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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if anyone else had this happen yet..

I went out this morning and gave my 09 Versys a wash. I didn't start it up before washing as I usually do, just wheeled it ot and began hosing.

When I was done, I tried to fire it up and go for a ride. No coughs, sputters, anything, just kept cranking over with no result.

I'm no professional mechanic, but I do know my way around a bike. I figured at first, its just being cold blooded as it was pretty chilly this morning in NS, but as there was no sign of it trying to start at all. It acted like there was no fire at all.

Frustrated, I figured, I'd check for spark. Took fairings, tank, etc etc off to get at the plugs and look things over from the top, no spark at all.. in either plug. Hmmmmmmmm. Weird, it ran right up until last weekend when I put it away without a hitch.

I then decided to peek at the manual to see if there were any suggestions and it was then that I found out how to read the codes. 2 long flashes and 1 short, meaning it is a Crankshaft sensor failure. Apparently when one of these sensors fails, it shuts down the fuel and ignition systems, explaining my dilema. :eek:

It is a holiday today, but I'm going to give my local Kawi dealer a call tomorrow to fix it as it should be all under warranty still. I bought the bike June 30, 2009 and it has (sadly) less than 2000 kms on it!!!- It was on moving truck in storage for about 2 months.

Just wondering if anyone out there EVER heard of one of these going??? I know I never have. :dgi:
 

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Have you tried disconnecting the battery for awhile and then powering back up? It might have been a glitch that will go away once the memory is erased.
 

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nope never happenened to anybody else.

Where are you seeing 2 long and one short?

Most folks forget to check that red switch on the right hand controls every once in a while when they are having your symptoms.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Yeah,
I did it all. Disconnected the battery and reconnected after about 10 mins. No dice

When you connect a wire to the diagnostic wire under the seat and ground out to the battery, your bike's computer will tell you a fault code by flashing your little FI led under your speedo. - a series of long, followed by short flashes. There is a way to see what is wrong right now, and any past faults. Mine did 2 long one short for both instances- 2 1. Cross reference in the service manual (downloadable on here somewhere) and thats what the fault code is for... the crankshaft sensor. With this sensor failing, the ECU cannot detect the crankshaft position. Either a short or an open lead on this sensor will apparently make the bike's fuel and ignition system shut down until the fault is corrected:eek:
At least this is what I've deducted after a day's worth of research and wrenching

Yes, I even checked the red switch, the fuses, the 30A main fuse on the lower left of the bike and the kickstand switch before reading the code. I'm glad nobody else has had this problem and that is uncommon as it would be a huge pain in the ass to fix away from home. I guess I'm just the lucky one:stickpoke:
 

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I sure hope your dealer sorts this out for you.

I didn't know the bike had a way of comunicating diagnostics without plugging it into a seperate computer. that could be helpfull.
 

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You can test you crankshaft sensor at the 3-wire connector near the clutch release lever on the clutch housing behind plastic frame cover, and check your wiring and connector while you're at it.
Page 16-39 in Electrical chapter of the free 2007 repair manual:

Crankshaft Sensor Inspection-
•Disconnect the crankshaft sensor lead connector (Ignition Off)
•Set the hand tester to the × 100 Ω range and connect (+) lead to the black lead and (–) lead to the yellow lead in the connector.
Crankshaft Sensor Resistance: 376 ∼ 564 Ω
-If there is more resistance than the specified value, the coil has an open lead and must be replaced. Much less than this resistance means the coil is shorted, and must be replaced.
•Using the highest resistance range of the tester, measure the resistance between the crankshaft sensor leads and chassis ground.
-Any tester reading less than infinity (∞) indicates a short, necessitating replacement of the crankshaft sensor assembly.

Crankshaft Sensor Peak Voltage Inspection-
○Be sure the battery is fully charged.
○Using the peak voltage adapter [A] is a more reliable way to determine the condition of the crankshaft sensor
than crankshaft sensor internal resistancemeasurements.
•Disconnect the crankshaft sensor lead connector
•Set the hand tester to the × DC 10 V range, and connect it peak voltage adapter.
Peak Voltage Adapter: 57001-1415 Type: KEK-54-9-B
•Connect the black lead of the adapter to black lead and red lead to yellow lead in the crankshaft sensor connector.
•Turn the engine stop switch to run position.
•Turn the ignition switch ON.
•Pushing the starter button, turn the engine 4 ∼ 5 seconds with the transmission gear in neutral to measure the crankshaft sensor peak voltage.
•Repeat the measurement 5 or more times.
Crankshaft Sensor Peak Voltage- Standard: 1.9 V or more
-If the tester reading is not specified one, check the crankshaft sensor. (see Crankshaft Sensor Inspection).
 

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I'd let the bike thoroughly dry before I'd assume there was a bad sensor. Seeing as your problem developed immediately after washing the bike I'd want to make sure there wasn't any water in your electrical connectors.

Of course if water did infiltrate one of your electrical connectors you may have problems riding in the rain in the future unless you find and repair the water leaking connector.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I took apart the connector invader mentioned above yesterday. It was a bit damp so I sprayed WD 40 on both sides to disperse any water. I checked the resistance which, if I'm reading it right, is way too low and the sensor has shorted out.

I unhooked the battery overnight to double check, connected it this morning, no luck again. Same result.

I don't use a pressure washer to wash the bike, so I did not force water anywhere it would not have otherwise gone from a rainy ride.

It is not acceptable that Kawasaki should not replace this under warranty as I'm sure they intended this bike to be ridden some days in the wet!!!!! I will take it to the dealer to replace and fix the problem.

Now I just need to find someone with a truck!!
 

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You can test you crankshaft sensor at the 3-wire connector near the clutch release lever on the clutch housing behind plastic frame cover, and check your wiring and connector while you're at it.
Page 16-39 in Electrical chapter of the free 2007 repair manual:

(see Crankshaft Sensor Inspection).
INVADER-

You are BLOODY amazing!!!:thumb::thanx::yeahsmile:
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Well the local Kawi shop called today to tell me what has happened.
I feel shame due to the fact that my trusty Versys not working was a direct result of my and mine alone wrenching and farkle fitting. This will go down in the records as the first time in 24 years of messing about with bikes that I caused damage (or at least damage I couldn't figure out how to fix !!!)

:guilty:

I haven't got all the details, but plan to pick up the bike tomorrow with a full description of the intricities of it all. Apparently when I installed my Motech crash bars on the bike, I had pinched a wire somewhere against the frame. This has bitten off the insulation and said wire was hanging by one strand against the frame, fooling the bike's brain into thinking that the crankshaft sensor was ronnied!!?? Who'd A thunk it? I had actually gone for a small little ride after installing the bars and before the no starting issue with no problem?!?!

Anyway, I am quite certain my Kawasaki warranty does not cover Acts of God, Fire/Water Damage, or Personal Stupidity, so I am likely on the hook for a length of new wire, some heat shrink, some pricey labour costs and my dignity. :eek:

I'm actually glad that it wasn't the sensor (even though it's repair would have been Free) as it seriously made me question the reliability of this bike. Sorry I ever doubted you, Versys.
 
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