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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Did this today and learned a few things.

  • the only way to reliably adjust screws is with short flat head screw driver. The motion pro tool I purchased for this is unreliable as you cannot always tell if it is gripping screw and is hard to position without removing everything at which point you can just access with a screw driver.
  • adjusting screws had NO effect on vacuum gauge however even moving hoses of vacuum gauge registered on gauges
  • Kawasaki could not have positioned the adjustment screws in a more difficult to access position if they tried
  • it is impossible to remove the vacuum port covers without tearing them, at least if they are a few years old
  • it is preferable to have a set of Allen keys that are not on a fold out type device as it is impossible to tighten the air box hold down bolts with an allen key through the small access port if your allen keys are attached to a pocket knife type fold out body. I ended up purchasing a high quality set of Allen keys that have a detent in one end to hold bolts. They work great and I would have got these in the first place instead of the cheap fold out allen key sets you see everywhere if only I had known better. They are just better and easier to use.
  • the fuel tank electrical connector is a puzzle to unlatch. The only way to unlatch is slip a narrow bladed screw driver down the side. What look like latches on the sides are just there to confuse. ;)
At this point I am more confused than when I began. I did remove the screws and clean them but it made no difference. The gauge did show an imbalance between cylinders but I ended up screwing both adjustment screws down and buttoning up the bike.

BTW I have a gen 2 bike (2010-2014). Has anyone else had success with this?
 

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What was the original setting of your screws? You're supposed to leave the screw that is closed alone, and adjust the open screw to balance both TB vacuum readings at 1,300 rpm idle speed... TB vacuum adjustment screws are easily accessible with air box removed, and rear of fuel tank propped up. Airbox is easily removed and installed by loosening the screws underneath it on the TB flanges with a long Philips #2 screwdriver.
 

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@twowheels sounds like you are doing it all wrong.

I have a Gen 2 and posted stuff in your other thread.

Also... get proper tools... those fold out tool pocket knife like sets are gimmicks.
I bought a socket set of hex drivers - from 3mm to 19mm hex.
fit them to 1/4 and 3/8 extentions/wrenches and much better than allen keys when working on the bike.

Pretty much most Fuel Injected bikes have throttle adjusting screw is the same place.... My Yamaha Super Tenere is the same.

I can't remember if the motion pro tool fits our screw heads.
I have tried to use it but it is too fiddly and not enough room with the tank on to get all the hoses on and off.
once the tanks is propped up and off to the side and airbox off it is easier to adjust TB with a small flat screwdriver.

When using the motion pro screw driver the outer case for the tip is notched so you can see how to hook the tip onto the adjustment port. you then have to push the handle so that the flat screwdriver moves out tip and engages the screw head. lightly turn the handle so that the blade pops into the screw slot then you have be gentle when turning to adjust the screw.
Biggest issue for me is you cannot see if it is working and you loose the feeling in you finger of blade and slot engagement etc.

Also treat this time to check airfilter and spark plugs as you are there anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
What was the original setting of your screws? You're supposed to leave the screw that is closed alone, and adjust the open screw to balance both TB vacuum readings at 1,300 rpm idle speed... TB vacuum adjustment screws are easily accessible with air box removed, and rear of fuel tank propped up. Airbox is easily removed and installed by loosening the screws underneath it on the TB flanges with a long Philips #2 screwdriver.
My air box is held down with four hex head bolts that are accessed through a removable port on top of air box. No need to take air box apart with Philips head screws to remove it.

Did not get a vacuum reading as the Carb Tune gauge I have only shows ratios not actual vacuum levels.

What I am trying to figure out is why the brass adjustment screws have no impact on vacuum. I would expect to see a noticeable change in vacuum when I move them. I am assuming at this point perhaps something is clogged as the manual alludes to.

Since I cannot see the screws while adjusting as they are buried under the fuel rail and wiring and initially had a problem determining if the screw driver was connecting with anything I did not get their original setting.
 

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buy yourself an inspection mirror on a telescopic rod... invaluable !

Yes seeing if the screw actually are moving is hard.
Once a small screw driver is in the port turning the screw clockwise lightly and feeling it stop is good. If you mark the screw driver on the shank just behind the tip you can count the turns etc.

You should see changes in vacuum. even with little turns of the crews it will be detectable.
maybe you carb tune hoses have blockages... pull them off and try blowing threw them.
now blow from the other end to test.
 

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My air box is held down with four hex head bolts that are accessed through a removable port on top of air box. No need to take air box apart with Philips head screws to remove it.

Did not get a vacuum reading as the Carb Tune gauge I have only shows ratios not actual vacuum levels.

What I am trying to figure out is why the brass adjustment screws have no impact on vacuum. I would expect to see a noticeable change in vacuum when I move them. I am assuming at this point perhaps something is clogged as the manual alludes to.

Since I cannot see the screws while adjusting as they are buried under the fuel rail and wiring and initially had a problem determining if the screw driver was connecting with anything I did not get their original setting.
There's no need to separate your airbox via top port if you remove the entire airbox in one piece by simply loosening the flange mount screws underneath.

Whatever the scale is, you need to be able to read both TB vacuum levels simultaneously to balance them out.

You need to have visual control of your adjustment screws to know if you're adjusting them at all. Leave the closed screw closed, and adjust the open screw to balance both TB vacuum levels at 1,3000 rpm idle.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Made a second attempt at this and seem to have got it right this time. Idle RPM increased ~500 RPM with sync which tells me it is running better. Also vibration is slightly reduced. Left cylinder screw is fully seated, Right screw is half way out which tells me that I probably need a valve adjust.

The main issue I faced is getting decent access to adjustment screws. The motion pro tool I purchased is worthless. Do not recommend anyone buy this tool. Because you cannot easily get a regular length screw driver to align with the screw head due to interference from frame it is not possible to sense what screw is doing by twisting screw driver handle. You have to turn the screw head with the blade at an angle instead of straight on. As a result I found you have to turn 1/2 turn and recheck position of screw. Also screw position changes are not immediately reflected on vacuum gauge, you have to blip throttle and then let gauge settle down after each turn. A short handle narrow slot screw driver would have been really handy for this. Unfortunately finding a short handle screw driver with a small slot blade is damn near impossible, at least from normal sources like Canadian Tire, Home Depot and Princess Auto (Harbor Freight in US).

All in all not a complex or difficult job, but with a few idiosyncrasies.

For anyone else bothering to read this thread here's some advice based on what I learned
* buy a short handled small blade (slot type) screw driver first
* take your time figuring out how to unplug two electrical connections to tank, one plug is not obvious how it unlatches
* slide up red slider on tank fuel line connector and pull line off tank, process described in manual
* remove air box by removing top panel on box to gain access to hex bolts, which you also have to remove, holding it to throttle bodies, you will need regular or T handle Allen keys for this, a pocket knife type Allen key set will not work as you will not be able to fit it through the small access space. An Allen key set with detentes to hold bolts to the Allen key after it is removed is ideal for this job.
* reverse fuel tank position 180 degrees, front of tank at rear of bike, and position on frame where seat normally goes. Strap it in place if you think it might fall. Ideally do this procedure with an almost empty tank to make tank easier to move around and less top heavy. You need the fuel tank connected ( fuel gauge connection does not matter) to run the bike.
* be careful removing rubber plugs from vacuum ports on throttle bodies as they split easily if you use needle nose pliers.
 

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small flat head screwdrivers can be bought cheaply from a $1 shop

or you can make one with a coat hanger wire - hammer one end flat and file or cut tip off to make it a straight flat end, other end bend so you can twist wire and see angle of turns.
 

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I used a ratcheting screwdriver on my Yamaha, the kind with a slotted head that ratchets in a 3 or 4 inch handle. You only need about 1/2" to fit it in. Kind of a pain to reversed direction, though. Harbor Freight sell a version of this, although not as compact as the Yankee I have had for 50 years or more.

https://www.shop411.com/shopping?qsrc=999&qo=semQuery&ad=semD&o=37223&l=sem&askid=916ccade-be7d-41a5-a293-316e959c0441-0-sf_gsb&q=yankee ratchet screwdriver&dqi=&am=broad&an=google_s

https://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?dir=asc&order=EAScore,f,EAFeatured+Weight,f,Sale+Rank,f&p=2&q=offset+screwdriver
 
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