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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question: a ton of posts have been made on the internet about CO2 vs slime vs compressor. What I have difficult in finding is the answer to the following: how many 16 g CO2 canister would I need to properly inflate a Versys 650 tire after a puncture?

I ask because I have read of people using up to 6 canisters (!!!), but then I stumbled upon a youtube video of a BMW mechanic who states that one 16 g CO2 canister is enough to fill the tire up, since the pressure will significantly increase while riding and it will reach a value for which the bike can be taken to a service point.

Has anybody checked the pressure when filled up and after a little riding to see how big of a difference there is?

Thank you!
 

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I used 4 cartridges a couple weekends ago on the rear tire, it was still sloppy low.

The air does go in at an incredibly low temperature, but I don't know how much more it'd come up in pressure as it warms up.

I think I'd rather have a compressor if it's possible to carry it. I've heard of people using those small bicycle pumps, too, but that'd get old pretty quick in my book.

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I think the idea is if you need to repair a puncture at the side of the road you can do it with a puncture kit and CO2 canisters. Not to completely inflate the tire to normal riding pressure.

The only time I needed to do this I used two CO2 bottles. With one the tire seemed very empty. With two it felt that could be ridden, but underinflated. I think with 2 you're good to go to a proper service area or gas station to pump up the rest of the air. If you ride slow and carefully. But just in case now I ride with 3 CO2 bottles in my kit :)
 

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I carry both an electric pump and a small bicycle pump when travelling. The bike pump isn't all that difficult or tiring, though it is the backup plan now if the electric fails. Around town I usually just take the bicycle pump in a pannier or top box because it is small and light.

CO2 is a cool idea. No idea how many would be needed. The pressure won't increase much when riding on it, maybe a bit over 10%. So you should plan on getting it up near 30-ish psi on the CO2.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the feedback. The CO2 looks nice because it's compact. Frankly I do not want to ride with a compressor since there isn't that much space under the seat :)

I am curious about the bike pump: is it effective in a doable time? I thought it would have taken ages to fill up a rear tire with a bike pump. I should try that at home! That would be a good backup solution and it would not need much space.
 

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I would suggest that it's NEVER a good idea to ride w/ an underinflated tire, NO MATTER THE REASON.

I carry a 12v pump and plugs in case I need them.

Good luck.
 

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I got a rear flat about 4 months ago and the two CO2 cartridges I had on hand were not enough. Fortunately for me, I made a new friend when a fellow on a BMW GS stopped by to give me a hand. He had a bunch of cartridges, and I used 3 of his. It looks like for a Versys rear tire, each cartridge was good for about 7PSI. 3 might have been enough to limp the nearest gas station, but 5 is a lot better. Now I carry both some cartridges and a small Harbor Freight compressor in a pannier.

-dm
 

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Thanks for the feedback. The CO2 looks nice because it's compact. Frankly I do not want to ride with a compressor since there isn't that much space under the seat :)

I am curious about the bike pump: is it effective in a doable time? I thought it would have taken ages to fill up a rear tire with a bike pump. I should try that at home! That would be a good backup solution and it would not need much space.
Well it depends on your tolerance for adventure, and desire for sense of accomplishment. I have used a floor style bicycle pump to seat the bead on new tires 4 times now. I pump up any low tire at home, car or bike, using the floor pump.

The hand pump is a wide diameter design, lower pressure higher volume, for mountain bikes. I've aired up from about 25 lbs to 36 lbs with that pump numerous times before getting the electric pump. There is a satisfaction in the accomplishment. It doesn't take too long, maybe a couple minutes max. It causes a little muscle burn but not bad at all despite my approaching decrepitude.

The high pressure skinny diameter pumps for road bikes are not what you want. They don't move much air, and take more work. Look for the fatter shorter mountain bike style. I am confident it will work as long as I don't have to break the bead, even if the tire goes to zero psi. So I happily take just the hand pump if I am not mounting panniers.
 

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I carry 3 cart of CO2 always, carry the pump too if I'm leaving for more than about 100 miles.
 
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I always carry my CyclePump Air Compressor, Tire Puncture Repair Kit and in the black case an Air Gauge, Leatherman Multi-Tool and a Pocket Knife. under the seat...


P1010524 by weljo2001, on Flickr


Untitled by weljo2001, on Flickr
 

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Thanks for the feedback. The CO2 looks nice because it's compact. Frankly I do not want to ride with a compressor since there isn't that much space under the seat :)
Ha ha ha - There is almost no space under the seat. I can barely fit my registration papers, a small disk brake lock, a Leatherman tool, a kickstand pad, and a small roll of electric tape (and the kickstand pad shifts). Storing a tire repair kit and a mini-compressor there is fantasy :rolleyes:. That said, if you've got side bags or other luggage and have room for the tire repair kit, why not throw in a Slime 40061 Power Sport Tire Inflator too? (AAA membership is also an option.)

I own a tire repair kit with 3 CO2 cartridges (J&P Cycles Tubeless Tire Repair Kit - YP881) but have only used it on a car tire. It was good practice. I only burned one repair strip and the kit paid for itself. (Everything I've read say the CO2 cartridges are only meant to get you to the closest service station unless you have half a dozen.) Good luck.
 

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I'd say the c02 will save you some inflating time (get it started), but expecting to lose pressure I would never rely only on C02 (risk of running out of it).
So carrying the pump means you have no reason to run underinflated anymore (and risk overheating the rubber, or breaking bead).

Totally behind having a compressor of course.
Seat space (650 gen3) is limited sideways but it's higher than we can see - do tests!
I managed to fit a bicycle pump in there with the plugs kit, safety wires, spare H7 bulb bubble-wrapped, pressure gauge, and more...
 

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If you have a threaded connector on your co2 inflator, you can get bigger cartridges in 20, 25, and 88g. The cost vs equal number of 16g is often substantially lower.
My tire inflator has the larger threaded connector for using 20/25/88g, but it has a screw on shell that will also let me use 12g & 16g cartridges as well.

The nice thing is the trigger valve and dial gauge on it allows me to control how much co2 to use, instead of dumping the whole cart like some I've seen. With the larger 25 and 88g, this becomes even more important.
 
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