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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well it started out with a ride with a guy I occasionally ride with that had the 5 watt Denali lights on his forks were the reflectors had been mounted. I bought the 10 watt D2.0 with the dimmer, got the mounting kit for the forks, went home then my recent oops when my signal light went through the plastic gave me some doubt about the wisdom of mounting here. So back they went, unfortunately Twisted Throttle Canada and the USA were out of stock of SW-Motech Light Mount - Black - NSW.08.518.10000/B, back ordered from Italy, expected mid October which translates November. Just copied today again:
SW-MOTECH HAWK Light Mount Set for Kawasaki Versys 650 LT & ABS '15-'17 SKU: NSW.08.518.10000.B
Out of stock, more on the way! Order now for fastest delivery.

So I thought of welding some stainless brackets on the bike directly, if you ever used good quality stainless 316 or similar you know you need cobalt drill bits, also lots of protection as I didn't want to tear everything off the bike, on top of that, some real funky plastic with irregular shapes which would need much fitting to get it right. So 3 days after spending a fortune on 2 lights and a dimmer, I go and get some stainless welding rod, so bike is all apart by now , on the lift backwards, yup that was fun. So I have stainless , aluminum angle, aluminum channel, aluminum flat bar. Several welded stainless Z brackets, many stainless military tie down brackets that didn't pass inspection and were destined to be melted.

So late Monday I was feeling a little chicken, brain storm hit me as every place and source that I tried for the SW Motech was out of stock on back order. I then remembered that was the case with the chain I bought from a online Canadian distributor called FortNine, they had my chain when all others were out of stock. Yup they had the Versys SW Motech bracket in stock. That was Monday Sept. 18 received it free shipping Sept.22. The price was $10 more the the Denali mounting on the forks, I can say the Denali mounting compared to the SW Motech is 300% over priced for what you get, or putting it another way, SW Motech should be charging 300% more.

So preliminary set up is my right light has the wide angle lens in, great if you are doing off road, as everything almost 75' right is illuminated, however long range is compromised. I intend to change the right back to a spot, as I have found, a early view of deer at the side of the road gives you an slight edge to slow down, by the time my wide angle right would illuminate deer, at 80 KM/HR , well you know the answer.

So I thought I would post what I have so far. Additional pictures to come on a rainy day.
As you can see not much real estate left








This is the start of the mounting, extremely well made, designed to go together , no worries!




Unfortunately some photos of the completed install and wiring got deleted in the upload, so this winter I will take more.
Denali on 50% setting


Denali at 100% Also all photos are with the bike running, the city lights are phillips t10 LED lights with over 500 hours on them.


Denali at 100% and low beam 2400 lumen led headlight, it works but it will go this winter, don't like the light pattern.




Just added my switch for high beam and my Oxford controller, both attached to my Moto Werk mirror extender / mirror , what appears as damage on the extender is glue from my Innovv camera on/ off switch, now located on the Garmin ball mount.
You will notice a round disc with a white center on the Garmin mount, that is my Innovv camera switch, not pretty , quick install after I tried moving it, used some silicone as is obvious, functional not pretty.
Close up of the Denali what is now high beam , green on indicates high beam. I don't like buying things extra when a simple modification produces the same effect. To get what I have, I would have needed to buy a 3 position switch for $50 and stick my 2 position in the extra parts bin with the included relay, no thanks!!
 

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You can just wire those directly to your high beam lead to the headlight for operation with existing high beam switch on handlebars. I run 40W aux. LED lights this way. Illumination is fantastic, better than my car.
 

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You can just wire those directly to your high beam lead to the headlight for operation with existing high beam switch on handlebars. I run 40W aux. LED lights this way. Illumination is fantastic, better than my car.


You could, if you rode an HD or your motto was "good enough for posing at the coffee shop". Electrical work is easy to underestimate and do poorly. That is preparing for failure. Don't know about you folks, but I hate being stuck at the side of the road.

Doing electrical work well is an art form, especially on vehicles. There are many factors to consider. It is nice to see it done well for a change. Thanks for sharing @onewizard!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Wiring 101

I didn't mean to have this as a discussion thread, but now that we have a few posts, I realize that I left some very important detail out. First there is very little when it comes to AC or DC power that eludes me, one thing, I no longer am bothered to etch my own board and design a circuit, as has been mentioned several times by me, I specialize in large inverters , when I say large 2.5 megawatts which is 2,500,000 watts . These inverters can be AC to AC but typically they are AC to DC then inverted to high frequency. So the reason I don't bother making stuff / etching boards is I can buy a PWM module ( pulse width modulated) for $10.

So back on track here, the Denali is plug and play, the dimming module goes where the relay module was plugged in. That is correct, I have a harness with a single pole relay sitting in my parts bin. The kit comes with a single pole waterproof switch, you can also get a optional three position switch, off; low; high. Since I don't like buying stuff when I can modify stuff, that 3 position switch is still at Denali, don't know if Twisted Throttle carries it or not.

So this is how and why I went that way. I have a Osram 65 watt in my high beam, I wanted options of running my Denali on high beam during the day because when I was out with trafman and I was leading, I noticed how the bike stood out / was framed by the 5 watt Denali lights.

So I wanted the ability to run the Denali on low beam immediately when the key was turned on, anyone following my posts would know I have a series regulator and use my brake light to trigger my headlight relay, the day I was riding he noticed my headlight wasn't on for 15 minutes, because I started the bike and never touched the brake for 15 min.. So that was the second reason to run the Denali on low beam automatically. So the next thing was I wanted to be able to run the Denali on high beam , independent of the OEM high beam with the Osram in it.

So I reversed the order on the switch setting wiring plug of the Denali, released two pins and plugged them back in in reverse order, now the included switch turns on high beam, the aux. wire that sticks out that was meant to go to the high beam is connected to my switched power distribution and turns on low beam automatically, amongst that wiring nightmare in the front of the bike>:), well you will notice wire tags on the relays #1 and #2, that is my signal lights for the bark busters, everything is actually marked or has coloured phasing tape on it indicating polarity.

Now if someone wanted what I have but also wanted the option of having the OEM high beam or the Denali switch , turn on Denali high, this could be accomplished by adding a Diode. Personnaly I like it the way it is, my Denali switch is stuck to the side of my Oxford grip heater controller, so the switch is directly above the passing switch / OEM High beam switch.

Plus the way it is now wired, the illuminated Denali switch is green on high. Like I said, I meant to include this information but was a bit hasty getting the post up, the reason to include this today is because any member here could change this configuration using a jewelers screwdriver and following some instruction.


One more FYI, the low beam LED is 2400 lumen, it has a driver built in with a fan integral to it, since the retaining spring is part of the cowling by Kawasaki, I removed the OEM retainer and put it in a zip lock bag. As described earlier I ran the LED in the housing for 6 hours , something I failed to disclose is a continuous rating for motors and any other electrical device is 2 hours. so after 6 hours I approved the set up for installing into my bike, I fully expected it to fail as the fan is using the area of the cowling for cooling, as the dust boot is holding the whole assembly into the cowling.

I left my Osram bulb in high beam, figuring if the low beam failed, I had high and the Denali to get home with.

So before I buy anything for Low beam , I am going to wait and see, new Led headlight conversions with the remote driver and better beam spread. And yes, I am up to speed on everything that is available to date. Gigitt did a posting way back and the light pattern looks good, however more options of colour temperature and better beam patterns are coming out as we speak, plus the prices are dropping and eventually there will be plug and play for the Versys.
If there is interest I can post the colour codes of the Denali and explain where to move the wire pins to, involves moving two wires. To provide photos may need to wait until the snow gets here.


Denali High Beam Switch and Oxford Controller
Just updated my original post with these photos. If someone wants the colour code to duplicate my connection. So instructions say to remove the relay and plug in the Data Dim module.The connector on the end of the switch has a blue wire with a bullet female connector, a red wire a black wire and a yellow wire. Take a jewelers slot screwdriver and release the pins attached to the yellow and bullet blue. They get swapped, yellow in the location that was blue and blue into the former yellow location in the plug.Blue bullet and white go to a switched source such as city lights or if you already have a 12volt power outlet up front that is switched that will work.

I have a second source of switched power up front and connected the red wire that has its own fuse to that source. Black wire is ground and there is a grounded frame connection in two places up front .If you have a auxiliary circuit provided by Kawasaki up front and you are using it for USB charging or other non essential load you could connect the red to that. A couple things to keep in mind, I wire tied the Denali fuse holder to the brace closest to the shocks so if a fuse blew I would have access. It comes with a 10 amp fuse ( I think that is excessive and have installed a 7.5 amp fuse, 5 amp being the next one could cause a nuisance fuse failure being it is close to full load current of 3.2 amp at 14.2 VDC), should you have a light smashed off the bike and a short occurs you could just change the 5 amp auxiliary fuse.

This is where I need to explain fuse co-ordination and what you shouldn't connect to, and options to use if you don't have the auxiliary relay and don't want to spend the $20 to $30 to get one. Never connect to the existing main high low beam light, you have a mechanical / electrical failure of the Denali could leave you in the dark.So the only safe option is the city light/brake light horn fuse of 10 amp, you should reduce the fuse size for the Denali to 7.5 amp. So to explain fuse co-ordination, even though the headlights have a 15 amp fuse, the normal low beam is around 4 to 5 amp continuous , with a 10 amp fuse in the denali, a sudden short would not only tyake out the Denali 10 amp but it likely would blow the 15 amp fuse. Reducing the fuse size to 7.5 amp in the Denali would be a safer choice if you wish to use the headlight circuit. The second reason I steer clear of using the headlight circuit is there have been stator failures which impact the headlight relay, there have been several members with no headlight due to stator failure, yes eventually you will be walking, however a few of those were headlight relay only failure. That is why either a separate power source and using city lights to trigger or your auxiliary circuit to trigger is a much better option.
 

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You could, if you rode an HD or your motto was "good enough for posing at the coffee shop". Electrical work is easy to underestimate and do poorly. That is preparing for failure. Don't know about you folks, but I hate being stuck at the side of the road.

Doing electrical work well is an art form, especially on vehicles. There are many factors to consider. It is nice to see it done well for a change. Thanks for sharing @onewizard!
I am a former electronic engineering technologist who has since updated his education and moved to software development. I made the following post as the draw of the LED aux lights is low, well within specs of the high beam circuit, and allows you to use the same high beam switch. One wizard has a more elaborate method with more options however my method will work without frying anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Information missing / Current / Voltage

I am a former electronic engineering technologist who has since updated his education and moved to software development. I made the following post as the draw of the LED aux lights is low, well within specs of the high beam circuit, and allows you to use the same high beam switch. One wizard has a more elaborate method with more options however my method will work without frying anything.
Nice to have someone with your expertise on this forum. I failed to mention the total 20 watts i.e. 2X 10 watts= 20 watts is possible to calculate. Say the 10 watt LED at 14.2 VDC is 10 divided by 14.2 VDC= 0.704 or 704 milliamp, . at 12 VDC it is 10 divided by 12 volts = 0.833 amps or 803 milliamp. As you can see the LED driver has a range generally of 9 to 30 VDC ( Denali) , the higher the voltage the lower the current.

Now let us look at incandescent, I have a much earlier post, one thing that many misunderstand is all incandescent bulbs designed for automotive use are rated at 12VDC, not 12.9 not 14.2 but 12 VDC. Incadescent the higher the voltage the greater the wattage, yes there is a lumen increase but in reality the lumens per watt of a good LED is about 300% of that of a good incandescent halogen lamp, or another way is the current per watt of a good LED compared to incandescent is 33% of incandescent. So with my Denali total 20 watts plus my cyclops LED added together the current / wattage == less than the Osram low beam current before I changed it.

The first thing I noticed was my LED voltage indicator was having the orange led flashing at a much more rapid rate, which indicated that my Series CompuFire regulator was switching the SCR's at a much higher rate to maintain voltage at 14.2 VDC.
 

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I am a former electronic engineering technologist who has since updated his education and moved to software development. I made the following post as the draw of the LED aux lights is low, well within specs of the high beam circuit, and allows you to use the same high beam switch. One wizard has a more elaborate method with more options however my method will work without frying anything.


As a retired Aircraft Maintenance Technician, past Rally, SOLO 2, SOLO 1 car builder, Digital Office Equipment Technician, and now computer trainer, I didn't intend to piss in your {Canadian Thanksgiving weekend} [adult beverage of choice].

I have seen cars burn to the ground due to crap wiring (when the gas tank goes, it is nothing like in the movies, but still scary!). I no longer assume that anybody knows anything. Using the high beam wiring to trigger a relay would be safe, even if the high beam bulb has been replaced with a 100W bulb. But adding the ~40W draw of LED driving lights to that circuit would be a recipe for darkness - probably at the worst moment. I have learned to never assume, as someone on the Internet will find a way to fall short of your lowest expectation.

My point is, I just wanted to express my appreciation for the effort that @onewizard went through to document for us his tidy installation, that should be functional for years to come. And I tried to inject a little humour as well.

Sorry if that wasn't evident,
Dave
 

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I want to do this add-on, but I am lost with the wiring...

Can someone simplify it by saying exactly what relay is needed, what switch, and what circuit triggers the relay?

What works the best for visibility in daylight? I prefer not to use high beams in day, so LED's on with low beam / engine running? Any better scenario?

So, the SW Motech plate is good gear? The OEM uses rubber isolation on their mount. Is vibration an issue?

Rmpl
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I want to do this add-on, but I am lost with the wiring...

Can someone simplify it by saying exactly what relay is needed, what switch, and what circuit triggers the relay?

What works the best for visibility in daylight? I prefer not to use high beams in day, so LED's on with low beam / engine running? Any better scenario?

So, the SW Motech plate is good gear? The OEM uses rubber isolation on their mount. Is vibration an issue?

Rmpl
Both questions pertain to the original install, so I will comment. In the future it is best to describe the make, year and model of your bike, I was able to find that you have a 2016 V1000.

FYI full instruction are included with the Denali lights, giving several options with or without the dimmer module, I have described what modifications I made at no extra cost using the existing original parts purchased, the only left over part is the relay, since I have the dimming module.
If you want just the Denali lights, they are plug and play. It comes with a relay and waterproof switch. Dual intensity is a separate module.


I can take a few more pictures of my switch set up but anything internal will wait until winter, not taking anything apart unless my low beam LED fails.

The SW Motech mount is sold out USA and Canada at Twisted Throttle, this is a model specific mount, the same mount for Triumph and Yamaha are also sold out at Twisted Throttle and FortNine. What does that say. This is a extremely well designed mount that can be removed and sold separately if you sell the bike. Your V1000 is a different part number SKU: NSW.08.722.10000.B also sold out.

You need to describe how you want it to work, do you want dual intensity?
From there you need to state if you want basically what I have. I have retained my high beam incandescent bulb and have 8 more bulbs which I am considering selling for $5 each plus shipping, to make it worth while it would need to be 2 or multiples of two.
I don't want my Denali lights on full intensity controlled by my high beam light.
Your V1000 has a auxiliary circuit built in, requiring you to buy a relay from Kawasaki, there are alternatives however all info is found within this forum.
http://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/74-how-forum/77154-fuzing-relay-power-outlet-install-2015-earlier.html?highlight=relays see post 43

You post exactly want you want, what you have so far and we will go from there. very simple for me, not so for many others. If it is electrically/ electronically possible, I will eventually find a way, and then explain it in a way everyone can understand,>:) sometimes it takes several:eek: tries
 

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I have the Denali D2's. I used the high beam as the signal to trigger the D2's to 100% but was getting funny pulsing because if the minor variances in the voltage on the bike. The D2 controller was too sensitive for the variances. So to fix the problem, I added a simple relay so the High beam now triggers the relay to send the signal to the D2's. Everything is soldered so I don't expect any failures and its been working flawlessly.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Denali High Beam Switch and Oxford Controller

Just updated my original post with these photos. If someone wants the colour code to duplicate my connection. So instructions say to remove the relay and plug in the Data Dim module.The connector on the end of the switch has a blue wire with a bullet female connector, a red wire a black wire and a yellow wire. Take a jewelers slot screwdriver and release the pins attached to the yellow and bullet blue. They get swapped, yellow in the location that was blue and blue into the former yellow location in the plug.Blue bullet and white go to a switched source such as city lights or if you already have a 12volt power outlet up front that is switched that will work.

I have a second source of switched power up front and connected the red wire that has its own fuse to that source. Black wire is ground and there is a grounded frame connection in two places up front .If you have a auxiliary circuit provided by Kawasaki up front and you are using it for USB charging or other non essential load you could connect the red to that. A couple things to keep in mind, I wire tied the Denali fuse holder to the brace closest to the shocks so if a fuse blew I would have access. It comes with a 10 amp fuse ( I think that is excessive and have installed a 7.5 amp fuse, 5 amp being the next one could cause a nuisance fuse failure being it is close to full load current of 3.2 amp at 14.2 VDC), should you have a light smashed off the bike and a short occurs you could just change the 5 amp auxiliary fuse.

This is where I need to explain fuse co-ordination and what you shouldn't connect to, and options to use if you don't have the auxiliary relay and don't want to spend the $20 to $30 to get one. Never connect to the existing main high low beam light, you have a mechanical / electrical failure of the Denali could leave you in the dark.So the only safe option is the city light/brake light horn fuse of 10 amp, you should reduce the fuse size for the Denali to 7.5 amp. So to explain fuse co-ordination, even though the headlights have a 15 amp fuse, the normal low beam is around 4 to 5 amp continuous , with a 10 amp fuse in the denali, a sudden short would not only tyake out the Denali 10 amp but it likely would blow the 15 amp fuse. Reducing the fuse size to 7.5 amp in the Denali would be a safer choice if you wish to use the headlight circuit. The second reason I steer clear of using the headlight circuit is there have been stator failures which impact the headlight relay, there have been several members with no headlight due to stator failure, yes eventually you will be walking, however a few of those were headlight relay only failure. That is why either a separate power source and using city lights to trigger or your auxiliary circuit to trigger is a much better option.
 

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...What works the best for visibility in daylight? I prefer not to use high beams in day, so LED's on with low beam / engine running? Any better scenario?...
I have DENALI DMs, and use them as additional day and night running lights, so people see me. ON when the key is ON. I TRY to avoid riding after dark (critters AND cages...)!
 

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The SW Motech mount is sold out USA and Canada at Twisted Throttle <snip> Your V1000 is a different part number SKU: NSW.08.722.10000.B also sold out.
Looks like I first need to find the mount...

I am not up on motorcycle light -v- safety theory, but my knee-jerk post above was thinking LED aftermarket lights on when engine is on, but no need for full 100% power, so I guess a dual-intensity module would be best. Then a switch to turn on 100% LED power that is not connected at all to the headlight high beam, giving me control of when it is on 100% or not.

But before anyone goes out of their way to figure my uses out electrically, let me get the mount first. Then I will order lights based on recommendations of adding the dual-intensity option. I will also research other LED light products as I search out the mount.

Thanks!

Rmpl
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Looks like I first need to find the mount...

I am not up on motorcycle light -v- safety theory, but my knee-jerk post above was thinking LED aftermarket lights on when engine is on, but no need for full 100% power, so I guess a dual-intensity module would be best. Then a switch to turn on 100% LED power that is not connected at all to the headlight high beam, giving me control of when it is on 100% or not.

But before anyone goes out of their way to figure my uses out electrically, let me get the mount first. Then I will order lights based on recommendations of adding the dual-intensity option. I will also research other LED light products as I search out the mount.

Thanks!

Rmpl
Amazing , first time what I said and what you want, matches. Not always is it what I think and what I say, clear to anybody but me, sometimes it isn't even clear to me . :eek:
 

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I was unable to find the SW bike-specific mount over the last 1.5 months, so I got the Denali bike-specific mount. The metal is thicker bar stock on the Denali mount than the sheet metal SW mount, but yeah, too much $$$ for just bent & powder-coated bar steel and some bushings & bolts.

I am thinking of buying the Denali D4 2.0 TriOptic lights instead of the D2 2.0 lights, as the D4 has both a spot beam and flood in each light lens, as well as comes with a spot only lens if the flood is not wanted. They are $50 more. I was hoping I would find them ON SALE during Black Friday (Thanksgiving sales), but no luck, still full price.

In hindsight, would you stay with the D2's or go with the D4's?

Also, to get switch functionality with dimming, it looks like I need to buy BOTH the DataDim controller ($50) plus the 3-way switch ($35). Price adds up quick! Sure wish they would go on sale soon!

Rmpl
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I was unable to find the SW bike-specific mount over the last 1.5 months, so I got the Denali bike-specific mount. The metal is thicker bar stock on the Denali mount than the sheet metal SW mount, but yeah, too much $$$ for just bent & powder-coated bar steel and some bushings & bolts.

I am thinking of buying the Denali D4 2.0 TriOptic lights instead of the D2 2.0 lights, as the D4 has both a spot beam and flood in each light lens, as well as comes with a spot only lens if the flood is not wanted. They are $50 more. I was hoping I would find them ON SALE during Black Friday (Thanksgiving sales), but no luck, still full price.

In hindsight, would you stay with the D2's or go with the D4's?

Also, to get switch functionality with dimming, it looks like I need to buy BOTH the DataDim controller ($50) plus the 3-way switch ($35). Price adds up quick! Sure wish they would go on sale soon!

Rmpl
First I wouldn't call the SW Motech mount sheet metal, as this is formed by a press, not something I would attempt to bend using a brake. Yes I found all sources out of stock, then I remembered I had the same problem with the chain I wanted which was in stock a FortNine in Canada, l then did a search, they had it in stock and the same price, originally I looked at welding my own mount out of stainless steel, for the price I paid, I wouldn't turn my welder on. As to your comment about spot and flood, the text is a bit misleading for the D2, as that was stated for the D2, it came with a separate flood lens, take the spot out and install the flood, I had a flood on my right light, this reduced the distance and I removed it and re-installed the spot, as I am looking into the right side ditch as a early warning for deer and moose, using the flood, by the time I am in range it is too late. The spot I light up a good 160 meters , just enough time to brake or maneuver . The D4 is double the power with both spot and wide angle lenses incorporated into one.
As to a separate 3 way switch, I don't mind when extra parts are included such as when I got my bark busters, mounting expansion bolts if needed, however I don't like when perfectly good parts are included but for my purpose I need to buy a different part. I have the original switch and use it for high beam, others have mentioned that the existing OEM high beam could be used, I disaggree, as I can't leave my high beam on when opposing traffic exists, plus my high beam is 65 plus watts or over 3 times the load of the D2 led lights. I wired my data dim to my switched power for low beam, I then used the included switch for high beam. I have mentioned how to switch the pins in the plug and play harness to do this, no extra cost and I would never go back to any other way, one plus is I can just key on, without starting the bike, light up everything in front of me at 20 watts total, possibly to assist someone with a flat tire.

The switch is stuck to my Oxford heat controller, in this photo it is on which is Denali D2 high beam


See How To for photo
https://www.kawasakiversys.com/forums/74-how-forum/204241-denali-2-0-d2-trioptic-led-light-kit-datadim-technology-sw-motech-mounting.html
 

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Thanks, Onewizard! I am waiting to see if the Denali's go on sale Monday for Cyber Monday... Keep fingers crossed!

Rmpl
 

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Hey onewizard --

I am curious, any guesses on how the "DataDim" is actually implemented electronically?

My guess would be that the lights get full intensity with 12v on the "data" wire for the light pods. This would make the the "DataDim" module just a DPST relay, while the standard relay is SPST that ties power to data for the pod. What do you think? Sound plausible?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey onewizard --

I am curious, any guesses on how the "DataDim" is actually implemented electronically?

My guess would be that the lights get full intensity with 12v on the "data" wire for the light pods. This would make the the "DataDim" module just a DPST relay, while the standard relay is SPST that ties power to data for the pod. What do you think? Sound plausible?
I have that module and if I was really curious I would measure the VDC one day, maybe next time I am out. As to how it is done, it needs to be voltage, most LED nowadays use a driver, many are rated 9 to 32 volts. I reconfigured my plug and play wiring, as I didn't want a second switch, plus the switch supplied is waterproof and illuminated . My purpose of buying was three fold, mainly daytime visibility but equally for night time early warning of deer and moose, have the long range lens in and aimed one center of road and second one in the ditch as far ahead as is possible. The third reason is with my series regulator my headlight is triggered by the brake switch, I have had cases where I stopped briefly then started and never used the brake for several miles during daylight, yes no headlight. During the day my Denali are on high, in fact 98% of the time they are on high. They also come on with my auxiliary relay so I have low/ high, beam immediately when keying on.
 

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I have that module and if I was really curious I would measure the VDC one day, maybe next time I am out.
If you happen to do this, please give me a shout! I am looking into getting some Denali light pods set up in a more custom configuration (i.e. not using their included harness or relay modules... I'll be building my own harness) and so it will help to know how the "dim" signal wire is used in their stock harness.

Of course I will also test one of the pods, but I don't have one on the bench yet. I'll update here if I figure it out before you :)
 
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