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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Background: Last September I installed new JT sprockets (stock size, rubber front) and a new DID 520 ZVMX chain. This chain is rated for 1000cc and up bikes, it is excessively strong for a 650! Chain slack was set on the loose side as I’ve found the factory spec is too tight to prevent binding. Chain alignment was set with an alignment tool, not the factory markings that are off. I have an automatic chain oiler installed and had been using 75w90 synthetic gear oil until this spring when I switched to heavy weight chain saw bar oil - it sticks to the moving chain better! I have about 11,000 km of all weather riding on these parts.

While preparing for a tire change, I was wiping down the chain and noticed that an X-ring was sticking out:


I said some bad words, then inspected closer. I’ve found that the inner link appears to be bent:


I (obviously) marked the damaged link with red paint so I can keep an eye on it until some new master links are delivered and I can replace the damaged links with ones left over from shortening the chain.

Has anyone seen this before? Any idea what might have caused it? I paid a premium for this chain in the hope it would last more than a year, so I’m rather disappointed to find this.

Thanks!
 

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2016 Versys 1000 CBF1000 VFR800
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Who knows, maybe so... you can squeeze that link back straight, but unfortunately the X ring is now missing and someday it will wear out..... maybe contact the supplier?
 

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Only way I can see that happening is if a nail or something similar got between the sprocket and chain-link --if a stone you would have a damaged tooth, and both sides would be bent. That would have taken several 1000 pounds to bend.
 
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...Only way I can see that happening is if a nail or something similar got between the sprocket and chain-link....
Wouldn't an occurrence like that put a "dent" into the tooth on the sprocket...?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wouldn't an occurrence like that put a "dent" into the tooth on the sprocket...?
I looked, but didn’t see any damage to the rear sprocket. Had a quick look at the front sprocket and also nothing, other than it is wearing faster than expected. Not an issue as they are $11 for a JT rubber sprocket.
 

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I looked, but didn’t see any damage to the rear sprocket. Had a quick look at the front sprocket and also nothing, other than it is wearing faster than expected. Not an issue as they are $11 for a JT rubber sprocket.
You have a part number and source?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Looking closely at the inner link, left side, there is clear deformation (outwards) of the link. Like onewizard said, nail, small screw, etc. between link and left side of sprocket - dang, what are the chances of that happening? BTW, great picture and you sure keep a clean chain!
Right? I was astounded when I saw that.

Thanks! As I mentioned previously, I have an onboard automatic chain oiler that is currently dispensing heavy weight chain saw bar oil. The pics were taken after quickly wiping down the chain with a clean dry rag. I have ridden about 200km on country roads, highways and gravel since the pics were taken and the chain looks the same - clean and wet with oil.
 

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I’ve just fitted a automatic chain oiler and put the oil that came in the kit (scottoiler) is it just transmission oil? I did think of using chainsaw oil but wasn’t sure if it would pull through the automatic oiler ok?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There is nothing wrong with the Scottoiler oil. I’ve used it in the past. I’m using chainsaw bar oil because it won’t fling off as easily as other oils - it is designed for cleaning and lubricating high speed chains. Unlike gear oil, engine oil, or other industrial chain lubricants.
Finding a liquid chain lubricant that is heavy enough to withstand the loads out chains are under, can resist being washed off by rain or road spray, and can flow in cold temps, but won’t flow too much when hot has been challenging. WD-40 seemed like it might be a good option, but I found it was too thin and separated in the reservoir (the packaging does say to shake before use), as did a moly chain lube. I now only use WD-40 as a chain cleaner and as a winter corrosion preventative spray for the entire bike.

I even tried a soy based ‘eco-friendly’ oil for a while, but found it wasn’t nearly as good as advertised, while leaving behind a thick black goo that solidified over time and resisted all cleaners.

Lubes for automatic oilers can be challenging, especially since so few use them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Following up on this chain. I now have about 16,000 km on the chain and sprockets. The past couple months has seen about 80 km of highway commuting 5 days a week, plus other riding that includes gravel side roads.

The chain now has multiple stiff links and is chewing up and spitting out the “Z” rings. I’ve noticed a vibration when under load, such as accelerating or cruising at speed on the highway. I originally thought it was tire balance, but now know is the chain dying.

I’m less than pleased with the life of this chain, especially considering the cost and supposed strength.

Time to shop for another chain and sprockets. There has to be something good out there, but what?…
 

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2017 Kawasaki Versys-x 300; 14/46 sprockets (stock);
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Thanks for keeping us updated. Hate to hear about your chain. Good luck with your search for a new chain.
 
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