forward slope goes.
 

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Figured I'd copy this into the appropriate forum, as I previously submitted it as a reply in the "Performance Mods" forum in a Corbin Seat thread. Probably more relevant here. I hope it helps those having issues with the stock seat. Apologies if this is long-winded, but I'm having great success with it so far.

As most of us know, the biggest problem with the stock seat is the downward slope and the elevated tailbone section. I did some surgery on mine to level out the tailbone area, give it a little bit of a cup / bowl shape, and padded up the fore section with small cuts of firm camping mattress pad glued to the front half of the seat pan.


The primary pressure point near the tailbone / upper butt area has been relaxed / removed, and the seating pressure is now spread over a much larger area of the buttocks. The density of the stock seat foam is adequate once you get it shaped right.

Here's a pic with the cover on:


The stock cover fits fine. It is stretchy. The only part of the modification you will notice visually when you put the cover back on is the small forward section of the pillion seat that I carved back and flattened (vertically) a bit. I don't think it looks bad, plus it gives me a "locked in" feeling in the seat. It touches the lower back, upper pelvis area and probably provides just a bit more seating room. Feels great.

A few tips: Careful pulling the stock staples out. Wiggle them up with a small screwdriver and then use pliers to yank them out. You can stop pulling staples about an inch or two aft the seam in the seat, then peel the cover back. They put a TON of staples in that thing. I only replaced about half the staples that were there to begin with, which is more than enough. The "driver's" foam section lifts right out. Don't remove the passenger / pillion foam, just carve it right there on the pan. Put on a particle mask!!

For the rider's seat, draw a line about 6 to 8 inches in from the rear of the seat, on top. Then slowly carve from the rear to the front, back and forth with the 2" drum sander (or other abrasive device) The idea is to remove the upward lip on the rear part of the seat, along the same plane where you drew the line. Don't take too much foam away at first, but also don't worry about the foam being too thin. There's plenty of foam there.

The blue foam camping pad squares are self explanatory. I used a dab of hot glue to secure them to the pan. Cut to size and put them on the forward half of the pan. None on the rear. Staple cover back in place, use short staples. I think mine were 6mm but I can't remember. The staples were my only expense here... about $3.00.

Ride report: I got about 1 hour and 45 minutes on it after work today. I set out with the intent of being mindful of the seat. Typically, after less than an hour, my arse begins to feel the burn. When I returned home I realized that the seat never crossed my mind the entire ride. I was enjoying the beautiful weather and the pleasant NC spring scenery. I'd highly recommend giving this a shot before dropping big bread on a new seat. If it works for you half as well as it felt for me today, you will consider it a major success. Also, there is no sliding forward anymore at all. No more "front wedgies". I'm loving it and can't wait till I have the time for a 5 or 6 hour day in the NC mountains!!

Good luck!
Eric
I am hoping to get some lowering affect out of carving off some of the padding of my original seat. I would feel a lot more comfortable if I could set a inch or so lower and could touch the ground flat footed. I dropped my bike once when I rode over a small curb it was only about 2 inches tall. But it was enough that I could not touch the ground and I ended up dropping my bike. Lucky I didn’t damage anything and a couple men came over and helped me lift the bike back up. Is there any utube videos out that show how to do this. I am worried about ruining my seat
 

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I used Motowerk lowering kit and did my seat mod, you will not gain , just doing the seat. You can try setting the rebound and damping , but best bang for your buck is the lowering kit.. I posted in this thread @ post 28 and again at post 31;

 

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Yes I have watched the Utube video on lowering the Versys by changing the unlink and the bottom of the rear shock. But the mechanics I talked to said you have to lower the front the same amount. By having some one take apart the front forks and rebuild them to match the lowering of the rear because if you don’t it will upset the handling of the motorcycle in the turns.And you will need to have that done by a professional front forks building expert. And you are all so going to have that much less ground clearance under your motor and foot pegs will drag sooner in the twisting curves. And you will all so have to modify your kick stand and center stand if you have one. So I can not decide what the best way to go is. So for now I am just going to hold off on the lower and listening to what everyone has to say about it. Can you tell me where you bought the part that you switch out on the bottom of your rear shock and how many inches it lowered the seat hight on your Versys 650. And how and who you got to reword your front forks to match up with the rear??? I am also kicking around the idea of putting on shorter height tires front and rear. If I can find a set that would fit my rims good I know that will make the speedo read wrong but I use my GPS for my speed anyway so that’s not a problem for me. I also want to put a larger sprocket on the rear tire to make firs gear lower for making slow speed upturns and not having to slip the clutch so much to roll a sharp turn. I like the high ratio first gear for pulling out into traffic and not having to shift to second so soon. But first gear is to tall for me in tight off road trails and Flippin a U turn. I have to pull in the clutch and slip it in order to make a tight u turn. That can’t be good for the clutch and it’s also irritating to me.Shorter tires just might eliminate both problems at once and I can keep my bike stock. Sorry about the long post I should have shut up a long time ago. Ride to live and live to ride 👍🏁🏁👍☝🏆🥇👏👏
 

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But the mechanics I talked to said you have to lower the front the same amount. By having some one take apart the front forks and rebuild them to match the lowering of the rear because if you don’t it will upset the handling of the motorcycle in the turns.And you will need to have that done by a professional front forks building expert.
NOT true.

To "lower" the front end you SIMPLY move your forks HIGHER in the triple clamps by a similar amount, and - YES - the side-stand should be shortened.

To RAISE the forks requires the bike be supported from above so it (the bike) doesn't go straight DOWN as you loosen the triple-clamp bolts.
 
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