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Discussion Starter #1
I had a small scare earlier today. I was zipping around town, doing various things and took a modest 90 turn, at a modest speed and all of the sudden it felt like my front tire was slipping! almost like I hit an oil patch or something. In the split second, that seemed like about 30 seconds, I glanced down and saw those tar lines that they fill in cracks in the asphalt with. Well, it was close to, if not 100 here in lovely East Texas today, and that stuff gets squishy in the heat.

That wasn't the first time I've had a bit of slippage while turning, but I'm probably more conservative than a lot of riders when it comes to cornering. If I see any gravel, or wet spots, or odd looking bumps in my path while turning, or if it's raining, I go into grandma mode and putt putt.

I guess my question is, is the semi-sporty, kinda stiff suspension, or the non knobby tires at all a contributing factor to my paranoia? :D
 

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I had an old junker that i was not worried about droping and i played in the dirt,, slip slideing around.
That helped me alot on the street.:goodluck:
 

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The stock tires are crap on anything wet.
 

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I guess my question is, is the semi-sporty, kinda stiff suspension, or the non knobby tires at all a contributing factor to my paranoia? :D
No, knobby tires will slip more easily on that stuff. It is a factor of heat. Hot tar turns from a solid into a goo that is becomes slippery. It is most slippery when it is freshly applied. If it has been on the road for a year or two it is much less slippery.
 

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'nother Texan here, and when the heat is up, those tar snakes do get soft and slippery. I hit one with the rear tire (thankfully) on a back road outside Austin last summer that felt like someone had buttered the road. It was a bend to the left, I was going speed-limit-ish and the rear just coasted off the tar snake while I was leaned over, but gripped right back when it hit real pavement again. Not fun....
 

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I keep an eye out for debris or other hazzards in the roadway and adjust my cornering so I am avoiding or passing over without leaning. That might mean doing a double apex turn. Also, if you put your weight on the outside peg and lean you body into the turn the bike stay pretty upright. This is a useful posture when riding dirt roads at speed.

I recommend reading some books by David Hough to help make you more aware of the hazzards out there and good suggestions on how to handle them. "Proficient Motorcycling" and it's follow up books are a good read. "Street Strategies" is a good daily devotional type of book with short reminders of the hazzards that are out there.
 

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I had a pucker moment when I was doing some spirited riding with a friend and we topped a little hill which had a walnut tree overhanging the crest. As I topped the hill, the bike was light on the suspension and we ran into hard green walnuts all over the road. To make it worst, the street turned to the right so I was essentially hitting 2" ball bearings, light, and had to lean to the right. Somehow I managed to make the curve while bouncing around and tightening the ol Sphincter.

Fastoman said it well. "Unless I see a corner fully, i go grandma. Better safe than feel sorry. :D"
 

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Yep... Those tar snakes can sneak up on you. I had a bad front tire slip during a slow turn a while back and by the time I realized she was slipping it was over and I'd made it through without a drop... But it certainly did get my attention and raise my awareness of how I just don't pay attention sometimes like I should to the small stuff. Here in Florida sand creeps its way into the pavement here and there. Any 90 degree turns at an off the beaten path intersection requires focus.
 

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Tar snakes, in my experience, feel worse than they are. When they are hot they'll cause the tire to slip a bit but usually they're small enough or narrow enough that the tire recovers before the bike gets too far out of shape. Notice several people here mentioned them but all recovered. I have never known of anyone crashing because of one. Not saying it can't happen...

The other thing nobody has mentioned yet is that tar snakes provide reduced traction when they're really cold, too. Not as bad as slimy hot, but they are hard and slick in low temps.
 

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Fortunately, there are still places in small-town America where you can find trained professionals who can repair those tar snakes. :D



That is what the sign means, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I rode by the same spot I mentioned in the OP. It's actually a big pool of tar snakes, one big patch...a 'pit' of tar snakes, if you will, probably an 8 foot diameter circle. It's in a spot I drive a lot too. I'm avoiding that spot from now on. I'll have to bring the .410 next time and take out a few snakes ;)
 

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Tar snakes are no fun, worse is fresh chip and seal paving. And when they only are doing patchwork C&S it's like ball bearings you'll slide sideways right off the road as the gravel gets kicked all over the place.

I agree with the NEVER ride faster than you can see. In farm country you never know just what's around the next corner.
 

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Tar snakes, in my experience, feel worse than they are. When they are hot they'll cause the tire to slip a bit but usually they're small enough or narrow enough that the tire recovers before the bike gets too far out of shape. Notice several people here mentioned them but all recovered. I have never known of anyone crashing because of one. Not saying it can't happen...

The other thing nobody has mentioned yet is that tar snakes provide reduced traction when they're really cold, too. Not as bad as slimy hot, but they are hard and slick in low temps.
As a result of some "bum-puckering" moments on 'snakes' - I watch for, and AVOID as best I can...!
:huh:
 

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Tar snakes...I commute on roads where I regularly encounter them.... :censored: :thumbdown:

Something has bothered me about them for a while...why are "they" (those that repair roads) allowed to use "slick" material to fill cracks? :confused: :dgi:Has it been brought to "their" attention that it creates a dangerous situation for some motorists who are operating DOT legal vehicles... I find it hard to believe that "they" are not aware that the seam sealer they currently use creates a slippery surface (at least for 6 months to a year, that is). It clearly seems "they" just don't care :dontcare:...as in, like, "so what, who cares if the sealer creates a slick and slippery surface that can be dangerous for a small population of road users--that's their problem." :huh:
Really, how hard would it be to put some sort of "traction substance" in the sealant that would make it not be slippery? :goodidea: I know I add a product to the paint I use on my deck and it gives it texture and makes it "grippy." :interesting:

bbbbzzzzzzzzssssccccccchhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Back to your regularly scheduled programming....
:rolleyes:
:cheers:
 

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Tar snakes are more of a nuisance than a danger. You slide around on them but as soon as you catch pavement, you've got traction again, scary for a moment but back to normal quickly (assuming it isn't a big "puddle" of tar).
It's been mentioned that they are slick when hot and slick when cold but I think the biggest danger they pose is when it just starts to rain. That tar has alot of oil in it, especially if it's freshly layed, the oil will leach out of the tar snake onto the surrounding pavement when it rains and cause the pavement around the snake to get slick. Of course when it just starts to rain I treat all roads like they are covered with oil, because they usually are.
 

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I've never had tar snake or live snake problems in Canada, although I've seen a few small ones. They are rare and pretty much unnoticed... Our pavement doesn't get nearly as hot up here. It does crack and deform from the ground freezing and thawing over the seasons, with potholes too which are repaired with pavement or cold-mix.
Just gotta keep your eyes open for Moose, and the odd Crocodile.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/story/2012/06/18/sby-kapuskasing-crocodile.html
 

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I've never had tar snake or live snakes problems in Canada, although I've seen a few small ones. They are rare and pretty much unnoticed... Our pavement doesn't get nearly as hot up here. It does crack and deform from the ground freezing and thawing over the seasons, with potholes too which are repaired with pavement or cold-mix.
Just gotta keep your eyes open for Moose, and the odd Crocodile.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/story/2012/06/18/sby-kapuskasing-crocodile.html
You caught me on that one! That is a pet gone bad! We get that once ever ten years here too! ;) :D
 

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The stock tires are crap on anything wet.
The factory Dunplops are the biggest POS tires. Your lucky to live in warmer climate where you do get some stick out of them. I'm due for tires after this riding season. Every bike I've owned as of late has had Dunnies on it when bought. I've never liked the brand, and have always upgraded to better tires. This winter, a change over to Avon Storm's for me.
 
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